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Have You Ever Been Seriously LOST?

Travel Forums General Talk Have You Ever Been Seriously LOST?

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21. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

One time that I was "seriously" lost that stands out occured in Papua New Guinea. The reason it stands out is because I was not driving nor wolking but was IN A PLANE. Since we were 15,000 feet up and lost, I'd say it was serious.

Before we left I asked the co-pilot how long the flight was and he said 30 minutes. It was a very cloudy, overcast day. And that appeared to be the problem, when we were flying above the clouds, the pilot could not see where we were, and when we were lower we were in the clouds (and in New Guinea there are mountains over 15,000 feet) and ran the serious rick of crashing into the side of a mountain.

Anyway, after 45-50 minutes I became VERY concerned (remember 30 minute flight). I also noticed the co-pilot appeared to be very nervous and was constantly wiping the sweat from his forehead. I also noticed that we were flying not just in circles but more like figure eights. Then the real clue that things were NOT going well came when the pilot took out a MAP! That's the last thing you want to see your pilot looking at WHILE you're in the air.

Behind me on the plane was 1 Western woman, 2 guys in feathers (I'm not kidding), and a bunch of baby chickens making baby chicken noises. I truely thought this was going to be the end, and is the only time in my life that I thought it was all gonna come to a not-so-happy-ending. We kept going in figure eights, avove the clouds, below the clouds, and then finally, , after more than 60 minutes the pilot spotted some mountain peak, they looked at the map, appeared relieved, and we were back on track. Yeaaaaaay!

I'd consider that seriously lost, don't ya think?

22. Posted by stevieh (Respected Member 611 posts) 11y

Hi,
Getting lost, or maybe being lost, is definitely a psychological issue.
I subscribe to the idea that it can be good to be lost (as long as you've got your passport, money and warm clothes etc), but my sister hyperventilates if she doesn't know precisely where she is at any given moment. Weird.
Maybe this is part of the traveller/tourist debate? A tourist would know exactly where they were (and where they were going) at all times, whereas a traveller may, but may not, wouldn't be too flustered about it if they didn't, and would just cope and enjoy.
Probably.

23. Posted by bluewaav (Inactive 627 posts) 11y

When I was at Emerald Lake, I went hiking around another lake, on a winding arterial trail that goes through some wood. It got to be dusk, and, of course, it gets dark really quickly in the mountains, so in a matter of ten minutes or so, it was dark. Pitch black. I couldn't see anything; I was feeling the dip in the trail like I was blind, but I had it memorized. Kind of. It was just one part, and it was so dark. At one point I was so lost and I could only see shapes, and this eagle's nest that I'd never seen before, or passed previously, completely freaked me out! I cannot remember how I got out of there!!

24. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 11y

I haven't really ever gotten lost (momentarily misplaced, maybe), but that last post reminded me of something I recently read in Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything." It gave me the heebie-jeebies, so I thought I'd share...

To paraphrase, three workers at Yellowstone National Park went to swim in a warm water pool one evening. Coming back, with not a-one of them having remembered a flashlight, they tried to retrace their steps in the dark. As they arrived at what they thought was a small stream, they joined hands and ran to jump over it. Turns out it wasn't a stream at all, but a boiling pool.

I can't imagine anything worse than getting lost in the dark.

25. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

Quoting tway

...they joined hands and ran to jump over it...

That was their mistake. My approach would have been "go ahead, I'm right behind you."

Is that a true story?

26. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 11y

After you, indeed!

The details may be a little hazy, but that's what he reported in his book. I looked for the exerpt on-line, but no luck. However, someone wrote a book called Death in Yellowstone - so there must be quite a few stories out there.

27. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 11y

Spoke too soon - here's the exerpt:

"The risks at Yellowstone apply to park employees as much as to visitors. Doss got a horrific sense of that in his first week on the job five years earlier. Late one night, three young summer employees engaged in an illicit activity known as ?hot-potting? ? swimming or basking in warm pools. Though the park, for obvious reasons, doesn?t publicize it, not all the pools in Yellowstone are dangerously hot. Some are extremely agreeable to lie in, and it was the habit of some of the summer employees to have a dip late at night even though it was against the rules to do so. Foolishly the threesome had failed to take a flashlight, which was extremely dangerous because much of the soil around the warm pools is crusty and thin and one can easily fall through into a scalding vent below. In any case, as they made their way back to their dorm, they came across a stream that they had had to leap over earlier. They backed up a few paces, linked arms and, on the count of three, took a running jump. In fact, it wasn?t the stream at all. It was a boiling pool. In the dark they had lost their bearings. None of the three survived."

28. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

Quoting tway

Spoke too soon - here's the exerpt:

"The risks at Yellowstone apply to park employees as much as to visitors. Doss got a horrific sense of that in his first week on the job five years earlier. Late one night, three young summer employees engaged in an illicit activity known as ?hot-potting? ? swimming or basking in warm pools. Though the park, for obvious reasons, doesn?t publicize it, not all the pools in Yellowstone are dangerously hot. Some are extremely agreeable to lie in, and it was the habit of some of the summer employees to have a dip late at night even though it was against the rules to do so. Foolishly the threesome had failed to take a flashlight, which was extremely dangerous because much of the soil around the warm pools is crusty and thin and one can easily fall through into a scalding vent below. In any case, as they made their way back to their dorm, they came across a stream that they had had to leap over earlier. They backed up a few paces, linked arms and, on the count of three, took a running jump. In fact, it wasn?t the stream at all. It was a boiling pool. In the dark they had lost their bearings. None of the three survived."

WOW, pretty dramatic ending :(

29. Posted by bluewaav (Inactive 627 posts) 11y

Oh yah, there are tons and tons of stories like that about Yellowstone ...! The classics are the stories of the explorers.. er pilgrims.. or pioneers?!!

Not that scarey, compared to stories I've heard about people being boiled in mud pots, or stepping on the wrong part of the crust . . . dipping a hand into the hot spring on solid ground and scoulding one's self! Or what about Old Faithful, the infamous Natural wonder of the world?

Peace,

Steph

30. Posted by bluewaav (Inactive 627 posts) 11y

That is, meant to say, 'on the wrong part of the crust'... and falling through.

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