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Work and Holiday late 2014; getting stressed out

Travel Forums Australia / New Zealand & The Pacific Work and Holiday late 2014; getting stressed out

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11. Posted by eastcoastkid (Budding Member 9 posts) 2y

About the hostel thing; it's because they don't know anything. My parents, or better yet nobody in my family, has ever gone on a trip like this before and they don't know what everything is going to be like lol. I wanna explain everything as best as I can to them so they're more inclined to ease up on things. I'm probably just gonna say they're like cheap hotels, have dorm/private rooms, cost like $20-40 a night and are all over Australia.

I wanna see NZ eventually but there's literally nothing that could stop me from seeing Australia right now. It's the number 1 place on my list by miles lol.

And for the insurance thing, I'm from the United States, and I saw DUInsure said it covered Brits and NZers? All I can find for travel insurance is stuff that's going to cost an arm and a leg

12. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4835 posts) 2y

What might be good to explicitly mention about hostels is that they're "communal" places. There's big well-stocked kitchens where everybody cooks their own meals which creates a very social atmosphere; and everybody is supposed to clean up after themselves, with decent social controls on that actually happening. (There's many hostels where this isn't the case, but true for the better type of hostels.) Same for the lounge / living room area. Also people working at reception at these hostels tend to be travellers themselves, so are very helpful when you need to get your bearings, don't know how to get to the airport, are looking for help with finding work, need your next hostel booked, etc, and if you stay for more than a couple of days at an individual hostel, you get to really know the other people staying there.

[ Edit: Edited on 07-Apr-2014, at 10:36 by Sander ]

13. Posted by eastcoastkid (Budding Member 9 posts) 2y

Quoting Sander

What might be good to explicitly mention about hostels is that they're "communal" places. There's big well-stocked kitchens where everybody cooks their own meals which creates a very social atmosphere; and everybody is supposed to clean up after themselves, with decent social controls on that actually happening. (There's many hostels where this isn't the case, but true for the better type of hostels.) Same for the lounge / living room area. Also people working at reception at these hostels tend to be travellers themselves, so are very helpful when you need to get your bearings, don't know how to get to the airport, are looking for help with finding work, need your next hostel booked, etc, and if you stay for more than a couple of days at an individual hostel, you get to really know the other people staying there.

Thank you for this, and yeah I think telling them it is a social atmosphere will really help. Definitely going to tell them you meet people you might end up traveling with too.

Also is it fairly common to work for accommodation at the hostel you're currently staying? I'd have no problem doing that as it saves anywhere from like $25+ a night and all I'd really need to spend money on is food or trips.

14. Posted by KellieBarnes (Admin 813 posts) 2y

Quoting eastcoastkid

I'm probably just gonna say they're like cheap hotels, have dorm/private rooms, cost like $20-40 a night and are all over Australia.

That would be the best way, plus as Sander says, the main benefit (apart from being cheaper than a hotel) is the community that you find in hostels – instant camaraderie, support, help, and sometimes travel buddies to join your onwards adventures!

Providing all of the information to prepare your parents is a good idea but I also wouldn't worry too much; the depth of research and planning you have already put in is more than many others would do and I'm sure your parents will be impressed. Or I would be :)

15. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4835 posts) 2y

Quoting eastcoastkid

Also is it fairly common to work for accommodation at the hostel you're currently staying?

Yes, as in, you can expect to do that at some point during your trip (as long as you can commit to staying in that place for at least three weeks and preferably more, since otherwise it doesn't make sense for the hostel to train you) - but not every hostel is always looking for someone, so it's not a guaranteed thing, ever.

16. Posted by eastcoastkid (Budding Member 9 posts) 2y

Quoting KellieBarnes

Quoting eastcoastkid

I'm probably just gonna say they're like cheap hotels, have dorm/private rooms, cost like $20-40 a night and are all over Australia.

That would be the best way, plus as Sander says, the main benefit (apart from being cheaper than a hotel) is the community that you find in hostels – instant camaraderie, support, help, and sometimes travel buddies to join your onwards adventures!

Providing all of the information to prepare your parents is a good idea but I also wouldn't worry too much; the depth of research and planning you have already put in is more than many others would do and I'm sure your parents will be impressed. Or I would be :)

Haha thank you, it means a lot that people know how serious I am about this! I feel like I know a lot, but then there's times when I get confused and times where I feel like I'm over thinking everything.

For example: there's so much to see, do, etc. and I'm just sitting here thinking to myself "how am I going to do all this in 12 months?" I'm really just trying to tell myself that you can have a plan of things to do, but you'll figure everything out when you arrive. Would you agree/disagree on having that type of mindset?

Sander: Yeah I'm planning on being in Sydney from mid December to at least early January then possibly going straight to the Great Barrier Reef because it's summer, but I'm not 100% sure yet. Working for a room is fine by me because it's only a couple hours out of a day plus it can save some decent money!

Eventually I'll get to getting from city to city, but right now it's about preparing for Sunday (telling my parents!). The nerves are gone and strangely enough I'm slightly looking forward to it.

17. Posted by KellieBarnes (Admin 813 posts) 2y

Quoting eastcoastkid

Haha thank you, it means a lot that people know how serious I am about this! I feel like I know a lot, but then there's times when I get confused and times where I feel like I'm over thinking everything.

For example: there's so much to see, do, etc. and I'm just sitting here thinking to myself "how am I going to do all this in 12 months?" I'm really just trying to tell myself that you can have a plan of things to do, but you'll figure everything out when you arrive. Would you agree/disagree on having that type of mindset?

Completely agree. Have a vague overall plan of the kinds of things you would like to achieve but leave room to wing it and just got with the flow; that way if an opportunity comes up to visit/move/work in a completely unexpected location, you can be flexible and may end up having the best experience of your trip.

Also, I would suggest being aware that some of your goals may not be achievable. I lived in Japan for a year and never got to see Mt Fuji but I did hundreds of other amazing things and know that I can do it another time.

18. Posted by eastcoastkid (Budding Member 9 posts) 2y

I swear to god this happens like clockwork EVERY TIME I get back into the idea of going over to Australia. I work hard on research and planning and just like that my interest in the trip as a whole goes right down the drain. It's legitimately the most frustrating thing in the world. Just yesterday I was working on my packet and today I don't even care about going anymore. I'm sure the cycle will repeat itself in a couple of weeks too. I'm not afraid of telling my parents in anyway, shape or form, but thank god I didn't bring this up and then change my mind a week later.

Not knowing what to do with your life has to be the most frustrating thing in the world. Back to square one I see lol

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