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emigrating to UK

Travel Forums Introductions emigrating to UK

1. Posted by prettypiggy (Budding Member 3 posts) 49w

I attempt the ultimate travel adventure: emigration. it is like being a full-time working tourists, at least in the beginning it feels like this.

I'm a Bulgarian who moved to UK 7 months ago, to London. But I don't like it here: too many people, too expensive rents, too many bed-bugs, too many foreigners, too much exposure to broken English. I've been thinking of moving to the country, to Glasgow or Liverpool. Both areas are economically depressed (and therefore I hope to buy a property without a mortgage), yet it seems possible to find a job. After all, I'm not after high salary, I'm after calm life.

This is an important decision as I intend to buy an apartment and settle there for the rest of my life.

I'm unable to take a decision because I try to consider too many factors:
1. I was told that the Scottish people are easier to communicate with and are friendlier, especially towards foreigners, and my personal experience seems to confirm this.
2. Scots, however, may hold another referendum about getting out of UK and, if they do get out, they'll be out of EU as well, This may be a problem for me as I'm allowed to settle there as long as both my and their countries are within EU.
3. I'm not enthusiastic to learn a new language. What if the Scots, having left UK, make it necessary to learn their language?
4. I plan to work as a welder, not as a lawyer (although, surprisingly, I was told by colleagues that I'm allowed to register as a lawyer in UK right now; I haven't looked into this for even if this is the case I won't do something as foolish as this - a Bulgarian lawyer here will be as useless as a UK lawyer in |Bulgaria). However, the oil rigs, are not in Glasgow, in other words, I don't know if there are more opportunities for welders in Glasgow.
5. Scottish law is closer to the continental one, the law I've been trained to practice. This, however, hardly matters if I'm not willing to work as a lawyer.
6. I also learned that I, being an EU citizen, am entitled to a free university education in Scotland, but I haven't researched this either; even if it is true, I can do distance learning in a Scottish university while living in Liverpool. Besides, I'm sure I want to have another master's degree.
7. Apart from apartments, there are really cheap houses in Liverpool. I like the romantic idea of buying and gradually refurbishing one as I enjoy physical work, but I doubt it's a good idea: I may know something about construction work, but I don't know the local market, the rules, etc.

2. Posted by Andyf (Travel Guru 639 posts) 49w

Yeah I don't like London, for a lot of the same reasons.

Ok, I'll see which bits I can comment on :

Your right to stay - I think even if the UK or Scotland decide to leave the EU, everything said so far suggests that someone already living here will be able to continue living here.

Language - modern Scot, and Scouse in Liverpool, are both just accents of English. In both cases it will take you some time to learn, and any town in Britain has its own accent - though those two are pretty extreme ones. Nothing about that would change on Scottish independence.

Yes Scotland has a more open culture with people willing to talk to strangers. Only London is very bad at this, and generally the culture gets more friendly and open as you go north.

You can find semi derelict houses anywhere to do up - I wouldn't let that sway me towards a place.

If London is too busy, why are you looking at other cities? Towns may be a better choice, and often lower property prices.

3. Posted by prettypiggy (Budding Member 3 posts) 48w

Thank you for your comment.

Scot is now included in the school curriculum. It is not far fetched to expect that some day it may become an official language, if not the official language, of independent Scotland.

I look at Glasgow and Liverpool only because these two cities are at the intersection of property affordability (I have 20 thousand pounds only) and job availability. There are other places when one can find cheaper properties, but no jobs; there are other places where one can find better job opportunities, but no apartments below 20 thousand pounds.

4. Posted by Andyf (Travel Guru 639 posts) 48w

Believe me the properties costing under £20,000 will cost you plenty to make habitable, even for a handy DIY-er they aren't normally a bargain.

5. Posted by Andyf (Travel Guru 639 posts) 48w

On the language issue :

What Scottish people speak is English, their local accent and dialect, but it's English and that will not change. To live there and cope, you will never need anything apart from the local version of English.

Scotland also has two other languages but these won't affect you. Scottish Gaelic is spoken by around 1% of the population, this is on some of the islands and in the remote highlands. The language called "Scots" is a dead language like Old English - some poetry is written in it, but 0% of the people speak it in daily life. Both these languages have supporters who are trying to keep them alive, hence getting them official status, but they aren't going to replace English.

6. Posted by prettypiggy (Budding Member 3 posts) 48w

Thank you both for your advice.

As for the property under 20 thousand pounds, my choice is not between such a property or a better one: my choice is between this and none.

An apartment under 20 thousand is already habitable no matter how poor its condition as long as the walls are there and the roof is not leaking. I don't mind living in austere conditions as long as I have a post box and I will be able to lie dry in the evening and be able to sleep without ear-plugs or ear mufflers. My needs are modest. I want to be able to sleep without interruptions in the middle of the night, to be able to go with a bicycle to work, and to have time to finish the book I write.

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Oct-2015, at 04:47 by prettypiggy ]