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1. Posted by ray672 (Budding Member 9 posts) 43w

Hey there guys! I am travelling alone for the first time outside my own country Norway!! I have decided for it to be Thailand and the first place i'll be visiting is Chiang Mai! Firstly i am a little bit nervous that i will maybe miss my own plane and stuff like that but yeah. I'll probably manage, haha! Anyone else travelling to Chiang Mai? I will arrive 20 February! Would love to have a travelling partner for the 2 weeks I am there. Maybe i'll go south to Phuket or something later on, because maybe 2 weeks are maybe too much to stay in one place??

Are there any tips you guys would like to give a person travelling alone for the first time?? I would love all the tips i can get,things that i have to bring with me, things i should be prepared for?will appreciate everything no matter how small it is! Tips about what to do there, I love extreme sports, like trekking, rafting, skydiving, bungie jumping, climbing and or anything else you loved ! Anyone else gonna be there on the 20th February that would like to travel with me? Would love some company :D! a happy 20 years old male. Already feeling nervous lols!

[ Edit: Edited on 06-Feb-2016, at 12:02 by ray672 ]

2. Posted by karazyal (Travel Guru 1653 posts) 43w

Are there any tips you guys would like to give a person travelling alone for the first time??"

One thing you can do is read some of the many posts for "solo traveler" or "traveling alone" on this forum, even some of the ones for "solo woman traveler" for information. For quick information even a Google search can be helpful.

Most flights from Europe stop in Bangkok first. Keep in mind that Bangkok has 2 airports. Know which one your connecting flight leaves from. These two airports are not close together.

For two weeks my advice is to also include Bangkok in your holiday trip. Bangkok is worth a visit. Perhaps do some research on Khao San Road area of Bangkok for hotel location. Many tourists in your age bracket choose that area.

If NOK is your currency you will probably get a better rate of exchange in Thailand than another country. Check the rate chart below. Bank money changers available at the airport 24 hours a day. If you intend to use debit type cards for cash through ATM withdrawals there will be a fee for each transaction. Don't waste big fees on small withdrawal amounts. There are some posts on this forum for how to handle money, use ATMs, how to get from airport, etc. Do a search on a computer. Don't rely on a single debit card for your spending money. Lose that card or a new acquaintance steals it you will be out of money.
http://daytodaydata.net/

Don't skip Bangkok. You will meet other tourists on buses, in taxis, even walking around. If not you will still have a nice time. Thailand is very user friendly. You do meet other tourists on tours too. (Bangkok is cheaper than Phuket. Do a Google search for "things to see and do" in Bangkok, Chiang Mai and Phuket or other cities you have an interest in.

Always do a search for scams to avoid. Also know best way from airport to hotel too. Find the cities you have an interest in on a map.

Medical - travel insurance might be helpful since you like risky stuff. Safety regulations may not be as rigidly enforced compared to your country. Tourists do get seriously hurt and even killed doing some of these risky sports. You getting hurt can be costly! If you intend to drive yourself, even rent motor scooters, keep in mind that motor vehicle accidents account for quite a few of the tourist deaths in Thailand. (Do a Google search on this.) You should have an International Drivers License if driving yourself. (You may be able to rent a bike without a proper license, but if you get in an accident you will wish you were driving legally!
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/national/Norwegian-tourist-dies-in-a-boat-accident-while-di-30250460.html

Don't drink so much alcohol you lose your common sense! Don't hang around with anyone doing dope! Even if a Thai sells you dope you still go to prison! Thai prisons suck!

[ Edit: Edited on 08-Feb-2016, at 13:31 by karazyal ]

3. Posted by ray672 (Budding Member 9 posts) 43w

holy moly, i dont wanna die yet haha! yeah, i should get travel insurance as fast as possible haha! and I looked up on the scams to avoid because i didn't read at all about it! There are quite a few things to keep an eye out for. Thanks alot! I would most likely fall for most of the scams i read about so this helped alot!

4. Posted by karazyal (Travel Guru 1653 posts) 43w

Falling in love (or lust) with a local lady (or ladyboy) and sending money to her after you return home is another thing some tourists do. (You may not be the only guy sending money!!!)

On buses, taxis and trains keep your money and valuables on your person or within sight. Some long distant bus scams originate with KSR travel agencies. These scams involve valuables stolen from checked in bags. Also crappy buses that break down sometimes. Keep your passport with you and not stuffed in a bag. Buy bus tickets from a real bus station not KSR travel agency!

Don't let your passport get soaked. Photocopy the data page of your passport and later on the arrival stamp you get at the airport. Keep the copy separate from the passport in case you lose your passport.

In Bangkok tuk-tuks are often involved in scams. (Meter taxis in Bangkok are cheaper than tuk-tuks providing you pay the meter fare and do not pay a flat rate.)

Tuk-tuk scams, palace closed, bus scams and gold and jewelry scams are some to research.

For you look up Koh Phangan. This beach area is popular with younger tourists.

(Beach areas also have scams with rented watercraft and rented scooters. Read some of those scams.)

[ Edit: Edited on 08-Feb-2016, at 19:39 by karazyal ]

5. Posted by ray672 (Budding Member 9 posts) 43w

I doubt i'll go south but all of these tips are really helpful! im going to discover north thailand i think :D going for Pai, Chiang Dao and ofcourse starting off in Chiang Mai, so I doubt that i will be visiting any beaches! not really the party type haha. Is it enough keep my valuables in my backpack that i will be travelling with at all times?? i should probably not keep it in the pocket. All my clothes will be in this bag i will be travelling with ,passport cash and stuff. I kinda want to develop as a person i guess, having been sheltered my whole life i think this is going to be a great experience physically and mentally lol:

6. Posted by jasminewilliam (Budding Member 2 posts) 43w

You must carry all the necessary things with such as cellphone, money, clothes. And you must learn how to ask to people properly.

7. Posted by berner256 (Travel Guru 528 posts) 43w

I learned two things on my first trip overseas: Protect my passport; protect my feet.

No passport: No travel. Injure your feet; and walking can be a real pain.

Back then, I put my passport in my bag; and it was stolen in a Paris hostel while I was sleeping. Lucky there was a U.S. embassy there to replace it. Later, I rode a moped with flip-flops and broke the big toe of my right foot. Stupid.

Your passport is your most valuable possession while traveling. You can't get back into your country without it. In some places, such as India and China, you have to produce it to check-in to accommodations. You also need it to board international flights. Sometimes you must show it to change money. The most secure place to store your passport is in a money belt. Make sure you put the passport in a plastic bag to protect it against moisture damage.

I see a lot of people walking around cities, as well as on hikes, wearing flip-flops. That might be OK for locals with feet hardened by years of walking without footwear, particularly in developing countries. But for most, it's a painful accident waiting to happen.

One more thing. It's wise to estimate how much money you plan to use on a given day. Then place it in a secure pocket or two. That way, there's no need to flash a wad of cash, which could make you an inviting target for thieves. It also pays to be alert, particularly in crowded places such as bus stations. You don't want to be a victim.

There's no need to be fearful about travel. All it takes is a little common sense; and keeping your wits about you. You'll have a grand time!

8. Posted by ray672 (Budding Member 9 posts) 43w

Quoting jasminewilliam

You must carry all the necessary things with such as cellphone, money, clothes. And you must learn how to ask to people properly.

what do you mean my asking people properly?? All those necesarry things will be on my backpack which I will be having on me at all times i think, or maybe i will drop it off in the hotel.

9. Posted by ray672 (Budding Member 9 posts) 43w

Quoting berner256

I learned two things on my first trip overseas: Protect my passport; protect my feet.

No passport: No travel. Injure your feet; and walking can be a real pain.

Back then, I put my passport in my bag; and it was stolen in a Paris hostel while I was sleeping. Lucky there was a U.S. embassy there to replace it. Later, I rode a moped with flip-flops and broke the big toe of my right foot. Stupid.

Your passport is your most valuable possession while traveling. You can't get back into your country without it. In some places, such as India and China, you have to produce it to check-in to accommodations. You also need it to board international flights. Sometimes you must show it to change money. The most secure place to store your passport is in a money belt. Make sure you put the passport in a plastic bag to protect it against moisture damage.

I see a lot of people walking around cities, as well as on hikes, wearing flip-flops. That might be OK for locals with feet hardened by years of walking without footwear, particularly in developing countries. But for most, it's a painful accident waiting to happen.

One more thing. It's wise to estimate how much money you plan to use on a given day. Then place it in a secure pocket or two. That way, there's no need to flash a wad of cash, which could make you an inviting target for thieves. It also pays to be alert, particularly in crowded places such as bus stations. You don't want to be a victim.

There's no need to be fearful about travel. All it takes is a little common sense; and keeping your wits about you. You'll have a grand time!

I see people putting a lot of importance on the passport, i was thinking of simply keeping it my deepest corner of the backpack or something I'm gonna bf travelling with my nike shoes i use for normal walks and stuff like that in Norway, it should be good enough i think? maybe it will be too hot? Also considering buying flip flops when I arrive there, so when i am supposed to go on hikes and long tours, i can switch to the nike shoes, and when am casually walking around, then I will use the flip flops ? And I will be staying in a hotel in Chiang Mai where they do have a safe.

10. Posted by berner256 (Travel Guru 528 posts) 43w

Your Nike shoes are fine. You can go anywhere with them. Buy your flip-flops in Thailand; they are inexpensive. I always carry a pair in my bag, since the floors in some places, including bathrooms, can be nasty. An alternative are non-leather sandals. They may be heavier than flip-flops, but they are better for wading through wetlands, or jumping off boats into the water, particularly in places where there is no dock. Flip-flops have a habit of floating away.

Personally, I would never leave my passport in a bag. It's always on me, in a money belt, or in a secure hidden pocket. If there's a hotel safe, I would consider putting it in there for safekeeping.

If you're leaving cash for safekeeping with hotel reception, make sure that you and the clerk count it carefully before putting it in a sealed envelope in the hotel safe. Make sure you both count it when it comes out. The amount should be correct. Once, for me, it wasn't.

When you're in Thailand, buy a small, cheap daypack to take on hikes, leaving your bigger backpack at the hotel or hostel. That way, you can easily carry your flip-flops, raincoat, snacks, drinks, whatever that you might need for the day. The daypack should be small enough to stuff in your regular backpack. I use a waterproof Aquapac that I roll up and put into my regular bag. For me, waterproof is the way to go, since I do a lot of hiking in all sorts of environments. It's also useful on the water, particularly when seas are rough. Hope this helps.