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1. Posted by UnknownWanderer (Budding Member 11 posts) 27w

first let me introduce myself and share some background about myself, in hopes that it will help.

My name is Jeremy, i'll be turning 25 come April 1st. i work in retail and i have been dreaming about traveling for most of my life and iv'e finally started to really take it seriously. I am planning for a long term trip from 2-4 years from now. honestly i'm not that smart, spent of my schooling in special education classes, but i am trying to fix that by studying and going for my GED. i am coming to understand what i want to do in my life and that is to travel for few years. most likely solo travel,since i am use to being alone. i want to see the world. i want meet new people and break out of my shell. this dream i am working towards is going to be hard, and its going to take me abit longer than most, but its something i want and need to do. i have little to no support from family, and i have no friends. so this going to be rough.

please be blunt and honest with me.

I'm looking for some advice on planning a long term adventure.

I am kind of at a loss on how to start out on planning. this entire world of traveling is new to me. its both exciting and scary.

whatever tips/advice you could share, I would be very grateful.

like how much money i'll need, in general. I'm use to living without out much.so i am going for a shoestring budget. I don't really know what i want to see or where to go. because i don't know whats out there, but i am googling i have add a few places on the trip planner on here but i am still figuring it out

lodging wise i am perfectly ok with sleeping under the stars in just about any weather except hot. i'm good with hostels. from what i have read, you get to meet new people there.

food. i don't eat much, i might eat one or two small meals through out the day, but i want to try some of the local foods of places i will be visiting.

2. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4808 posts) 27w

The thing with long-term travel is that in many ways, it's not something you can really plan "for". You need money, you need the desire to go do it, and then when you're out there, you need to be able to make decisions while on the road. Continuously planning the next week or two, because that is doable. And continuously evaluating if you're still doing what you want to be doing, or if not, deciding how you want to bend things around until it is.

Once you've picked a country to start with, I strongly recommend getting a lonely planet for that country, and devouring it. Both for the practical info about accommodation, transport, etc, and for the large picture overview of what all the country has to offer. Do not blindly follow their recommendations, or make a checklist of everything you want to see, but do be aware of the different regions and what all they have to offer.

Long term travel has a rhythm to it; a much slower pace than vacationing. Most everyone needs downtime, recovery time, time to assimilate recent experiences, to recharge and figure out what next. Long term travel needs to be sustainable. For this, you'll need to build habits you don't have yet, and which you won't have any idea about until you're actually out there, doing it.

There are many places where it's easy to get started with discovering how you can do long term travel, with lots of handholding and excellent infrastructure available. Thailand is a popular choice due to both being relatively cheap, and very well trodden. Personally when I started I found even Thailand too scary, and opted for Australia and New Zealand. Which are indeed also absolutely excellent places to start. You'll speak the language, you'll find a lot that's recognizable in the culture (but don't assume you'll know it all; culture shock can definitely still happen even there), but at the same time you'll still be away from the cares, expectations and other constraints of life at home. Added to this, both offer a Working Holiday Visa (WHV) or equivalent which'll allow you to stay in the country for a year and work, earning money to offset their high cost of living. (New Zealand WHV for Americans, Australian Work and Holiday Visa for Americans).

There'll be a lot of romantic notions of roughing it and sleeping under the stars which you'll need to ditch, as they're just not practical. (I remember having them myself, thinking I could just go hike "across" New Zealand, without any real preparation or notion what a massive logistical operation would be needed to make that plan possible. I still ended up doing several multi-day hikes, months later, and have Te Araroa (which back then only existed as a vague plan) on my bucket list, but I needed to do a whole lot of facing reality when I first arrived there.)

If you can't imagine doing it at home for practical reasons, it's probably just as unfeasible abroad.

Hostels, however, are absolutely feasible, and a major piece of the excellent backpacker infrastructure which Australia and New Zealand provide. Hanging out in their lounges, cooking in their kitchens (buy food at the supermarket, store it in the hostel fridge), you'll get to talking with plenty of fellow backpackers. Depending on your own personality, you might even make lifelong friends, but don't count on it. Still, it's easy to at least not feel "lonely", and get all the social contact you care for. Particularly if you follow a common route (such as along the east coast of Australia, or around the South Island of New Zealand), you'll probably bump into plenty fellow backpackers again and again over the months, and can get to know them pretty well, far beyond the standard initial "where are you going, where have you been, what would you recommend?" conversations. When money is tight, you can sleep 12+ to a room in the dodgier type of hostel for AUD $20/night. When you have some more money to your name, you'll learn to appreciate the small 4-bed dorms in YHAs with high chances of no one snoring (and, in low season, sometimes having the entire room to yourself for a night), or maybe even splurge on the occasional private room.

So, yes, money. In the end it all comes down to that.
Count on AUD $80/day as a minimum budget for Australia. (Do your own conversion.) New Zealand will be about 10% cheaper than that, but you'll also earn less when there. You'll want a buffer of at least four months worth of money when going there, so you can travel around a bit at first and get your bearings. It'll take time to find a job, and more time still after that before your first paycheck comes in. More money than that is definitely better.
Don't expect to earn more than you spend while travelling. Work on a WHV is a way to stretch your money, not a way to really save up. (There's exceptions, but most involve working so much that the travelling aspect gets completely buried, and really what's the point of that? Generally speaking, saving up money is best done at home.)

It's good to have a rough itinerary of where all you'd like to see, but treat it as a rough guideline at best. Be flexible enough to follow the wind, tips and recommendations from fellow travellers, or your own gut feeling. If a place appeals to you, stay longer, and get to know it better. Hostels frequently offer cleaning jobs (2-3 hours a day) in exchange for a free bed to anyone intending to stay more than three weeks An absolutely excellent way of stretching your money, that.

Develop a travelling routine, learn what it takes to feel comfortably at home anywhere. (For me it's a book and a cup of tea.) Once you have a routine, once you understand the rhythm, than the entire world opens up for you. Other countries will have different modes of transport, different food cultures, different types of accommodation, languages you don't speak, scary diseases, unknown cultural norms, and/or poverty to such a degree that you not only can't work there, but become a rich target. But these will all be individual problems you can feel confident about tackling, based on understanding what you need to be able to keep going indefinitely.

[ Edit: Edited on 18-Mar-2016, at 11:15 by Sander ]

3. Posted by UnknownWanderer (Budding Member 11 posts) 27w

Thank you Sander for your great reply. I'll have to reread it a few time for everything to sink in.

iv'e been looking at different threads on here and came across one about wwoof. wwoof is starting to look like something i would want to try. it could at least give me a good idea on how i would do traveling in a different country, before i go all out.

i'll definitely rethink roughing it, but knowing my self. i would still probably try,for awhile at least but i'll take what you said here to heart "There'll be a lot of romantic notions of roughing it and sleeping under the stars which you'll need to ditch, as they're just not practical. (I remember having them myself, thinking I could just go hike "across" New Zealand, without any real preparation or notion what a massive logistical operation would be needed to make that plan possible. I still ended up doing several multi-day hikes, months later, and have Te Araroa (which back then only existed as a vague plan) on my bucket list, but I needed to do a whole lot of facing reality when I first arrived there.)"

Hostels, seem like a lot fun, but i have the habit of shying way. its something i will look further into. if i can break away from my shyness and talk to people, i think that would make traveling more enjoyable.

budgeting and visa are going to be the hardest things for me understand and work out, which is why i am waiting few years .

I'll definitely save this,i fine it eye opening and meaningful"Develop a travelling routine, learn what it takes to feel comfortably at home anywhere. (For me it's a book and a cup of tea.) Once you have a routine, once you understand the rhythm, than the entire world opens up for you. Other countries will have different modes of transport, different food cultures, different types of accommodation, languages you don't speak, scary diseases, unknown cultural norms, and/or poverty to such a degree that you not only can't work there, but become a rich target. But these will all be individual problems you can feel confident about tackling, based on understanding what you need to be able to keep going indefinitely."

4. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4808 posts) 27w

Quoting UnknownWanderer

Hostels, seem like a lot fun, but i have the habit of shying way. its something i will look further into. if i can break away from my shyness and talk to people, i think that would make traveling more enjoyable.

This is actually something I had, too. I'm very much an introvert, and never much learned how to be social before I started travelling. Hostel life helped tremendously with that. You don't have to be the one to start a conversation - just be around, be approachable (make a point of it not to sit in the tv room, but rather in the tv-free lounge!), and conversations will happen. Everyone else is also a stranger to everyone else, but everyone also immediately has something in common, the desire to be travelling, and the joy of being out and about.

budgeting and visa are going to be the hardest things for me understand and work out, which is why i am waiting few years .

For visas, as an American you have very few choices for countries where it's easy to work. Australia, New Zealand and Canada, and I think that's about it. At least for WHV-like things, regular work visas are of course available for many more places, but the requirements for them are also much more hassle. Everywhere else, you just go on a tourist visa (or most often they're even visa-free), usually with a maximum stay limit of three months. Something to research, of course, but easy to do, just look at them country-by-country as you decide to go there.
For the WHVs, it's a fair bit of reading, but not actually all that hard. The links I gave above should contain everything that's needed to know for Australia and New Zealand. Once you're ready to go, the application process is a few easy online forms, a payment (couple of hundred dollars), and the approval will usually come in very shortly (a matter of weeks at most).

Budgetting can be hard. There's a big upfront payment for the flight, there's travel insurance, and then there's costs while travelling. That AUD $80/day figure I gave is a useful base, but can vary a lot based on travel style (of which you of course have no idea at all yet right now). Most backpackers who watch their budget, but aren't too frugal, end up spending around that much. That budget would cover a bed in a small dorm room in a decent quality hostel, buying supermarket food to cook your own meals, and public transport to get from destination to destination about once a week. Of course, you can go eat out, do lots of activities, and spend your evenings partying away, and spend three times as much without trying hard. But generally, if you keep track of your expenses and don't splurge, that figure should be quite doable. So if you aim for that, then it simply becomes a matter of arithmetic - how many days do you want to spend there as an absolute minimum even if you don't manage to find any work at all, and how much slack are you comfortable with giving yourself to find a job. It's probably worth having a separate sum of money next to what you've budgetted; so one wad of money you intend to spend on the road, and one you keep back for emergencies, to use to get back home, and/or to use if work just isn't happening for any reason.

Anyway, I'm glad that my reply was useful, and I hope this helps some more. Good luck with researching and learning and making decisions! :) Oh, and don't overthink things too much. At some point you just have to go and accept that you can't ever really be completely prepared for everything, and that you'll just have to face the actual experiences in order to learn how to deal with them. It's really not all that scary, and the world is filled with friendly fellow travellers who're more than happy to help you out if and when you need it.

5. Posted by hasbeen (Respected Member 602 posts) 27w

This might help regarding visas Wikipedia but it is only a guide - if a country takes your fancy, go to the website for the embassy that country & check out the requirements.
Happy travels
Steve

6. Posted by UnknownWanderer (Budding Member 11 posts) 27w

just wanted to say thanks again.. you gave me a lot of things to think about and a lot of great info.

making decisions and becoming more independent, is some what scary but also exciting. something i do look forward to.

i believe i would need to get some kind of degree from college before i could work in a different countries?. but its something i'm already working towards.

7. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4808 posts) 27w

For the WHV: No, you don't need any kind of degree. The only requirements to be eligible for a WHV are being aged 18-30 (inclusive) at the time you apply, not having used one before, and having enough money to support yourself. Oh, and apparently for the Australian W&HV for Americans, you must've finished high school:

If you are from the United States of America, you must hold a secondary school (high school) qualification.‚Äč

The New Zealand WHV doesn't require even that.

Of course, a degree (and/or work experience) will make it easier to actually find (some types of) work when there, but they're not a requirement for the visa; that's the great thing about that particular visa. (For regular work visas, different countries have all kinds of different requirements, and a degree can definitely be one of them.)

[ Edit: Edited on 19-Mar-2016, at 06:55 by Sander ]

8. Posted by OldPro (Respected Member 212 posts) 27w

Sander has given you some very good advice, none of which I would disagree with.

You wrote, "please be blunt and honest with me.", and I am going to do that. There are some aspects of long term travel worth knowing about that can seem negative or discouraging but nevertheless they are reality.

First, I would say be careful who you listen to. You can find all kinds of blogs with names like, 'The Ultimate Guide to Backpacking the World'. It seems like anyone who has ever left home for a couple of months and followed a tour plan using a RTW airline ticket, thinks they know all there is to know about backpacking and world travel. Most in fact get half of what they write wrong.

For example, you will note that Sander has made a point of saying you can't plan long term travel. Many people who planned their months of 2 weeks in A and 1 week in B, etc. using a RTW ticket with all flights pre-planned, would disagree with Sander. To me, the difference is they were tourists who planned a tour. All they did was string vacations together. A traveller doesn't approach travel that way.

You can plan a tour but you cannot plan an adventure. By definition, an adventure requires 2 things. Risk and the unknown. Those are what the tourist tries to avoid by planning as much as they can.

When you meet other travellers, they can be a big help to you with ideas and information. They can also be a big problem. Sadly, the most common place for a backpacker to have things stolen is in a hostel by other backpackers. So while you want to meet others, you also need to keep your wits about you.

You should also keep in mind that if they are on their first long term trip, they may believe what they are telling you but that doesn't necessarily make it true. For example, how to handle accessing your money in the bank while travelling is a common area where people get it wrong and think they have got it right. Anyone telling you to use a pre-paid cash card for example instead of credit/debit cards, has got it wrong.

Then there is work to 'fund further travel'. That very rarely works out the way people hope. Again, Sander has given you the real story. "Work on a WHV is a way to stretch your money, not a way to really save up." IF you find work, you can stretch your time in a place but you are very unlikely to earn enough to do more than just live on for as long as you do the job.

Another aspect of work is that if you are working, you are not travelling. While there is a lot of value in living in a place for a while, you do have to consider how much of your time you expect to spend doing that and how happy you will be doing it. You can work at home, why travel to somewhere else to do it? Almost invariably, any job you can get while on the road will pay less than you could have earned at home. So my personal preference is to not work at all. Work two jobs at home and save your money. Then enjoy your travels without needing to work.

Regarding finding work if you do want to try, consider how much time you are willing to work for. Some people think they are going to find repeated jobs for 2-6 weeks and then move on. How realistic is that? How easy would it be to find a job where you live, for 2-6 weeks and then find another one and another one after that? Someone who goes to Australia with a WHV expecting to work 3 months picking grapes may indeed find a job doing that or an office job for 9 months in Sydney. But they aren't going to find 6 different jobs for a couple of week each in 6 different places.

Also regarding work, you mention WWOOFing. There are other similar organizations as well but you need to know that because they exist does not mean it is legal for you to participate in them. WWOOF exists in the USA but it is illegal for any non-US citizen without a work Visa to participate. In Canada, it is legal for someone on a tourist visa to participate for up to 4 weeks. Each country's immigration laws differ in this regard and it is up to YOU to determine if you can legally do something or not. Organizations such as WWOOF sell memberships and don't necessarily make it clear on their websites what the legal requirements are. The WWOOF USA website at one time suggested LYING to US Border Agents if you were coming to the USA and planned to WWOOF.
So be careful about work and what is legal. Being caught and deported for working illegally is not much fun I would think. And again, don't rely on what someone tells you that you can do. Do your own research and make your own decision.

Then there is money. Again, Sander has given you a reasonable idea of a typical backpacker budget which covers a hostel bed, supermarket food and the odd beer. For Europe, the equivalent would be around 50-60 Euros per day in W. Europe and about 10 less in E. European countries. For SEA, you can get by on quite a bit less. But that brings up what to me is important to consider when thinking about money. I personally don't happen to have any interest in SEA. So how cheap it is really isn't relevant to me at all. I get really annoyed when people say, 'go to SEA, it's so cheap.', as if that was the only thing that mattered. I go where I am interested in going, not where I can survive for longer on less money. If you want to visit Paris then you have to have the money to visit Paris, not the money to visit Bangkok.

So don't let cost become so important that you lose sight of why you wanted to travel in the first place. I would rather enjoy 4 months in places that interest me than survive for 8 months in places I have little or no interest in. Longer is not necessarily better.

In travel as in many things, less is more. That refers to how many places you try to visit in a given amount of time. It isn't a race and there is no prize for quantity. The less you move, the more time you spend IN places seeing/doing things and not in BETWEEN places. What's more, as a general rule you can figure that every day actually spent moving will cost double what a day spent IN a place will cost. So move less, spend less is the case there.

In long term travel, you do tend to move less often. I like to spend a week or more in a place as a general rule. But that is a general rule, I've arrived in places and been more than happy to leave within a day.

Winging it gives you the freedom to get up each morning and say, 'so what will I do today? Stay or move on?' That is the true freedom of travel in my opinion.

Sander has also advised you, "At some point you just have to go and accept that you can't ever really be completely prepared for everything, and that you'll just have to face the actual experiences in order to learn how to deal with them." I agree completely with that. Just plan to go and pick A. Beyond that, things will happen.

For an example of how a long term unplanned trip can go (although I would not suggest it is typical), try reading this : https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/forums/gap-year-round-the-world-travel/topics/unplanned-travel

9. Posted by UnknownWanderer (Budding Member 11 posts) 26w

Quoting OldPro

Sander has given you some very good advice, none of which I would disagree with.

You wrote, "please be blunt and honest with me.", and I am going to do that. There are some aspects of long term travel worth knowing about that can seem negative or discouraging but nevertheless they are reality.

First, I would say be careful who you listen to. You can find all kinds of blogs with names like, 'The Ultimate Guide to Backpacking the World'. It seems like anyone who has ever left home for a couple of months and followed a tour plan using a RTW airline ticket, thinks they know all there is to know about backpacking and world travel. Most in fact get half of what they write wrong.

For example, you will note that Sander has made a point of saying you can't plan long term travel. Many people who planned their months of 2 weeks in A and 1 week in B, etc. using a RTW ticket with all flights pre-planned, would disagree with Sander. To me, the difference is they were tourists who planned a tour. All they did was string vacations together. A traveller doesn't approach travel that way.

You can plan a tour but you cannot plan an adventure. By definition, an adventure requires 2 things. Risk and the unknown. Those are what the tourist tries to avoid by planning as much as they can.

When you meet other travellers, they can be a big help to you with ideas and information. They can also be a big problem. Sadly, the most common place for a backpacker to have things stolen is in a hostel by other backpackers. So while you want to meet others, you also need to keep your wits about you.

You should also keep in mind that if they are on their first long term trip, they may believe what they are telling you but that doesn't necessarily make it true. For example, how to handle accessing your money in the bank while travelling is a common area where people get it wrong and think they have got it right. Anyone telling you to use a pre-paid cash card for example instead of credit/debit cards, has got it wrong.

Then there is work to 'fund further travel'. That very rarely works out the way people hope. Again, Sander has given you the real story. "Work on a WHV is a way to stretch your money, not a way to really save up." IF you find work, you can stretch your time in a place but you are very unlikely to earn enough to do more than just live on for as long as you do the job.

Another aspect of work is that if you are working, you are not travelling. While there is a lot of value in living in a place for a while, you do have to consider how much of your time you expect to spend doing that and how happy you will be doing it. You can work at home, why travel to somewhere else to do it? Almost invariably, any job you can get while on the road will pay less than you could have earned at home. So my personal preference is to not work at all. Work two jobs at home and save your money. Then enjoy your travels without needing to work.

Regarding finding work if you do want to try, consider how much time you are willing to work for. Some people think they are going to find repeated jobs for 2-6 weeks and then move on. How realistic is that? How easy would it be to find a job where you live, for 2-6 weeks and then find another one and another one after that? Someone who goes to Australia with a WHV expecting to work 3 months picking grapes may indeed find a job doing that or an office job for 9 months in Sydney. But they aren't going to find 6 different jobs for a couple of week each in 6 different places.

Also regarding work, you mention WWOOFing. There are other similar organizations as well but you need to know that because they exist does not mean it is legal for you to participate in them. WWOOF exists in the USA but it is illegal for any non-US citizen without a work Visa to participate. In Canada, it is legal for someone on a tourist visa to participate for up to 4 weeks. Each country's immigration laws differ in this regard and it is up to YOU to determine if you can legally do something or not. Organizations such as WWOOF sell memberships and don't necessarily make it clear on their websites what the legal requirements are. The WWOOF USA website at one time suggested LYING to US Border Agents if you were coming to the USA and planned to WWOOF.
So be careful about work and what is legal. Being caught and deported for working illegally is not much fun I would think. And again, don't rely on what someone tells you that you can do. Do your own research and make your own decision.

Then there is money. Again, Sander has given you a reasonable idea of a typical backpacker budget which covers a hostel bed, supermarket food and the odd beer. For Europe, the equivalent would be around 50-60 Euros per day in W. Europe and about 10 less in E. European countries. For SEA, you can get by on quite a bit less. But that brings up what to me is important to consider when thinking about money. I personally don't happen to have any interest in SEA. So how cheap it is really isn't relevant to me at all. I get really annoyed when people say, 'go to SEA, it's so cheap.', as if that was the only thing that mattered. I go where I am interested in going, not where I can survive for longer on less money. If you want to visit Paris then you have to have the money to visit Paris, not the money to visit Bangkok.

So don't let cost become so important that you lose sight of why you wanted to travel in the first place. I would rather enjoy 4 months in places that interest me than survive for 8 months in places I have little or no interest in. Longer is not necessarily better.

In travel as in many things, less is more. That refers to how many places you try to visit in a given amount of time. It isn't a race and there is no prize for quantity. The less you move, the more time you spend IN places seeing/doing things and not in BETWEEN places. What's more, as a general rule you can figure that every day actually spent moving will cost double what a day spent IN a place will cost. So move less, spend less is the case there.

In long term travel, you do tend to move less often. I like to spend a week or more in a place as a general rule. But that is a general rule, I've arrived in places and been more than happy to leave within a day.

Winging it gives you the freedom to get up each morning and say, 'so what will I do today? Stay or move on?' That is the true freedom of travel in my opinion.

Sander has also advised you, "At some point you just have to go and accept that you can't ever really be completely prepared for everything, and that you'll just have to face the actual experiences in order to learn how to deal with them." I agree completely with that. Just plan to go and pick A. Beyond that, things will happen.

For an example of how a long term unplanned trip can go (although I would not suggest it is typical), try reading this : https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/forums/gap-year-round-the-world-travel/topics/unplanned-travel

Thank you for your reply.

I want to explore places like Iceland/Greenland, Norway,Sweden,Denmark,Finland ( try meet the dudsones ),Russia and pretty much anywhere else that catches my eye. i want to see more rural and natural side of the world, i want see those amazing landscapes. i want see the Buddhist temples in Nepal and sit and talk to them. i had a history teacher in high school who traveled there and she told us stories and showed us photos of there and i was completely memorized by it.. i want visit countries that i have never even heard of and learn about them.

i have always wanted to see world,but i simply saw it has a unattainable dream, until now. i'm turning 25 soon and all i could see for my future was working and coming home every day. the same routine, but i realized recently it not so unattainable as i thought. my family thinks its impossible for me, but they'll see. iv'e come to understand that working and settling in one place is really not for me.

i am extremely dumb when it comes to what is really out there, the countries, the people and culture. i want to experience the good and the bad.

i feel like i just want to wander about, but if i want to travel for a short or long period of time i need to try and plan it out a bit, mostly financially. to fine away to stretch it out for awhile. i work two part time jobs in retail, the money sucks but its better than nothing. i am slowly saving, iv'e given up some of my bad habits, and most of other things that i enjoy to save up. after about year and half so far i'm at about 2 thousand.
i don't know how long i want to send in anyone one, i think how long i would stay would be determined mostly on how much i like it.

my impression of you and sanders, you both seem wise and experienced, but i will be careful on who i listen to.

thanks for your warning about WWOOFing, iv'e come across few postings about that and the website workaway
something i'll look more into for sure. working/volunteering aboard seemed like a great away to experience that country.

your post on working made a lot of sense, i came across this post and found it very informative and it gives you alot to think about. from this i found that it is better idea to work at home rather than to try and fine work aboard. https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/forums/travel-on-a-shoestring/topics/work-to-fund-travel-16cf586a-14b1-42b3-aa1e-753b4ad36fe3

[ Edit: Edited on 20-Mar-2016, at 08:29 by UnknownWanderer ]

10. Posted by OldPro (Respected Member 212 posts) 26w

I am sitting here chuckling to myself UnknownWanderer. The post you link at the end of your response, was written by me.

Here is another thought for you if I may offer it. Travel is not likely to change your life. Contrary to what some people seem to think, if you are unhappy with your life as it is, escaping it temporarily isn't likely to make any difference when you return home after your money runs out.

If you want your 'normal' life to change then you have to make changes in that 'normal' life. I believe that everyone has until they are around 35 to do as they please. Somewhere around that age though they have to have a path they intend to follow. If working in retail isn't the path that is going to make you happy, then the sooner you start on a different path the better.

I get the feeling you may want to think about that when I read, "i'm turning 25 soon and all i could see for my future was working and coming home every day. the same routine, but i realized recently it not so unattainable as i thought. my family thinks its impossible for me, but they'll see. iv'e come to understand that working and settling in one place is really not for me."

The question would be, then what is for you? The answer is not likely to be found in travel. Rather than saying working and settling in one place is really not for me, it might simply be that working in retail for the rest of your life simply isn't for you.