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Easter in Germany

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1. Posted by Alo-Joe (Budding Member 2 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Easter Sunday 2018

Can really use some guidance and suggestions. On a whim, we purchased tickets for Germany . We will be landing in Frankfurt on Easter Sunday (April 1) at 9:00 am.
We have two weeks.

We are really confused what to do and where to go Easter Sunday and Monday. We will have a rental car, and were planning on driving to Rothenburg odt for two nights. then continue on our way. Since everything will most likely be closed, and the tours do not start until April 8 we are having second thoughts.

Question 1 - Where can we go and experience some sort of Easter holiday? A festival - a market - nice dinner- church celebration

We are planning on driving to Munich, Fussen, Salzburg and any other town that peaks our interest along the way. Which leads to our other question.

Are making hotel reservations in advance a absolute necessity, at this time of the year?

Thank you so much for your help.

2. Posted by Kathrin_E (Respected Member 178 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Church celebrations take place during the Easter night - in most catholic churches late on Saturday evening at 10 or 11 p.m. or midnight, in most protestant churches at the crack of dawn, beginning before sunrise. Then there will be a festive holiday service on Sunday morning, usually at 10 a.m. Which means you will miss them all. The services on Easter Monday are usually minor and a quiet matter.

"Everything closed" means shops - well, to some, shops are everything;-) Restaurants, cafes and pubs, sights and attractions will be open and can be expected to be very busy.

Easter markets are not as onmnipresent as Christmas markets. However, there is one in Nuremberg in Hauptmarkt that seems to be quite big, traditional, and worthwhile (disclaimer: I have never been!)

Since you are aiming at the Franconia region, there is one beautiful tradition that you should look for: the Easter fountains, in particular in Franconian Switzerland, the hilly area north of Nuremberg. The biggest one is the one in Bieberbach, but there are more than 200 of them in almost every village. You'll have a car, which is a big advantage in this rural region (and by the way, very beautiful landscape, and famous for its countless local breweries...) To give you an idea, here is a list with photos: http://www.fraenkische-schweiz.com/de/poi/auflistung/Osterbrunnen/Sehenswert

The Easter holidays and the time around are peak travel time - school holidays, several public holidays that save days off work, and the beginning of the warmer season so people are ready for the first outing of the year. And you are planning to visit very busy tourist destinations. Yes, in my opinion you should prebook accommodation.

3. Posted by Alo-Joe (Budding Member 2 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Thank you so much for this information

4. Posted by harbinger (Budding Member 39 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Firstly, Kathrin always gives excellent information, so follow her advice (hi, Kathrin!).

We did a similar trip a few years ago, following the so called Romantic Road from Wurzburg, and it was fabulous. Wurzburg is a Baroque gem, and although Baroque's not my thing, we still had a great time, and really enjoyed the city, particularly the museum showcasing the work of Tilman Riemenschneider, a local who is acknowledged as the consummate wood carver of the Gothic period. If you are interested in that sort of thing, then one of the joys of the region is that several small villages still have jawdropping Riemenschneider altars, which totally eclipse the couple of Riemenschneiders in major international museums such as The Cloisters in New York.

Nuremburg is one of my absolute all time favourite destinations, and offers everything that you could ask of a city - every time we visit, I discover more and like it even better. It has amazing medieval architecture (painstakingly restored after it was flattened during WWII) and fascinating 20th century history, from the rise of the Nazi Party in the 1930s, through WWII to the Nuremburg trials - the unexcitingly named Documentation Centre is housed in the complex of buildings that Hitler had designed as a showcase for his new social order, and is riveting. It is also the home of Nuremberger bratwurst - tiny fingerlike sausages that you order (and keep reordering) by the half dozen. I recall that when we were there on Easter Sunday one year, there was an amazing parade of historical fire engines ... although whether this was a 'one off' or an annual events, I can't say. It's just the sort of quirky thing you expect to find in Nuremburg. If it were me, I'd use Nuremburg (rather than Rothenburg) as your base), as there's more accommodation, and it's a central location from which to do day trips to places such as beautiful Bamberg.

I actively dislike Rothenburg-ob-der-Tauber, which I find too Disneyfied, but millions of tourists per year clearly disagree. Personally, I'd prefer to visit Dinkelsbuhl or Nordlingen, which offer a similar, less airbrushed experience, and might be a good alternative over the busy Easter period.

Further south, Augsburg is a lovely place, and well worth visiting for the historic Fuggerei (a medieval and very picturesque social housing complex). Ulm - with its soaring Minster, which is still the highest steeple in the world, and also notable as being the birthplace of Einstein - is also well worth a stop.

We ended the trip in Bertchesgaden, which is astonishingly beautiful. The obvious attraction is the Eagle's Nest (Hitler's mountain retreat) which was closed when we visited, but even if it is, then there are heaps of other wonderful things to do in that area. Don't miss Koenigsee, which is a stunningly beautiful lake, and have a drink and/or a meal in the Hotel Watzmann, which received an official award from the US Military after the war in recognition of its contribution to servicemen's morale.

I think the gist of this is clear: there is so much to see and do in this region that you really can't go wrong: just identify your particular interests and do a little upfront research. And - as Kathrin so rightly says - it would be wise to book accommodation up front, given that it's school holidays.

5. Posted by ykas25 (Budding Member 19 posts) 1w Star this if you like it!

Hi Alo-Joe,

You cannot afford to miss the Boattrip from Rüdesheim till Koblenz . This stretch on Rhein is a fascinating experience to a UNESCO Protected Heritage site....that You remember for life time...

Plan Your driving Iterinary following the "Romantische Strasse" that would lead You to some beautiful locales ending in Fussen.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romantic_Road

Hope it helps and wishing You a good and enjoyable trip.....

Cheers!!