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What languages do you Speak?

Travel Forums General Talk What languages do you Speak?

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31. Posted by angela_ (Respected Member 1732 posts) 11y

Danish is pretty similar to Icelandic, but Danish is a bit simpler than Icelandic. Icelandic has been mostly the same for centuries but Danish has evolved.
We start learning Danish at age 12 and learn English at 10.

32. Posted by MartinH (Full Member 67 posts) 11y

I'm an ignorant brit, so I know English and I last did french about 6 years ago and spanish 8 years ago in school. I would like to do spanish again, all I seem to remember is "No entiendo!"

I do however understand body language and dog.
Dog is quite simple,

Barking at the back door, I want to go out.
Barking outside the backdoor, I want to come in.
Rolling on back, tickle my belly.
Lick empty bowl, feed me.
Poking head in to my room and then running out, Hurry I really need to go toilet and you better follow me before it goes on the carpet.

body language is actually something I'm quite serious about, I'm very perceptive of peoples actions, stances and am always analysing.
Just yesterday a salesman told me he couldnt do a deal and never made eye contact whilst saying it...speaks volumes without ever saying a word, its also a universal language... generally!

I wish I wasn't such a lazy git at school!

33. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

Quoting MartinH

body language is actually something I'm quite serious about, I'm very perceptive of peoples actions, stances and am always analysing.
Just yesterday a salesman told me he couldnt do a deal and never made eye contact whilst saying it...speaks volumes without ever saying a word, its also a universal language... generally!

They say that only 7% of communication is the spoken word. The other 93% being body language and also voice tone. If you think about it, man has communicated for a long, long time before any complex language was developed.

When I travel, smiling, hand gestures, etc. really take me a long way.

Like Martin, body language is a very important way for me to read another person. That's one reason why I much prefer face-to-face meetings than phone talk.

PS---Sounds like your DOG has you very well trained

34. Posted by FionaNZ (Respected Member 903 posts) 11y

Yes I am one of those ignorant travellers who only speak English too.. have managed to get by so far though, agree the hand gestures & body language & making a general fool of oneself usually do seem to work. Must admit to giving the traffic on the Southern Motorway in Auckland a giggle at the moment though, as I am playing a learn Spanish cd on the way too & from work & talking to myself
However I suppose they may prefer that to me blasting out Metallica
or Jet

35. Posted by MelesMeles (Full Member 137 posts) 11y

I'm lazy too :) My first language is Estonian (and I understand a bit of Finnish thanks to that). Then there's English that I've learned at school for 9 years. I can understand it, but aint so good with expressing myself. At the moment I'm studying Russian (as second foreign language at school) and looking forward to Finnish courses at summer.

MartinH, thanks for the insight about dogs ;)

36. Posted by Miska (Budding Member 29 posts) 11y

Quoting Travel100

Quoting Miska

Hi Travel100, hi Lucy55
Can I disturb your dialogue?

I am trying to speak english, deutsch (german language), italian, hungarian and understand almost all of the slavic languages (czech,polish, slovenish...)

Miska

Wow that's amazing, to understand so many languages. I assume Slovakian is your native language. What language is the easiest to understand for a Slovakian? Czech?

When you say you have to learn 2 languages in school. Does English have to be one of the two?

Hi Travel100!
Yes, slovakian is my native language and the easiest language to understand is czech- Czecoslovakia was separated in 1993 into Czech and Slovakia so were one country before (this is the reason why we understand czech language so good...very good!)

Your next question-english is one of the two, the second can be deutsch(german l.) or french, for example

37. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 11y

Although I grew up in French-dominated east Montreal, I speak English first and French second. Well, Quebecois, anyway. I still get confused at times when speaking to someone from France. The expressions can throw me for a loop! I can also understand a little (and I mean a little) Italian, although I know a choice variety of swear words.

38. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 11y

I speak English and Mandarin fluently. I speak Hokkien and Teochew, but I understand it better. I am trying to get the hang of Cantonese. I learnt Italian a few years ago, so I can read and write a little, though I'm a little rusty on that. Learnt French for 10 months, can get by with the basics, I think. Can count 1-10 in Spanish and pronounce the names of Spanish footballers. .

39. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 11y

As well as English (obviously), I can speak

  • Gaelic (being Irish)
  • French (relatively good although getting rusty from lack of use)
  • German (ditto)
  • Italian (I'm in intermediate classes at the moment)

I know basic words to get by in Spanish. Italian and Spanish seem to be quite similar so that helps a bit.

I love languages - they are so interesting, and everytime I visit somewhere new I wish I could speak the language. I agree with what Travel 100 was saying in a related thread about admiring ppl who can master more than one language. (especially English!! its one of the hardest to learn, i would think).

I'm too lazy to master any others but it is nice to be able to have enough of a language to get by when you visit somewhere, and most ppl appreciate any effort that you make to communicate in their language.

40. Posted by dramaqueen (Budding Member 14 posts) 11y

I speak English and french (I did GCSE and A Level) I am intending to tutor french to gcse students next year alongside my studies.