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EU Constitution Vote, will France & Holland vote Yes or NO?

Travel Forums Europe EU Constitution Vote, will France & Holland vote Yes or NO?

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21. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 11y

Quoting Travel100

My prediction is that the Dutch will also vote "NO" on Wednesday. I'd say around 55% (or slightly more) will vote NO.

The latest polls predict: 59% NO and 41% yes, too bad.......I hope this changes

22. Posted by Cupcake (Travel Guru 8468 posts) 11y

The Dutch also voted no...
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/06/01/dutch.poll/index.html
How does this effect a EU Constitution now? Is it possible without all the countries involved?

23. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

Basically, as you said a few days ago, nothing actually changes from the way it is now. BUT they really cannot go forward with the constitution.
ALL 25 countries had to ratify it, and in 4 days 2 countries have voted "NO" by wide margins (and that may even cause a "snowball effect" in other votes). It will make it more difficilt for Europe to act in unison.

Maybe they can work on a "new & improved" constitution, but this one appears doomed.

I wonder who votes next?

24. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

EU CONSTITUTION:

• Permanent EU president to replace six-month rotating presidencies

• EU foreign minister to conduct common foreign policy

• Qualified majority voting in most areas with vetoes limited

• Commission to be reduced to 15 with 10 non-voting associates

• Policy areas covered by European Parliament up from 34 to 70

• Legally binding Charter of Fundamental Rights

25. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

The good news of the "NO" votes on the EU constitution (for us):

1.00 Euro = 1.21909 USD

A littlw while ago when speculators realized that the EU constitution probably would be voted down (and especially since the French Vote on Sunday) the Dollar has rallied 10% against the Euro.

Not too long ago 1.00 = 1.35 USD

Without the constitution it will be harder for Europe to become a united economic powerhouse.

So it means we may be able to afford to visit Europe agian .

26. Posted by Rraven (Travel Guru 5924 posts) 11y

well as you probably know by now the Dutch voted NO by a huge percentage, the outcome was to be expected but the percentage difference was a blow to the EU.

I won't lie and say I have read or understood all the ramifications of boting yes or no (yet!) but from talking to colleagues that were they given the choice they would vote No. Talking to French and Dutch working here is really interesting, they say that their countries should have voted yes , yet they didn't vote themselves , they had the opportunity to vote in the embassies but didn't

27. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin 5588 posts) 11y

Interesting Nikki, I never actually realized I could have voted in the embassy here... but should have thought of it. I probably wouldn't have voted though. It was pretty clear it was going to be a no anyway and the way the European economy is going, I think I might have voted for a no too.

Living in Norway, I can see a lot of the benefits that countries like the Netherlands lost out on when joining the EU. I think the Norwegians are pretty happy to be spared all of this right now.

It's interesting though, the whole EU was supposed to bring Europe together but if anything, it's pushing a lot of the countries apart and driving anti sentiments on all kinds of levels. Some countries love it, but the countries that have always been 'well off' seem to hate it.

It's a hard call either way but there's just so much difference between the countries (15-20% tax rates, union strength, economical growth/slowdown/recession etc. etc.), that it's much harder to bring together than originally thought!

28. Posted by Rraven (Travel Guru 5924 posts) 11y

I've heard how easy we have it since joining the EU but I have to disagree, there is so much red tape now. a colleague wanted to hire an au pair for two years, she found the perfect woman in the world to mind her children but as she lives outside the EU she can't get a visa, its disgraceful, my friend wanted her children to be more open to other cultures outside europe and when found an au pair with great experience, references and a great personality she thought she had hit the perfect match. She has been told that should she want an au pair she must hire within the EU !?! Oh I should mention that she is Spanish and that her husband in German, which is why they thought they could teach their children about Europe themselves.... also since the introduction of the euro we were supposed to have a more uniform pricing structure introduced - it hasn't and won't happen, the last time I checked Ireland was one of the most expensive places to live ( when comparing earning potential to cost of living)....

ps: apologise for all the types , i'm getting worse !!

29. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

Quoting Sam I Am

It's interesting though, the whole EU was supposed to bring Europe together but if anything, it's pushing a lot of the countries apart and driving anti sentiments on all kinds of levels. Some countries love it, but the countries that have always been 'well off' seem to hate it. I

Interesting observation. I know that during my travels through Europe almost Everyone was much happier and says everything was much cheaper before th Euro replaced their local currency.

I don't like that things have become more expensive, but it certainly is a lot simpler to manage the money situation now while traveling through Europe. I remember, back in 1998, after just arriving in Budapest late at night. I wanted to but a coke but didn't yet have the Hungarian money. I reached in my pockets and had: US dollars, Dutch giulders, German marks, Austrain shillings, Czech Koruny. And the lady at behind the counter wouldn't accept ANY of them :( (not eventhe Marks, which surprised me a little). But anyway, things are certainly simpler now, just way more expensive. Any by the way, I never did get my coke .

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