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The Value of Cultural Stereotypes

Travel Forums General Talk The Value of Cultural Stereotypes

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21. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 11y

You have a point sue. It is a fine line between stereotyping and racism, though I think racism does take it a step further.

In fact, if I had to answer the original question "What value (if any) do you see in cultural stereotypes?", I would have to say there is no value.

22. Posted by FionaNZ (Respected Member 903 posts) 11y

Well that's just it, a Sterotype is a bullsh*t generalisation of a group, culture, country.. Not all Kiwi's are the same, we may have some of the same traits but no way can we all be summed up as a whole. Generally though I think the Oz, English, Irish, NZ stereotypes of each other are more a giving each other a hard time thing, not racist

23. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

Quoting suenorris

"...Wocca states that, at one hand the the British are known to be stuffy, prim and proper but then asks the question on whether we've noticed the Brits in the Mediterranean. By this I take it he's referring to loutish behavior. So which one is it?..."

You just reversed the sequence in which my comments were made.

But, perhaps you have drawn attention to the possibility that there can be more than one stereotype for any given nationality.

Post 24 was removed by a moderator
25. Posted by remarcable (Respected Member 335 posts) 11y

I think there is some truth in stereotypes. Are there Loud ,highly opinioned, me first, superficial Americans? Sure, I even dated one of those. But say every American is that way, that just plain stupid. I can't speak for all countries, but the U.S is/was made by immigrants. Bringing along values and beliefs from their homelands. It's impossible to pin point what is a "real" American. Unless you are talking to a Native American(indians) truth be told, they were here first!

M.

26. Posted by Travel100 (Travel Guru 1556 posts) 11y

Quoting CupCake

This gives a lot of great examples...

Very interesting article, thanks for posting the link.

27. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 11y

Joz,

I really enjoyed reading that article. It was indicated in another thread that I was making a racist jibe, which I would never intentionally do. However, I must accept that sometimes it is possible to offend someone from another cultural background unwittingly, even if your comments are not directed there. Being cross-culturally sensitive is something that we should all strive for, I think.

It certainly is an interesting world we live in.

Ev

28. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

Quoting Peter

"...In fact, if I had to answer the original question "What value (if any) do you see in cultural stereotypes?", I would have to say there is no value..."

Not all stereotypes are negative. In fact, forming cultural stereotypes can be a kind of shorthand for helping an individual deal with the complexities of another culture.

29. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 11y

Quoting Wocca

Not all stereotypes are negative. In fact, forming cultural stereotypes can be a kind of shorthand for helping an individual deal with the complexities of another culture.

Hmm yeah, I can see that point. So, you might say 'Japanese people are appreciate politeness' and that helps you fit in better when in Japan. I suppose that could be called a stereotype and would be a fair assumption. You're right, I do see a value in that ..

I suppose what I don't see value in is the generalisation when it is applied too specifically. Most stereotypes of Australians for instance would only really fit half the population at the most. With such a diverse group of citizens from around the world, I think the one defining thing about Australian 'Culture' is that it is a mix of cultures if that makes any sense. At least in the cities this is largely the case.

30. Posted by Cupcake (Travel Guru 8468 posts) 11y

Quoting samsara2

Joz,

I really enjoyed reading that article. It was indicated in another thread that I was making a racist jibe, which I would never intentionally do. However, I must accept that sometimes it is possible to offend someone from another cultural background unwittingly, even if your comments are not directed there. Being cross-culturally sensitive is something that we should all strive for, I think.

It certainly is an interesting world we live in.

Ev

Ev, I think the only way we could never offend anyone is if we stopped talking/typing/reading. Something will always be misconstrewed...no matter how we try to say it. It is especailly hard with the written word. We can't see the expression on someones face, hear the difference in tone etc. top that off with the fact that some people are looking for something to be offended by....It is almost impossible not to offend someone/somehow in this global village;)

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