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Stages of Culture Shock

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1. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

There are said to be four (4) DIFFERENT STAGES OF CULTURE SHOCK...

i) HONEYMOON STAGE:

Everything is great. Nothing is wrong. You are having a wonderful time. But, this way of thinking does not normally last if the foreign visitor remains abroad & has to seriously cope with the real conditions of life. The honeymoon ends.

ii) SHOCK STAGE:

There are so many differences in this new country that you don't know how to deal with them.

The second stage is characterized by a hostile and aggressive attitude towards the host country. If you overcome this stage, you stay. If not,you leave before you reach the stage of a nervous breakdown.

iii) NEGOTIATION STAGE:

You learn to deal with the problems set before you, and try to fit them in with your own beliefs. Culture shock is lessened as the visitor succeeds in getting some knowledge of the language and begins to get around by him/herself. This is the beginning of his/her adjustment to the new cultural environment.

iv) ACCEPTANCE STAGE:

You are able to live well in the environment with the differences you are experiencing. The visitor still has difficulties but s/he adopts a different attitude. Usually in this stage, the visitor takes a superior attitude toward people of the host country. Instead of criticizing, s/he makes jokes about the people and even cracks jokes about his or her own difficulties.

S/he is now on the way to recovery

2. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 11y

The biggest culture shock I had in my (short...) travel-life was in India. The first two, three days were terrible. I came over it stayed another 3 months and now am really in love with India. Want to go back as soon as possible (am still trying to go there for my internship but Indians are not very willing to help me).

3. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

I was in northern provincial China for about a year before going to India for 4 months.

India has a very British colonial feel about it, but there were still times when I'd shake my head in disbelief at things I would see.

4. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 11y

I think when having survived a cultureshock you will appreciating that specific country more!!!!

5. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

Quoting wouterr

I think when having survived a cultureshock you will appreciating that specific country more!!!!

You are right,wouterrr .

For the first few months I was in China,I was very socially isolated.I felt quite alienated being the only foreigner in town. Of course, my Chinese counterparts did their best to welcome me warmly ...

I arrived in the middle of winter. The weather was icy cold & windy,
so the climate was quite a shock to me. Very few people spoke English, so there was linguistic shock. I was in a fairly traditional provincial area, so there was culture shock as well. I'd already been in Asia for a few months, so food wasn't really a problem.

Whenever I felt a bit downhearted, I'd ask myself "What's the alternative?" Quite often, there was none. Especially during the SARS epidemic, and many areas were in quarantine.

One of the reasons I had travelled was because I wanted to learn more about the world and myself. As humans, we are very resourceful by nature. I changed my mindset more to suit my new environment. It worked for me.

6. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 11y

My culture shock was realising shops in Holland close at 6pm instead of 9.30pm! I'm so not a morning person, so that was a problem for me initially.

7. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 11y

Quoting summer910

My culture shock was realising shops in Holland close at 6pm instead of 9.30pm! I'm so not a morning person, so that was a problem for me initially.

Obviously you were only partying in Holland, did you see any daylight when you were there???

8. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 11y

Quoting wouterrr

Obviously you were only partying in Holland, did you see any daylight when you were there???

LOL. After the initial surprise, I saw plenty of daylight, but it was a hell of a chore getting up early. Another shock was Eindhoven on a Saturday night, the streets were deserted by 7pm! It was a bit freaky.

9. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 11y

Quoting summer910

LOL. After the initial surprise, I saw plenty of daylight, but it was a hell of a chore getting up early. Another shock was Eindhoven on a Saturday night, the streets were deserted by 7pm! It was a bit freaky.

Normally all shops close at 5 pm on saturday(as you now know) and around 12 am it starts in the clubs (as you probably know). But I understand your point!!!........you know that's the reason I'd rather go to Asia.

10. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 11y

Quoting wouterrr

[quote=summer910]Normally all shops close at 5 pm on saturday(as you now know) and around 12 am it starts in the clubs (as you probably know). But I understand your point!!!........you know that's the reason I'd rather go to Asia.

Well, what are you waiting for? Hop on the next flight that's coming here!

But Holland is a lovely country. I wouldn't mind living there. The lifestyle seems very tranquil at times.