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The TP Book Club is now in session...

Travel Forums Off Topic The TP Book Club is now in session...

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181. Posted by majito (Respected Member 442 posts) 10y

If you're into pre-war travel writing check out Eric Newbys "The Last Grain Race." Its an insight into life aboard the great clipper ships that ran from the UK to South Australia in 1938 to load grain. Fully laden they then continued on eastwards on routes now followed by round the world racing yachts back to their home ports. If only such adventure existed today. Another crossing epic is Robyn Davidsons "Tracks." Its fantastic. An Aussie chick moves to Alice Springs and decides to trek across the western half of Australia to the Indian Ocean - with a few camels in tow. Also appearing regularly is an NG photographer sent to record the journey. He appears occasioanlly but doesn't really interfere with the journey. After I read Tracks I was at a friends place and the book came up in conversation. The said friends pulled a large picture book from the shelves called from Alice to the Ocean by Rick Smolan. Google this guy. He's the "A day in the life of" photographer. This book is a photo-journal of part of Robyn Davidsons journey. It took me 12 months to get a copy on the internet. It became an obsession. It was worth it. Tracks created a legend (or heroine) for me in the form of Robyn Davidson. I've read it 5 times. Rick Smolans pictures can't be viewed enough times to satisfy me.

182. Posted by Block (Budding Member 20 posts) 10y

Opening Skinner's Box - by Lauren Slater (I think).

Very good book for anyone who has an interest in human psychology.

183. Posted by vange (Budding Member 43 posts) 10y

Authors: Erich Fromm's, Joseph Campbell's, Clarence Day's...
Titles: Pippi Longstocking, The Republic, Meditations, Gulliver's Travel...

184. Posted by zags (Respected Member 370 posts) 10y

Currently reading Haruki Murakami's "Kafka on the Shore". Unusual... Interesting...

185. Posted by Desiree (Inactive 157 posts) 10y

norwegian woods, such a beautiful book, and all the books of david mitchell, you really need to think about everything he writes, but in the end it does make sense.

and i also likes the count of monte christo, alexander dumas and a hongarian writer, sandor maraí, he is amazing in telling stories and conversations.

of course i read the alchemist as well, and that with veronica decides to die, i like the best, the rest of his books are just less..
and per olav enquist, the visit of the royal physician, again i didn't really like his other books, but this one pulls you in tbe story and you can't let it go untill you finished the whole book...

186. Posted by walkabout (Budding Member 39 posts) 10y

Hi there, (not sure if this has been mentioned before, sorry but there were 19 pages to read! ) but has anyone taken part in BookCrossing? and no, i don`t work for the website or anything

Had heard about bookcrossing (ie. leaving a book in a public place and `setting it free`, hoping that someone will pick it up and then set it free, etc) but it was only whilst travelling in Europe that i finally found a bookcrossing book!! It was chick-lit, but i really enjoyed having a read and then leaving the book somewhere for someone else. Plus it`s so much better than lugging around your novels from home (my packing regret!). But now whenever i look for a bookcrossing book, i can never find one, guess that`s always the way hey...

ps. Am reading Jonathan Franzen`s The Corrections at the moment. Know it is supposed to be brilliant, but just cannot get into it.

187. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 10y

I just traveled with a friend who loves "books on tape". I had never listened to a book before so it was a new experience... But, we listened to Bill Bryson's A Walk In The Woods which covers his "trek" along parts of the Appalachian Trail. In it, he mentions the number of hikers who "set their books free" for others to read. As much as I hate the idea of never seeing one of my books again, I still like the idea very much. If the book does not have sentimental value for you and you have finished reading it, then "passing it on to someone else" is an excellent idea. (We finished Bryson's book (on tape) and began listening to Stephen King's The Green Mile. Now I have to read it in print to find out what happens... Yes, saw the movie - but now want to read the book.)

While I was gone, Beerman read Jimmy Buffett's A Salty Piece of Land. I think he would recommend it, as he is now ipning for such a land mass and it made him appreciate the friendships that he has made on TP. (Not that he didn't already appreciate them - just solidified his feelings. Guess Harry Potter, Stephen King and The Seawolf are going to have to wait a bit longer while I read A Salty... first.)

188. Posted by cikusang (Respected Member 1361 posts) 10y

Thanks Isa for bringing back this thread...I am now reading "Kafka By the Shore" written by Harukami...splandid text and style of writing!

Has anyone ever read the books written by Egyptian author - Naguib Mahfouz? If so, what is your recommendation for me to start his book, which one? The Cairo Trilogy? Children of the Alley? The Thief and the Dogs? The Beggar?

189. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 10y

Quoting cikusang

I am now reading "Kafka By the Shore" written by Harukami...splandid text and style of writing!

Kafka on the Shore - Haruki Murakami

I'm still trying to finish The Art of Murder, by José Carlos Somoza. Hyperdramatism is amazing. Never knew such a thing existed.

190. Posted by Rraven (Travel Guru 5924 posts) 10y

I recently read 'A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian' by Marina Lewycka, its really funny in parts !! Its a quick entertaining read... perfect for sunny days

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