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241. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 10y

Quoting magykal1

Can I go back to the Haruki Murakami suggestion and say that I've just finished reading Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World which was really good - you can really see what messrs Banks and Mitchell have been nicking some of their ideas from! (sorry - inspired by...)

I really liked Hard-Boiled Wonderland too, it's awesome, and really quirky. Which other Murakamis have you read?

242. Posted by zanif (Full Member 113 posts) 10y

I read Little Children by Tom Perrotta during my flight from Las Vegas to Kuala Lumpur. I can't put it down because it's so funny.

[ Edit: Edited on Dec 18, 2006, at 8:51 PM by zanif ]

243. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 10y

Quoting Purdy

Ive read McCourts Angleas Ashes (movie was made) it was v good - l have also read another by him but the name escapes me!

Did you mean 'Tis, the sequel to Angela's Ashes? I agree it was very good.

[ Edit: Edited on Dec 18, 2006, at 10:57 PM by Ahila ]

244. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 10y

Quoting Kristie79

Here are my two recommendations:

Life if Pi by Yann Martel. A remarkable story of a young Indian boy who embarks on a journey with his Zoo Keeping family from India to Canada. He ends up stuck on a life boat with only a bengal tiger, a hyena, a wounded zebra and an orangutan for company. May sound a tad ridiculous but it really is a brillian read.

Yup. I agree. I loved Life of Pi and it certainly wasn't ridiculous. It was very much open to interpretation though. Highly recommend it.

Currently reading Timeri Murari's Taj. Interesting but not captivating.

[ Edit: Edited on Dec 18, 2006, at 11:03 PM by Ahila ]

245. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Reading Murakami for the first time and I am enjoying The Elephant Vanishes a lot. I think the translators, Jay Rubin and Alfred Birnbaum, have done a good job in their translation of Haruki Murakami's book from Japanese to English.

246. Posted by Juju76 (Budding Member 34 posts) 9y

It is amazing to see how many people on this forum seem to like Haruki Murakami. Is it just because he is a very popular author or is there a connexion between liking his work and having a taste for travel?
Is it because many travellers are nature lovers and this theme is very present in Murakami's work?
Is it because his stories are often about people on a quest for themselves and travelling may be a way to find yourself?
Or is it just because he is very readable and great to take with you when you are travelling?
Any other idea on the subject?

Anyway like many people here I really like this author. My preference amongst those of his novels that I have read goes to "South of the Border, West of the Sun", which I really like for its poetry and sweet-bitter atmosphere.

247. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Quoting Juju76

It is amazing to see how many people on this forum seem to like Haruki Murakami. Is it just because he is a very popular author or is there a connexion between liking his work and having a taste for travel?
Is it because many travellers are nature lovers and this theme is very present in Murakami's work?
Is it because his stories are often about people on a quest for themselves and travelling may be a way to find yourself?
Or is it just because he is very readable and great to take with you when you are travelling?
Any other idea on the subject?

Hi Julien,
I have been trying to think of the reason why I liked the first book of Murakami that I have ever read. It has been pretty ambiguous and initially, I could only relate it to the feeling I had after eating my first sushi. It was a quick, surprising and new experience that I was left wondering whether I had enjoyed it or not. Anyway, as I read more stories in 'The Elephant Vanishes', I am beginning to like his very readable style of writing, that very pleasantly and simply puts everyday living before you and at the same time leaves a lot to your imagination with regard to the darker side of life. I think the good translation also heightened the experience.

Look forward to reading more of Murakami's writing...
Cheers,
Ahila.

P.S: Have you read any of R.K. Narayan's short stories, especially 'Under the Banyan Tree and other stories'? Narayan has a totally different style of writing but he also has a unique style of seemingly effortless narration that brings to life people and places.

[ Edit: Edited on Feb 9, 2007, at 9:06 PM by Ahila ]

248. Posted by Juju76 (Budding Member 34 posts) 9y

Hello,

Have you read any of R.K. Narayan's short stories, especially 'Under the Banyan Tree and other stories'?

No I had never heard of this book but I note it down as the next book I have to read!

I think the good translation also heightened the experience.

Agree with you on the fact that translation makes a big difference. I first read "Norwegian Wood" (still Murakami) in English and really liked it. Later, I went again through some parts of the book in a French translation and was very disappointed: The parts of the book I had liked the most sound just bland and ordinary in the French version!

I saw yesterday that "Persepolis" by Marjane Satrapi is available in english translation. It is an autobiographical cartoon by an iranian woman who spent her childhood in Iran in the 80s and now lives in France. It is moving, funny and gives you a perspective on Iran which is different from the one you generally get from the media. For all these reasons I strongly recommand it.

249. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Quoting Juju76

I saw yesterday that "Persepolis" by Marjane Satrapi is available in english translation. It is an autobiographical cartoon by an iranian woman who spent her childhood in Iran in the 80s and now lives in France. It is moving, funny and gives you a perspective on Iran which is different from the one you generally get from the media. For all these reasons I strongly recommand it.

I was also recommended Satrapi's Embroideries. I guess Satrapi is on my books to read next.

250. Posted by Budai (Respected Member 506 posts) 9y

Motoring with Mohammed by Eric Hansen is actually quite good.... Also Life of Pi....

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