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261. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Currently starting on "Oscar and Lucinda" by Peter Carey. Anyone read it and liked it?

262. Posted by Not Lost (Full Member 132 posts) 9y

Quoting ali g.

My favourite book of all time is an oldie,but one I can read every few years, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.

This is my top of the list, absolutely! Loved how it was narrated from a little kid's point of view.

In Siberia by Colin Thubron was a good read especially before I made the trip there

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller was an equally good read as well

But of course, how can anyone leave out The Hobbit by Tolkien?

[ Edit: Edited on Jul 11, 2007, at 4:02 AM by Not Lost ]

263. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 9y

Just finished Until I Find You by John Irving. Not his best, but still extremely good. His writing is like poetry.

I just started "Princess Bride" by William Golding (seen the movie about 10 times), and it's FABULOUS! I'm only about 20 pages in and I can't wait for the day to finish so I can go back for more. Cary Elwes - yummy.

264. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 9y

A couple of recent reads I rather liked:

Black Swan Green by David Mitchell
Off-beat (fictional) account of growing up in rural England

The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai
Moving and well-written novel about Indians with different views and experiences existing in and trying to come to terms with global society and the tatters of empire.

265. Posted by mikeyBoab (Travel Guru 5077 posts) 9y

I finished "Brother Odd" by Dean Koontz - fantastic! Reading another of his novels now - Fear Nothing - also very good!

266. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 9y

Has anyone read any Ray Bradbury? I tried to read something by him when I was about 10, and hated it. Then I picked up "Zen in the Art of Writing" and that was pretty good, although it's non-fiction. So now I've ordered Dandelion Wine again, but I'm not sure what to expect...

267. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Read Susan Fletcher's Eve Green and Peter Carrey's Oscar and Lucinda. Liked them both.

268. Posted by mikeyBoab (Travel Guru 5077 posts) 9y

Quoting mikeyBoab

I finished "Brother Odd" by Dean Koontz - fantastic! Reading another of his novels now - Fear Nothing - also very good!

Very good as well. Just for a change, I've moved on to some japanese literature - "Hard boiled wonderland and the edge of the world" by Haruki Murakami. Very bizarre and not easy to get into.

269. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 9y

Quoting mikeyBoab

Very good as well. Just for a change, I've moved on to some japanese literature - "Hard boiled wonderland and the edge of the world" by Haruki Murakami. Very bizarre and not easy to get into.

I love that book! Murakami's stuff is an acquired taste, so it does take time to get used to it. But if you manage to like "Hard Boiled Wonderland", I'm sure you'll like the rest of his stuff too.

270. Posted by kombizz (Full Member 1416 posts) 9y

Hafez was born in the beautiful city of Shiraz in Persia (Iran ). As a young child he was called Shams –ud-din Mohammed. Hafez proved to have a prodigious talent for literature. At an early age he successfully memorized the Qu’ran, and this is why he took the pen name of “Hafez” – Hafez means one who has memorized the entire Qu’ran by heart. As well as studying the Qu’ran Hafez was also introduced to the other great Sufi poets such as Rumi, Farid –ud-din Attar and Saadi, these Sufi poets would later have some influence on the poetry of Hafiz.

A famous story about Hafez tells how he fell in love with a beautiful woman. He saw her in his local area whilst delivering bread. He became so enchanted with love for this woman that he could think of nothing else. Hafez started to write love poems dedicated to his sweetheart, and these became famous throughout Shiraz. Unable to live without his beloved, Hafiz resolved to undertake a 40 night vigil at the tomb of Baba Kuhi'. Babu Kuhi was a famous poet who promised to fulfil 3 desires of anyone who could stay awake for 40 nights at his tomb.

On the first night Hafez had a vision of the Angel Gabriel. He was so enchanted with her beauty, he resolved to seek only God who would by nature be infinitely more beautiful than any human form. Gabriel then revealed to him where he could find a spiritual master who would be able to lead him towards God. This master was Muhammed Attar, who lived a humble life in Shiraz.

From this point Hafiz became a prodigious poet producing hundreds of poems which expressed a seekers longing for union with the divine. His poetry made Hafez famous and he gained the respect and love of many local inhabitants. However his ecstatic and unorthodox poetry gained him the displeasure of the ruling Muslim orthodoxy. Because of this Hafez twice had to flea the city of Shiraz, on many occasions he was only saved by his sharp wit.

At the age of about 60, his Master Attar, finally granted Hafez his life long desire - union with God. From this point Hafiz’s poems reflected a new consciousness, no longer was there any sense of separateness from God.

Hafez wrote about 5,000 poems, although unfortunately these were never written down and therefore there is some scholarly dispute about the authenticity of some poems. In the West Hafez has only become famous in the last century. One of the most important early translations was by Gertrude Bell in 1897. Recently there have been new translations and versions by authors such as Daniel Ladinsky. These have helped Hafiz become a well renowned poet in the West. The poetry of Hafiz has a universal attraction. It is said Hafez once stated,

“No one could ever paint a too wonderful picture
of my heart or God.”


- Biography by Richard

[ Edit: Edited on Sep 20, 2007, at 6:35 AM by kombizz ]

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