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301. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3713 posts) 8y

Quoting outcast

Didn't see it listed here

Shantaram: David Gregory Roberts - Escapes prision in Australia and ends up living in a Slum in Bombay, joins mafia in bombay and travels to Afghanistan. One of the best books out there, have yet to meet someone who did not like it.

Travels in Afghanistan A Distant Light: Jason Elliot - guy goes back to Afghansitan just before Taliban come in after the Russians and travels overland visiting places he had been 20 years previously. Well written and a great insight into Afghanistan's history.

Running with the Moon - Jonny Bealby: His girlfriend dies while they are traveling and he sets off around Africa on a motorbike. A nice simple read, that people like due to the nature of the story.

Silk Dreams, Troubled Road - Jonny Bealby: Now Jonny sets off across Central Asia with a girl on horseback he only met a week before under the guise of making a TV series about their relationship. I didn't like it as much as the first, but then all the girls I gave it too loved it!

I have read 'Shantaram' and 'silk dreams troubled road' and really enjoyed both. 'A distant light' has been on my 'book list' to read for ages.

I have just finished 'Bad Lands' by Tony Wheeler which I found a very readable and interesting insight into the several 'evil' countries that Tony explores.

Am currently reading 'The Zanzibar Chest' by Aidan Hartley and am thoroughly enjoying it.

[ Edit: Edited on Jun 15, 2008, at 9:37 PM by bex76 ]

302. Posted by TLWH (Travel Guru 516 posts) 8y

Bad lands? Is that the lonely planet publication? I browsed through it when I was in Turkey but picked up Running iwht the moon instead.

Travels in Afgan, is a bit heavy in places if you like those regions then it's worth it. He's written one on Iran too, which I discovered as I just left Iran... would have loved to have read it before going there.

For a Pagan Song is also meant to be good, by Bealby, but I don't have a great selection where I am now. It's either how to start a business in 24 hours, or why I should join ten churchs.... hmm... hence I just downloaded an Audio book

303. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3713 posts) 8y

Quoting outcast

Bad lands? Is that the lonely planet publication? I browsed through it when I was in Turkey but picked up Running iwht the moon instead.

Travels in Afgan, is a bit heavy in places if you like those regions then it's worth it. He's written one on Iran too, which I discovered as I just left Iran... would have loved to have read it before going there.

For a Pagan Song is also meant to be good, by Bealby, but I don't have a great selection where I am now. It's either how to start a business in 24 hours, or why I should join ten churchs.... hmm... hence I just downloaded an Audio book

yes it's the Lonely Planet one. It's easy reading but full of interesting facts I thought. I had read mixed reviews about it but would recommend it.

I would love to read the Iran one by Elliott, as I really want to go there, will have to look into that one. Did you like Iran?

Whereabouts are you now?

304. Posted by TLWH (Travel Guru 516 posts) 8y

Am in Asia now trying to catch up on my blog entries and trying to turn out my own literary master piece

Iran was at first a huge disappointment, but later on in the trip became a huge highlight.

My problem with Iran was self inflicted, I had a fantastic time in Morocco for months, and was hoping for the same thing in Iran. Being Emerged in the mysteries of the middle east type mentality. What I got in East Iran was an Arabic speaking Europe. Neon lights, modern stores and lots of tourism, albeit Iranian. Nothing negative in its own right, just not what I was looking for if you know what I mean. I am not so pushed with exploring Islamic nations either as I had just returned from two years living in Nigeria so that held no massive appeal either. Maybe someone not use to all those elements would have enjoyed that side more.

However Shriaz, and especially Yazd were fantastic. More Middle East in a westerners conception of what it should be. The people were also a lot more friendly, at least in my opinion. It was less developed and the mud cities were just great. The lone border crossing into Pakistan was something I won't forget in a lifetime as well. The food too was much better in central and eastern Iran. It seemed more varied.

I don't mean in the slightest to be negative about Iran, in fact its a huge thumbs up for me on a place to go. It is for sure a must see place. And for me the central east side of it is completely unique in the world. At least the world I have been to anyway!

Sorry just had lunch and am babbling!!

305. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3713 posts) 8y

sounds fascinating, I wish that I had gone while I was in the UK as now I'm too far away! Shiraz sounds fabulous. Will definitely be making an effort to go when I am on that side of the world again though.

Talking of Iran, and books, I have also recently read 'Reading Lolita in Tehran' - A Memoir in Books by Azar Nafisi. It wasn't the best book I have ever read but was an interesting read and a good insight into the lives of women in Iran.

306. Posted by TLWH (Travel Guru 516 posts) 8y

Try Mayada, Daughter of Iraq by Jean Sasson. I wouldn't put it onto by no.1 list but it can be a harrowing read any perspective.

Getting on a local bus in Iran with a Korean girl and seeing her in the womans segregated half separated behind iron bars was a serious shocker to me from a visual perspective that is.

[ Edit: Edited on Jun 17, 2008, at 3:04 AM by outcast ]

307. Posted by soupatrvlr (Respected Member 385 posts) 8y

Quoting bex76

Am currently reading 'The Zanzibar Chest' by Aidan Hartley and am thoroughly enjoying it.

I loved this book, in fact was going to mention it along with the Alexandra Fuller book. Great read with several stories intertwined. If you are interested, Aidan Hartley was interviewed on NPR for Fresh Air about the book and its a really interesting interview. You can listen to it in the NPR archives. I believe there is a link to it from Hartley website as well.

308. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3713 posts) 8y

Quoting outcast

Try Mayada, Daughter of Iraq by Jean Sasson. I wouldn't put it onto by no.1 list but it can be a harrowing read any perspective.

Also by Jean Sasson, I would highly recommend the Princess trilogy - 3 books about the Saudi royal family, entitled Princess, Daughters of Arabia and Desert Royal. I really enjoyed all 3 books.

[ Edit: Edited on Jun 17, 2008, at 10:21 PM by bex76 ]

309. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3713 posts) 8y

Quoting soupatrvlr

Quoting bex76

Am currently reading 'The Zanzibar Chest' by Aidan Hartley and am thoroughly enjoying it.

I loved this book, in fact was going to mention it along with the Alexandra Fuller book. Great read with several stories intertwined. If you are interested, Aidan Hartley was interviewed on NPR for Fresh Air about the book and its a really interesting interview. You can listen to it in the NPR archives. I believe there is a link to it from Hartley website as well.

cool, would definitely be interested in hearing this interview. Thanks - will look it up later when I'm at home, better get back to some work now! :)

310. Posted by TLWH (Travel Guru 516 posts) 8y

Has any one read Ted Simon's Jupiter books or For A Pagan Song by Jonny Bealby? I am about to go to serious hassle in getting them shipped to me. Hmmm.

I just spent the last 30mins going through the whole list and saw a classic missing

1984 by George Orwell A very true book about today, from a quite some time ago. Great book.

I had the misfortune of seeing the movie a few days ago. Avoid at all costs. Snore fest.

[ Edit: Edited on Jul 9, 2008, at 10:01 AM by outcast ]