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The TP Book Club is now in session...

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341. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 7y

Just a quick update...

Eric has posted an entry in the blog explaining the rules. All members interested in becoming a reviewer, please see:

THE BOOK CLUB - About The Book Club

Thanks (in advance) for participating!!!!! ;)

342. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 7y

Quoting Isadora

Just a quick update...

Eric has posted an entry in the blog explaining the rules. All members interested in becoming a reviewer, please see:

THE BOOK CLUB - About The Book Club

Thanks (in advance) for participating!!!!! ;)

That's a neat idea, Isa! I don't see your name on it ;) Would a similar one be started for movies? The movies thread has quite a few 'reviewers' too.

343. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 7y

Quoting summer910

Quoting Isadora

Just a quick update...

Eric has posted an entry in the blog explaining the rules. All members interested in becoming a reviewer, please see:

THE BOOK CLUB - About The Book Club

Thanks (in advance) for participating!!!!! ;)

That's a neat idea, Isa! I don't see your name on it ;) Would a similar one be started for movies? The movies thread has quite a few 'reviewers' too.

A Movie Club would be a good idea for sure :) Let's give the Book Club a little time to develop and see if we can get enough reviews.. then follow it up with a Movie Club !

344. Posted by Lachesis (Budding Member 26 posts) 7y

I found Ayn Rand's first novel really moving shocking and educational. It's about the lives of three people in 1905 in Russia who struggle against Soviet oppression. It portrays the destructive effects of collectivism. As Ayn said, it's theme is:"The individual against the state." I was amazed!

345. Posted by zaksame (Respected Member 571 posts) 7y

I can't remember if I posted this before or not (that's old age for you) but I have to shout to the world about two books;

in no particular order, here they are:

1.) 'Any Human Heart' by William Boyd

2.) 'Timoleon Vieta Come Home' by Dan Rhodes

Timoleon Vieta Come Home resembles Italo Calvino’s Difficult Loves and Alberto Moravia’s The Voice Of The Sea, and that’s saying something. Rhodes clearly has a firm grasp of passionate misunderstandings and hopeless undertakings. It’s almost enough to make you cry.
Irish Times

346. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 7y

I want to shout to the English-speaking world about two German authors which (despite immense popularity in Germany) are almost unknown to English readers.

The first author is Karl May. He was a very prolific writer who lived at the end of the 19th century. Being very poor he did not have the resources to sit down and write a novel and then publish it. Instead he made a living by writing serial novels for weekly journals, thus getting weekly pay. Unfortunatly these serial novels then were the equivalent of a soap opera (think Denver Clan, The Fugitive), so his work has been looked down upon by some literati for a long time. Thouroughly undeserved if you ask me. His plots are no worse than those by Dickens and his writing is equal to those of Melville and other bigshots.

Karl May is probably the German author whose works have been translated into more languages than any other German author. He has been immensely popular around the world, but practically unknown in English. The reason for this is that until recently no English translation existed. There were translations into Czech, French, Dutch, Polish, Chinese, Indonesian, any language you can think of - but not English. I think the problem is that his writing is so immensely colorful and evocative, just like with H. Melville translators find him difficult to translate without loosing the magic of the story. But some dedictated fans took matters into their own hands and now for the first time there are English translations of his work available. I urge you all to grab a copy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_May

The second author is Wilhelm Hauff. He lived at the beginning of the 19th century in Southwest Germany, his work is strongly influenced by Romanticism. He is best known for some of his oriental fairy tales, Dwarf Big Nose, Little Muck and Caliph Stork. But the stories I like best are also the ones that are the most interesting to travellers: Aside from the oriental fairy tales he also wrote a bunch of fairy tales and stories that take place in Southern Germany, noteably at tourist destinations such as the Black Forest and the Swabian Alb. If you ever travel to the Black Forest bring a copy of The Stone Cold Heart, you'll enjoy your trip much more if you have read this story.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Hauff

You can read some of Hauff's works for free under the link below, the last two stories "The story of the Stag-Florin" and "The Heart of Stone" (aka The Stone Cold Heart) take place in Germany.

http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/mcdonnell/hauff/hauff.html

347. Posted by Daawgon (Travel Guru 1992 posts) 7y

Probably my favorite travel writer has to be Dervla Murphy (who ?) - I quote the piece from Wikipedia about this non-fiction writer here:

Dervla Murphy (born November 28, 1931, Ireland) is an Irish touring cyclist and author of adventure travel books for over 40 years.

Murphy is best known for her 1965 book Full Tilt: Ireland to India With a Bicycle, about an overland cycling trip through Europe, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. She followed this by volunteering with Tibetan refugees in India and Nepal, and trekking with a mule through Ethiopia. Murphy took a break from travel writing following the birth of her daughter, and then wrote about her travels with Rachel in India, Pakistan, South America, Madagascar and Cameroon. She later wrote about her solo trips through Romania, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Rwanda, South Africa, Laos, the states of the former Yugoslavia, and Siberia. In 2005 she visited Cuba with her daughter and three granddaughters.

Murphy has normally traveled alone and unaided, without luxuries and depending on the hospitality of local people. She has been in dangerous situations; for example, she was attacked by wolves in the former Yugoslavia, threatened by soldiers in Ethiopia, and robbed in Siberia. However, she described her worst incident as tripping over cats at home and shattering her left arm.

A complete list if publications is as follows:

* Full Tilt: Ireland to India With a Bicycle, 1965.
* Tibetan Foothold, 1966.
* The Waiting Land: A Spell in Nepal, 1967.
* In Ethiopia with a Mule, 1968.
* On a Shoestring to Coorg: An Experience of South India, 1976.
* Where the Indus is Young: A Winter in Baltistan, 1977.
* A Place Apart, 1978.
* Wheels Within Wheels (autobiography), 1979.
* Race to the Finish? The Nuclear Stakes, 1982.
* Muddling through in Madagascar, 1985.
* Changing the Problem: Post-forum Reflections, 1985.
* Ireland, Orbis, 1985.
* Eight Feet in the Andes: Travels With a Mule in Unknown Peru, 1986.
* Tales From Two Cities: Travels of Another Sort, 1987.
* Cameroon With Egbert, 1990.
* Transylvania and Beyond, 1993.
* The Ukimwi Road: From Kenya to Zimbabwe, 1995.
* Visiting Rwanda, 1998.
* South From the Limpopo: Travels Through South Africa, 1999.
* One Foot in Laos, 2001
* Through the Embers of Chaos: Balkan Journeys, 2003.
* Through Siberia by Accident, 2005.
* Silverland: A Winter Journey Beyond the Urals, 2006
* The Island That Dared, 2008 (Travels in Cuba)

[ Edit: Edited on 25-Sep-2009, at 10:12 by Daawgon ]

348. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3711 posts) 7y

Can anyone recommend any books about Korea - either travel writing or fiction? I've just come back from South Korea and am keen to read some more about both North and South.

349. Posted by SuperBrat (Full Member 107 posts) 6y

Not sure about Korea, but am keen to know what people thought (if you had read it), this book called Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert which is being made into a movie starring Julie Roberts...

350. Posted by lil_lil (Travel Guru 462 posts) 6y

I'm one super duper lucky girl! I've been asked to review a book at the moment (Kitchen Chinese by Ann Mah) and it's a good read for anyone trying to grasp some of Chinese mindset as well as connecting any readers that have dealt with issues of self-identity despite ethnicity. I really enjoy it, and will get writing on the review soon.

Kitchen Chinese will be available from 9th February 2010.