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Exotic Foods from Your C ountry

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21. Posted by snatterand (Travel Guru 454 posts) 11y

Could anyone please tell me the difference between Marmite and Vegemite (not sure of the spelling but you know what I mean...)?

//Susanna

22. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 11y

Hopefully, this will help define them for you, Susanna!

Vegemite, Marmite and Promite are all yeast extracts and basically all the same, but: Marmite is sweeter than vegemite Promite is sweeter then marmite They're all extremely salty tasting.

Or, Vegemite is very salty, marmite slightly less so. Promite is considerably less salty.

They all use caramel for the dark colouring, and it's probably this part which contributes to the war. Marmite is considerably sweeter (and darker) than Vegemite, while Promite is sweeter still.

Vegemite eaters will generally tolerate Marmite and Marmite eaters will tolerate Promite. Vegemite eaters find Promite sickly sweet.

Marmite eaters will not (usually) eat vegemite. It's too strongly flavoured for them as a general rule.

Promite is Australian (Masterfoods), but is gaining in popularity here. There are very few exclusive Promite eaters, so conclusions can't be drawn, but I'd expect that Promite eaters would react to Marmite the same way that Marmite eaters react to Vegemite. I have yet to see an advert for Promite in any medium.

Marmite is made by Sanitarium Health Food company, which is wholly owned by the Seventh Day Adventist church. Our 7DA's don't run around with guns, unlike a certain Texas sect. There was (still is?) a TV ad campaign for Marmite last year which had many viewers reaching for the off switch ("The Marmities").

Vegemite is made by multi-national food company Kraft General Foods NZ Ltd, who have acquired several "NZ" labels over the last 25 years. It isn't advertised much, though Kraft have been pushing it and their jam + cheese labels recently in a series of adverts starring Billy Connolly and Pamela Stevenson (Why Billy - a Scot - is pushing vegemite is beyond me, as most non-antipodeans can't stand any of the yeast extracts...)

There is a product called "Marmite" made by the Marmite company in Britain. This is not the same as the Marmite found in New Zealand - the UK version has all sorts of things added such as vegetable bits and according to those who've tried it tastes considerably different.

Lyndon Watson wrote: "I don't know about the vegetable bits, but I found British Marmite to have (a) a lighter brown colour, (b) a runnier texture and (c) a stronger but otherwise similar flavour."

None of these spreads should be spread thickly. That's the second mistake most foreigners make. The first is trying the stuff at the insistence of NZ hosts, most of whom are gleefully anticipating the response. Best results are obtained by spreading _very_ thinly. Discolouration of the underlying bread/toast is all that's necessary.

Do not get any of these spreads on your fingers if there are domestic animals around, especially cats. They all love the stuff and will try to lick you clean. Enthusiastic felines will sometimes try to remove your digits too...

This info came from Marmite-Vegemite. There's more information on that site too.

23. Posted by snatterand (Travel Guru 454 posts) 11y

Wow, that's a comprehensive answer for sure! ;)

I had Vegemite occasionally in NZ, didn't love it but I didn't really dislike it either. We have some pretty salty stuff here in Sweden too so I wasn't as shocked as many other foreigners.

//Susanna

24. Posted by Floorder (Budding Member 19 posts) 11y

dutch food:

spacecake ;)
Raw herring with chopped onions (yek)
Salt and sweet liquorice
all kinds of fried chemical waste you can buy at snackbars, like a snack called 'frikandel'(a long deep fried roll of poor quality meat, often eaten with ketchup, mayonaise and chopped onion) (double yek) mostly, when used as a meal accompanied by thick belgian fries.
Also ultimately dutch: eating your fries with indonesian sateh-sauce (peanutsauce), the real die hards combine the sateh-sauce with mayonaise and -again- chopped onions.

25. Posted by toothache (Full Member 82 posts) 11y

.... i'm craving at midnight!

mine has to be Rice,with Ayam(chicken) cili padi Gravy, with Bagedil(sort of mash potato balls, deep fried with spices!)
And Sambal Belacan!

A Typical Malay/Javanese Dish!

26. Posted by ChIqUiTtA (Respected Member 278 posts) 11y

haha poutine and tim horton's for sure!!!

Canada is known also for it's Maple syrup (which is amazing on anything!)
There are also alot of aboriginal foods that are very traditional but still common on native reserves in canada... there's Bannock, a thick, chewy, raisin bread. There's dried seaweed, which i've seen some people eat like potato chips, there's also all sorts of stews and fish meals that are very "Canadian"... salmon's a common fish in Western Canada (BC), while lobster and other seafood is common in the Eastern maritime provinces...

i wouldn't necessarily say any of these are exotic, but i guess it all depends on your perspective!!;)

laur

27. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 11y

For the US...

Corn dogs - hot dogs stuck on a stick, dipped in a batter and deep-fried
Funnel cakes - a pastry batter squeezed through a pastry bag, deep-fried and sprinkled with powdered sugar

See a pattern forming here???

[ Edit: Fixed typo ]

28. Posted by FionaNZ (Respected Member 903 posts) 11y

Quoting Isadora

though Kraft have been pushing it and their jam + cheese labels recently in a series of adverts starring Billy Connolly and Pamela Stevenson (Why Billy - a Scot - is pushing vegemite is beyond me, as most non-antipodeans can't stand any of the yeast extracts...)

Billy is married to Pamela who is of course a KIWI...

I'm a Vegemite fan the rest of my family are Marmite fan's

29. Posted by IronChef (Full Member 1076 posts) 11y

Quoting Isadora

For the US...

Corn dogs - hot dogs stuck on a stick, dipped in a batter and deep-fried
Funnel cakes - a pastry batter squeezed through a pastry bag, deep-fried and sprinkled with powdered sugar

See a pattern forming here???

HHhhhmmmm...fried food........

Tempura battered softshell crabs
Deep-fried Twinkies(:eek)
Churros(deep-fried cough dusted in cinnamon and sugar)
Doughnuts(Boston Creme please, oops, make that two, please)

excuse me - have to go plug in the Fry Daddy!

30. Posted by ali g. (Budding Member 241 posts) 11y

Vegemite rules over all the others but only in small doses. Wouldn't exactly call this exotic considering that I personally have never eaten one, but very popular here in Adelaide on your way home from a night on the town is a Pie Floater! take one bowl of really thick green pea soup, sit a meat pie in the middle and dowse heavily with tomato sauce. To me, it sounds truly revolting!