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Dark tourism

Travel Forums General Talk Dark tourism

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11. Posted by mim (Travel Guru 1276 posts) 11y

Can't you pay to blow up a cow or something there?

That is sick, but I don't think it counts as dark tourism...

I really think it's important for people to understand and experience a little of the sad things that go on in the world, Its important to move on but at the same time respect peoples memories and understand things...

12. Posted by rbyslipahs (Respected Member 349 posts) 11y

I can certainly understand visiting Auschwitz/Dachau or the Killing Fields in Cambodia, but ...Chernobyl???

Who wakes up and wants to visit a nuclear meltdown? Maybe it's just me, but coming away with thyroid cancer doesn't seem like my idea of a great trip.

I took my brother on a couple of haunted London tours (Jack the Ripper, etc). Macabre, yes, but it's something that he's fascinated by.

13. Posted by mim (Travel Guru 1276 posts) 11y

Quoting rbyslipahs

Who wakes up and wants to visit a nuclear meltdown? Maybe it's just me, but coming away with thyroid cancer doesn't seem like my idea of a great trip.

Radiation levels have been declared safe for visitors and not much above norm. So thats not a risk. there's even this little old lady that lives just on the outskirts and grows her own vegetables mim wanders off to imagine what a carrot would look like if it had teeth and three eyes...

m

14. Posted by Toad (Budding Member 2 posts) 11y

There are, in my opinion two types of Dark Tourism - well three actually. The first is people wanting to go somewhere where the effects of a recent tragedy are still visible - for example going to a war-zone, or the site of a natural disaster just to have a look. That's very voyeuristic and in my opinion kind of sick.
Then there's visits to places which have a dark history, or even in their past but which is just that - past. This is what we're talking about here, Auschwitz, The Killing Fields, the Genocide Museum in Kigali, or, indeed, Chernobyl. Though it can be termed dark tourism, it is historical, informative, and ultimitely I think it is good to remember and learn what has happened. I myself have been to many such places - Auschwitz, Tuol Seng, Killing Fields, Lennin Mausoleum, Mao Mausoleum, Sarajevo (5 years after the end of the war), as well as various museums dealing with torture, genocide, the hollocaust... As for Chernobyl, I would be interested in such a tour. The thrid type of Dark Tourism is and isn't Dark Tourism - it relates with events so far in the past that they're not considered dark tourism anymore but just historical tourism - visiting Battle fields from long gone wars, Visiting dungeons, visiting sacrificial alters in ancient ruins...

15. Posted by coldwarspy (Travel Guru 1108 posts) 11y

I love it!
been on the Jack Tour and too Aushwitz. Also been to the Bone Chapels in Czek and Portugal, Dracula's real castle - not in Brasov..etc... im always lookin for macabre places to go. Thats why i live in Edinburgh!

although, Lothian Road can become just as dodgy as any Jack the Ripper tour on a saturday nite!

16. Posted by moscowmetr (Full Member 267 posts) 11y

Quoting jeffG

I love it!
been on the Jack Tour and too Aushwitz. Also been to the Bone Chapels in Czek and Portugal, Dracula's real castle - not in Brasov..etc... im always lookin for macabre places to go. Thats why i live in Edinburgh!

although, Lothian Road can become just as dodgy as any Jack the Ripper tour on a saturday nite!

F a i r . . . .

17. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 11y

I love visiting cemeteries and war memorials - they're always the highlight of my trip. It gives you a better perspective of how we as human beings evolved, and all the pain and hurt and sacrifice it took to bring us to where we are today. My personal favorites so far have been:

  • Pere Lachaise Cemetery
  • The Paris Catacombs
  • Highgate Cemetery, London
  • St. Louis Cemetery, New Orleans
  • Juno Beach, Normandy
  • An old cemetery in Northern Ireland dating from about 1000 AD

[quote toad/] The first is people wanting to go somewhere where the effects of a recent tragedy are still visible - for example going to a war-zone, or the site of a natural disaster just to have a look. [/end quote]

I think this is important, although I've never done it myself. People who toured Rwanda and saw the effects of the genocide, for example, weren't given a pretty history project to look at. They saw the actual results of a recent event - saw firsthand just what genocide meant. It can change a life - and make one finally understand that war isn't just stragedy and losses and heroics, but real people living through horrendous times. I don't think it's voyeurism so much as bearing witness to what man can doto fellow man, in the hopes it won't happen again.

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