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31. Posted by Reece Sanford (Travel Guru 1368 posts) 10y

Quoting Sander

Doesn't dpreview have all the information you might ever want?

Thanks for pointing that out Sander but it just confuses me even more.Im hopeless at making choices like this

32. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 10y

Quoting -reece-

Quoting Sander

Doesn't dpreview have all the information you might ever want?

Thanks for pointing that out Sander but it just confuses me even more.Im hopeless at making choices like this

I would agree with reece on this one. I'm familiar with the dpreview comparison feature of course. But if you don't know what the criteria mean, it's basically useless.

But then again, if you don't know what the criteria mean, why are you so concerned about which camera to pick? Go with the salesman's recommendation.

Did that not answer anyone's dilemma ?

33. Posted by Reece Sanford (Travel Guru 1368 posts) 10y

Quoting Q_Zhang

Go with the salesman's recommendation.

Because theres too many salesmen out there who will sell you anything just to make money.

The problem for me is every camera i look at has one thing that puts me off about it.I havent found one yet that makes me want to put my hand in my pocket and pay for it.
And alot of these reviews one person will say the camera was fantastic for one thing yet someone else will say it was rubbish at that.
Maybe im being to fussy i guess,i mean at the end of the day these small cameras are not designed for giving you the best photo ever,they are more designed for slipping in your pocket and basically point and shooting at your subject.
Although having said that you still get some good photos with them.

34. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 10y

Quoting -reece-

Because theres too many salesmen out there who will sell you anything just to make money.

So ? Either you learn to choose yourself, or you pay for the "previlage" of letting someone choose for you.

Quoting -reece-

The problem for me is every camera i look at has one thing that puts me off about it.I havent found one yet that makes me want to put my hand in my pocket and pay for it.

This is why I had 4 cameras. Until I dropped and broke one. 4 - 1 = 3 cameras !!! Ahahaha.....as the Count would say.

35. Posted by Reece Sanford (Travel Guru 1368 posts) 10y

3 cameras!!!!
Do you want to give 1 to a friendly home hahahaha?

36. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 10y

Well, one of the 3 is being used by my parents since they're travelling more than me at the moment. I actually need to replace the point & shoot digital camera which I broke. I don't want to be
carrying a DSLR on weekend canoeing trips! Despite the advice of others on this thread, you can somewhat judge when you need what gear. ;)

I think if you do a quick flip through some flyers and websites for prices and then ask the salesperson for their advice you won't be too far off the mark. They're less likely to "cheat" a person who's done some homework. As with any purchase, it's about time and money, you're paying for the salesperson's knowledge. Take care.

37. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 10y

Are people finding the guide useful ? I was thinking of a basic portraiture guide, but I'm not sure if people are even reading this thing.

Post 38 was removed by a moderator
39. Posted by Ladymacwil (Full Member 170 posts) 10y

Having worked on both sides of the camera, as a professional model and sales manager for a stock photography agency representing hundreds of professional photographers, I'm happy to add a few thoughts.

Firstly, just about every photographer I know will take the "good" camera along with disposable cameras or Polaroid cameras. It's nice to just point and shoot when you catch something in the blink of an eye, hence the disposable. The "good" camera is for the portraits, architecteral,landscapes, and such where you have more control. The Polaroid is for instant photos to hand out. Some of the best photos of children's smiling faces are the shots you take AFTER showing the children their own photo and giving them their picture. (Beats handing out candy).

I agree with the poster who mentioned the importance of composition.
Most people think of landscapes and such but positioning people shots is a bit trickier. When posing groups of people for portraiture think triangles. For example, if you're shooting 12 people the ideal positioning would be 4 triangles of faces which makes a much more interesting shot than just lining everyone up in a straight row. Also, people look healthier and have a glow when shooting in the ideal "soft golden light". That typically means shooting people shots in morning hours of sunlight or in the golden rays of late afternoon. Avoid the harsh, direct, white light of a noonday sun unless shooting water, the water will be it's bluest at that time.

Also for practice, give yourself assignments, (this is also a good way to "get over it" during lousy weather when you had the "perfect picture" in mind.) Most people have seen the Dublin Doors poster, for example, which is a variety of beautiful single shots of doors.
As travellers, think of how interesting mail/post boxes are or Police Stations, churches, etc. Shoot tons of photos for your "self assignment" then edit down to the ideal images and study why they worked better. Being on stock photo shoots it wasn't unusual to shoot ten rolls of film or more for maybe 6 great photos. So play, have fun, study your results and edit tightly is my rule of thumb.

Post 40 was removed by a moderator