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Islam and terror

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1. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 11y

These two don't seem to match. But still most terrorist attacks these days have a islamic background. Like Christianity, hinduism and other religions basics of Islam are one of peace and even respect to other religions. How is it possible that Islam extremists constantly attack the rest of the world with their bombs and kill innocent people? What is their purpose? This is not a way of promoting their religion, in fact what they do is generating hatred against islam. You rarely hear of Christian or Hindu terrorist attacks, Islamic terrorism is a mystery to me:(.

2. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin 5588 posts) 11y

Quoting wouterrr

These two don't seem to match. But still most terrorist attacks these days have a islamic background. Like Christianity, hinduism and other religions basics of Islam are one of peace and even respect to other religions. How is it possible that Islam extremists constantly attack the rest of the world with their bombs and kill innocent people? What is their purpose? This is not a way of promoting their religion, in fact what they do is generating hatred against islam. You rarely hear of Christian or Hindu terrorist attacks, Islamic terrorism is a mystery to me:(.

Oooph, interesting post; I sense it becoming a heated debate Before that happens; please to all repliers, an open well-mannered discussion only. No 'I hate George Bush' type posts :)

Although I am not an expert in this wouterrr, from what I know the Islamic community in general condemns these these acts just as much as (if not 'more than') the rest of the world. It is small, very radical, fractions inside the Islam that take it to this level.

I have heard a lot about Christian terrorist attacks. The IRA is a good example where it is 'christianity' causing a very similar outcome. Go back further and the Crusades were a prime example of killing 'in the name of christianity'.

Just this past week in India there was a wave of terrorist bomb explosions, aparently with 'Hindu' militant organizations behind them.

It's definitely not just an Islam thing, but several of the recent attacks, especially those on the 'western world', have triggered this kind of thinking more strongly.

I condemn all terrorist attacks without seeing it as any form of 'religion'. There is no religion in the world that preaches this kind of act!

3. Posted by beerman (Respected Member 1631 posts) 11y

Quoting Sam I Am

No 'I hate George Bush' type posts :)

Gee Sam, take my fun away why don't you..

This is one of the Great Mysteries of Life. How is it that a person can so distort the tenets of their religion that they find murder to be an acceptable practice? Yes, there is great evil in this world, but to counter evil with more evil? It doesn't make moral sense.

I have found, in my own personal experiences, that many people I have met that profess a faith in religion, God, etc., are not necessarily following what their religions practice. They seem to take what they want out of their Holy Books and disregard the rest. In America, I like to call it "Convenience Store Religion". Practicing peace, tolerance, faith, and understanding seems to be beyond the comprehension of some of these people. And I believe that all religions preach these subjects in one form or another.

Why is it so important for extremists to force their religious beliefs on others? It happens all over the world. Why is not possible to simply have faith in whatever you like, without someone ramming their ideologies down your throat? This is the Twenty-First Century. These Holy Books were written thousands of years ago. They were meant for an audience long dead. Religion needs to update itself. It must be practised with a view to modern times. Is it practical to follow teachings that allow women to be abused, for example?

I find that those people who preach the loudest tend to be the worst of their religions, a distortion of theology. Religion has caused more hatred and murder than anything else I know.

As for me, if you're curious, I despise organized religion. Yet I hold more Faith than any 50 people I know.

I could go on and on. I have not intended to offend anyone with my diatribe. This is my personal opinion. If you are not in agreement with me, that's fine, I don't expect anyone to agree with me. But, if you are deeply offended, then practice tolerance for the uniformed, don't pick up a rock.

4. Posted by rbyslipahs (Respected Member 349 posts) 11y

Agree with all of the above! Except in the fact that I do believe in my own faith, but I will agree that it does need a kick in the pants to get with the times. ;)

I think what bugs me the most about terrorist threats from any religion is the concept of perpetuating violence because of a cultural rage. I think it's fueled in part by a lack of access to education in many cases, no matter what side of the issue someone is on. If I were to blatantly attack someone without provocation, I could understand why they might retaliate.

5. Posted by Brendan (Respected Member 1824 posts) 11y

Through out the ages people have been using ideologies and dogma as the means to justify the ends. In other words, Islam today is as Chrisianity was to the 1100's. The method and means by which people attack and impose their will on others. The times have changed along with the dogma, but people have not.

Take away Islam and these same people will use something else. Religion can not be blamed, politics can not be blamed. It comes down to people. And people will find a way to do what they believe to be right. One way, or another.

6. Posted by Peter (Admin 5807 posts) 11y

I'm in agreement with all above. So much for a heated debate

In my understanding, most modern terrorist activities revolve around an occupation of land (in this case, western troops in Saudi Arabia). Religion is simply used as a way of motivating people into believing they are fighting for a higher cause.

But it's not just islam. As pointed out, a lot of the fighting in Ireland over several decades saw Christians fighting in the name of their faith. Then there have been the abortion clinic bombers, the cult followers (Tokyo metro attack for instance), and one of the worst atrocities to have happened in the last decade - the systematic slaughtering of 1 million people in Rwanda, in the name of Christianity. I consider myself a Christian and I don't consider any of those acts even remotely affiliated to the faith I hold. Likewise, I don't hold islam responsible for the many recent terror attacks done in their name.

7. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 11y

Quoting Brendan

And people will find a way to do what they believe to be right. One way, or another.

I think you've hit the nail on the head, B. The concept of "right" and "wrong" has been so wrapped up in religion and belief that people can use it to justify all kinds of things. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but the more peaceful religions (such as shinto or budism) don't have a concept of "right" and "wrong".

8. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 11y

Islam as religion should not be connected to terrorism. But still Islamic terrorist groups seem to have a lot of followers in Islamic countries. I don't understand why the real (spiritual) leaders of religious and real islam don't condemn these attacks. If mullahs(sunni-islam) and Emams (shii-islam) just would come together and condemn violence and terrorism, but apparently they refuse to do so (because there is still a fight between them going on). Why do extremists and fundamentalist groups still have a lot of power in Islamic countries? Maybe most people in these countries don't understand the kuran or maybe they are just afraid to condemn extremists/terrorists.

The mayority of terrorist attacks from the last years have been of Islamic source. Think about 9/11, Madrid, London, Bali, Delhi (Islamic group for total independence of Kasjmir). What to think about this fine president Ahmadinejad of Iran who wanted to "blow" Isreal from the map (he quoted Khomeini another ultra-conservative asshole). Iran is a Islamic state, how could you preach violence if you are the leader of a islamic country. And why did the people choose this guy??????

9. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin 5588 posts) 11y

Quoting wouterrr

What to think about this fine president Ahmadinejad of Iran who wanted to "blow" Isreal from the map (he quoted Khomeini another ultra-conservative asshole). Iran is a Islamic state, how could you preach violence if you are the leader of a islamic country. And why did the people choose this guy??????

What about the President of the States that vowed to root out the 'Access of Evil'??? Or the ultra conservative preacher that figures that America should wack Chavez and invade Iran? The US is a Christian country (considered as such), how could you preach violence if you are the leader of a Christian country (not to mention devoted ultra-conservative Christian yourself...). And why did the people choose this guy???? and the US is even a democracy which can't be said in the same way for Iran!

I'm not saying either one is right or wrong, but your argument holds up just the same the other way around

10. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 11y

Quoting Sam I Am

and the US is even a democracy which can't be said in the same way for Iran!

I haven't been following the Iranian elections closely, but based on the comments of some Iranians living in Canada and the little bit of press I've seen, the latest Iranian elections were quite fair and enthusiastically supported by the people. I'm not sure we can call Iran a "non-democracy" anymore.

BTW, it was interesting for me to learn that many Iranians (inside as well as outside Iran) are big time political bloggers!

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