Skip Navigation

Español in B.A.

Travel Forums Central/South America & The Caribbean Español in B.A.

Page ...

Last Post

61. Posted by numero1 (Respected Member 295 posts) 10y

Feliz ano nuevo

I just wish my English keyboard had one of those keys which lets me put an ~ above a letter to give it an accent just like the keyboards I used in latin America

62. Posted by Macachae (Full Member 240 posts) 10y

¡¡¡¡Feliz Año nuevo para ti...!!!!

Para poder escribir los carácteres de español puedes chequear en el codigo ASCII o mediante world escribir el mensaje y copiarlo...

He entendido perfectamente lo que escribes.
Pero en este topico entramos ( como en sudamerica) en vacaciones asi que hablaremos pero de cosas mas entretenidas.... por ejemplo : ¿cómo festejaste el año nuevo???

63. Posted by Macachae (Full Member 240 posts) 10y

mmmm ¡vacaciones! ¡qué lindo! una buena pregunta y utilizaremos el verbo gustar
¿Qué te gusta hacer en vacaciones?

(A mí) me gusta salir con amigos.
me gusta la playa (singular),
también me gustan los helados. (plural)

A ti ¿Qué te gusta?

64. Posted by Macachae (Full Member 240 posts) 10y

Quoting Macachae

mmmm ¡vacaciones! ¡qué lindo! una buena pregunta y utilizaremos el verbo gustar
¿Qué te gusta hacer en vacaciones?

(A mí) me gusta salir con amigos.
me gusta la playa (singular),
también me gustan los helados. (plural)

A ti ¿Qué te gusta?

¿qué?¿¿ No les gusta este ejercicio??!!!;)

65. Posted by numero1 (Respected Member 295 posts) 10y

Me gusta la playa,
tambien me gusta pollo grille y coca-cola.

66. Posted by Macachae (Full Member 240 posts) 10y

Quoting numero1

Me gusta la playa,
tambien me gusta pollo grille y coca-cola.

Mi gusta latinoamerica.
Me gusta Latinoamerica.
¿Te gusta latinoamerica.
A número1 Le gusta latinoamerica.
A nosotros Nos gusta latinoamerica.
A vosotros os gusta latinoamerica ¿verdad?
¡ Si A ellos no les gusta Latinoamerica! entonces:
¿Qué les gustará?

67. Posted by numero1 (Respected Member 295 posts) 10y

No sé. Tengo mucho confusión

68. Posted by Macachae (Full Member 240 posts) 10y

Quoting numero1

Tengo mucha confusión

o Estoy confundido!!!
Si numero 1 como estamos en fin de semana nuestro cerebro descanza y nos confundimos mucho!!! ;)

69. Posted by dbloom (Travel Guru 586 posts) 10y

from the webpage of a friend:

Al Passy has published the first Sephardic Folk Dictionary. It contains translations from English to Ladino and Ladino to English. In addition it includes words and phrases from Hebrew, Turkish, Italian, French and Greek that have entered the Ladino language.
Here are some samples from it:

ABÁSHO (L) below, abashár abásho = to go down . Los de abásho = the departed, the dead. Tódo sta de arríva abásho= everything is upside down.
ABASTÁDO (P) almighty omni- potent referring to God
MA (I) but, why
MAALÈ (T) street, Turkish quarters, neighborhood. Maalé yahudí =Jewish quarters
MAARÁV (H) west
MAASE (H) story, event Kontar un maasè=tell a story
MABÙL (H) deluge, downpour, torrent. No kyerro tanto, me dátes mabul= I don't want so much, you gave me plenty

"No kyerro tanto"

"You're speaking just like Cervantes," he said. I was in a cantina in Madrid in 1957. I met a man there, he was a reporter. We were conversing over a few drinks. I understood his puzzlement and had to explain. I was speaking the Spanish dialect I had learned at home. The dialect, or maybe it is a separate language, is commonly called, Ladino. More properly it should be referred to as, Djudeo Espanyol.
The Jews were expelled from Spain in 1492. My ancestors found refuge in the Ottoman Empire, and settled on the Island of Rhodes. Ottoman Jewish communities flourished in Rhodes , Salonika, Izmir, Istanbul, Sarajevo and elsewhere for 500 years and there they preserved the language that they had taken with them from Spain; Fifteenth Century Spanish, the dialect of Columbus, Ferdinand, Isabella and Cervantes. To that reporter in Madrid it was as if a modern American were to meet someone who spoke the English of Shakespearean times.
I grew up in a close knit Sephardic community in Los Angeles and assumed that Spanish was the language of the Jews. Not until I was in Junior High School did I learn that some Jews did not speak Spanish, they spoke a strange tongue called, Yiddish.
An even greater revelation was that our Spanish was different from that spoken in Spain and Latin America today. "Today we are going to learn some words in Spanish," said my fifth grade teacher. She continued, "The first thing that you must learn is that in Spanish the letter ‘j' is pronounced like an ‘h'". I thought she was crazy or at least uninformed, at home we pronounced the "j" as an English or French; "zh" or "dzh". Sometimes it was "sh" as in the word dejar which we pronounced deshar, in modern Spanish it is pronounced; dehar. And some of the words were different; we would say, aninda (yet), trocar (change), chapeo (hat) and chapines (shoes), for the modern Spanish words, todavia, cambiar, sombrero and zapatos. Years later I found that the first three words were Portuguese and the fourth was Catalan.
Another major difference between Ladino and modern Spanish is in the word for God. The Spanish say Dios, derived from the Latin, Deus. But to the Spanish Jews this was unacceptable because Dios ends in the letter "s" and that implies that Dios is plural. The foundation of the Jewish faith is that God is singular. This concept is reinforced every time we recite the Shemah: "...the lord is One." We always referred to God as: El Dio, always including the article El.
Another difference is our word for Sunday. In modern Spanish it is Domingo. But this comes from the Latin word for the "Lords Day." To the Jews Saturday is the Lords Day and we referred to Sunday as Alhát. I found later that this was the Arabic word for "The First Day," it is related to the Hebrew word Ehad (one).
When I heard about the Crypto Jews of New Mexico, I wondered if they had preserved any elements of the Ladino dialect. In my communications with Crypto Jews I found many who's grandparents said El Dio rather than Dios but none who called Sunday Alhat.
Other possible Ladino elements were the including of an extra "n" in many words and of reversing the "r" with another letter. We say muncho (much) rather than mucho and godro (fat) and prove (poor) rather than gordo and povre. I found that it is very common for rural New Mexicans to add the extra "n," but, few examples of the "r" shift.
Does this indicate that the Crypto Jews of New Mexico are indeed descended from the conversos of Spain. The linguistic evidence is not absolute, but together with so much other evidence, it strengthens the argument. The strongest evidence is in the preservation of El Dio. No Christian would use such words.

70. Posted by Macachae (Full Member 240 posts) 10y

Gracias por el comentario...
Personalmente tuve la experiencia de conocer y escuchar "ladino" en Israel en donde se conserva la literatura y la musica a la par del "Idish", este ultimo idioma es muy popular entre los ancianos acá en Buenos Aires.
Al llegar a Ramat Hashofet, un kibutz en Israel, algunos mencionaban al "españolit" que es otro modo de llamar al "ladino" idioma que es hablado todavia en regiones Mediterraneas... sorprendente verdad!!!???
Para aquellos que no lo escucharon se puede decir que "ladino" es el antiguo castellano escrito en caracter (letras) Hebreo.
La necesidad de los "marranos" de comerciar con los españoles y poder sobrevivir aun no conociendo el español y no tener acceso a la educacion negada por su condicion de judios los llevo a defenderse con el Idioma...
Siempre remarco a mis alumnos que:
"To Learn a language is To learn a Culture" ... the history around it open our mind to understand other... the basic reason why we pack up and travel... and in the way we can learn what remain and maybe we´ll preserve it!!

Page ...

Last Post