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51. Posted by james (Travel Guru 4136 posts) 11y

The punishment does NOT fit the crime, so he should not hang.

52. Posted by Brendan (Respected Member 1824 posts) 11y

If law is a system of enforceable rules governing social relations and legislated by a political system, it might seem obvious that law is connected to ideology. Ideology refers, in a general sense, to a system of political ideas, and law and politics seem inextricably intertwined. Just as ideologies are dotted across the political spectrum, so too are legal systems. Thus we speak of both legal systems and ideologies as liberal, fascist, communist, and so on, and most people probably assume that a law is the legal expression of a political ideology. One would expect the practice and activity of law to be shaped by people's political beliefs, so law might seem to emanate from ideology in a straightforward and uncontroversial way.

However, the connection between law and ideology is both complex and contentious. This is because of the diversity of definitions of ideology, and the various ways in which ideology might be related to law. Moreover, whilst the observation about law's link with ideology might seem a sociological commonplace, the link between law and ideology is more often made in a critical spirit, in order to impugn law.

At issue is an understanding of ideology as a source of manipulation. Law as ideology directs its subjects in ways that are not transparent to the subjects themselves; law, on this view, cloaks power. The ideal of law, in contrast, involves a set of institutions that regulate or restrain power with reference to norms of justice. Thus the presence of the ideological in law must, in some sense, compromise law's integrity. Not only is the view of law as ideology at odds with a lot of mainstream thinking about law, it seems difficult to reconcile with the central philosophical positions on the nature of law, e.g. a positivist conception of law as a set of formal rules, or a natural law conception where law is identified with moral principles.

Cited from Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

53. Posted by Peter (Admin 5812 posts) 11y

Quoting Q_Zhang

Quoting Peter

I just think Germany has more political bargaining power than wee Australia.

Really ? Even in Asia ?

Of course, particularly in Singapore. Singapore's entire economy virtually is based on its capacity as a trading port. Germany, as one of the world's most important manufacturing countries, would be a huge client of theirs. Australia in contrast is actually more reliant on Singapore to deliver goods than anything. Everything from oil to electronics seems to come through Singapore. Australia could not possibly afford to jeopardise that relationship. Apart from the mining sector, there's really not that much that we would export through there as far as I can tell. Not that the mining sector isn't significant.

Don't forget, we're only 20 million people here - the government just likes to punch above its weight

54. Posted by Peter (Admin 5812 posts) 11y

Quoting Q_Zhang

The running the red light is more of a case of proving intent.

Yeah, that makes sense. I doubt it was Nguyen's intent for people to die by using the drugs either. You could never pass off his actions as first degree or any degree of murder, more likely 'reckless behaviour'. Smuggling heroin, running a red light, drink driving, in any of those cases you know it could cost someone's life and yet people do those things knowing the risks. The only difference with the heroin is that those who die of it, do so knowing the risks.

I can see that heroin is a more addictive substance than tobacco. But it is in fact probably more due to its illegal status, that it is more dangerous.

For instance, everyone kicks up a fuss over safe injecting houses, etc.. "those junkies don't have any rights, we don't want to allow them to shoot up in our neighbourhood", making it very hard to help the addicts. Education on drugs is at an absolute minimum. I see very few anti-drugs ads on TV, yet anti-smoking ones are in almost every ad break. It's not an open discussion and that's what really is costing young kids lives.

I believe the greatest mistake countries make in the 'war on drugs' is to pretend that it is something that needs to be fought overseas. The real battle is in our own back streets, not in some jungle in Colombia or a transit lounge in Changi airport.

55. Posted by SeeTheSky (Respected Member 558 posts) 11y

I still say laws are designed to prevent crime.

i understand that this is a fundental part of your argument, and i know that many would say that my philosophy is too idealistic to work. and that may be true, it may not 'work'. But, the truth is, it will end useless violence. it would be a denunciation of 'an eye for an eye'. its the same reasoning why i believe america should not have gone to war in iraq.

i know that the abstract purpose is to prevent crime, but really a law will only be followed as long as it is enforced. whats the point of a law if people dont change. if the person is desperate enough, they'll risk their own lives for whatever reason regardless. in my eyes, these policies only serve to keep people from changing, keep humanity out of being human. i think if any judge had to convict his/herself of the death penalty, they wouldn't. its easy to deal death when its not your life to choose. like pete said, life is not so cut and dry that you decide someones fate from ink and paper.
i also think if the judge knew the person, it would not be as easy.
its like war vets say, its one thing to know a man died, and another to watch a man you knew die.

56. Posted by Brendan (Respected Member 1824 posts) 11y

STS I coudln't have said it better myself.. so I won't.

57. Posted by numero1 (Respected Member 295 posts) 11y

Here's a hot tip.....

I heard a rumour from a mate who works with Austrlaias largest media group that sometime early next week, or this weekend, newspapers in Australia are going to be exposing the Singapore government and judicial system for what it is - CORRUPT. A story w2ill run about other foreigners who are known drug smugglers in Singapore who are AFFORDED PROCTECTION BY THE SINGAPORE GOVERNMENT! The double standards of Singapore are about to be exposed in the newspapers here for all to read about.

Stay tuned. This is going to be huge!

58. Posted by Brendan (Respected Member 1824 posts) 11y

About one hour ago Van Nguyen was killed by the Singapore Government.

59. Posted by james (Travel Guru 4136 posts) 11y

Quoting numero1

Here's a hot tip.....

I heard a rumour from a mate who works with Austrlaias largest media group that sometime early next week, or this weekend, newspapers in Australia are going to be exposing the Singapore government and judicial system for what it is - CORRUPT. A story w2ill run about other foreigners who are known drug smugglers in Singapore who are AFFORDED PROCTECTION BY THE SINGAPORE GOVERNMENT! The double standards of Singapore are about to be exposed in the newspapers here for all to read about.

Stay tuned. This is going to be huge!

Pity they didn't publish this a few weeks ago...

60. Posted by Peter (Admin 5812 posts) 11y

I don't think those stories are anything new. It's always been a rumour as far as I know. If they can actually substantiate them, it might be interesting.

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