Skip Navigation

The way we talk....

Travel Forums General Talk The way we talk....

Page

Last Post

1. Posted by jackflash (Inactive 84 posts) 10y

I analyse the way we talk and my god it infuriates me!

I am from Leeds in Yorkshire, UK. here are some examples of how we speak:-

when answering a question about oneself, they start a sentance in 'I' and then end it in 'me' - how ridiculous is that?

"I'm alright, me"
"I like football, me"
"I'm off out, me"

heres another one:-

When we ask a question we put a probable answer in the question:-

"So are you going to the pub tonight or are you going down town"
"Are you still ill, or are you better now"
"Has he got a new job or is he still unemployed'

here is another one:-

when bumbing into an old freind, they ask first:-

"are you working?" (well not at this moment in time & why yalk about work first!)
"what you up to?" (well I'm stood here talking to you!)

I think this one is general across parts of the UK and this one grates the soul:-
when someone asks you a question, they try and bully you into agreeing with them:-

" This airport's rubbish, innit?" (innit = isn't it)
" Manchester United are the best team in England, innit?"
" Sarah is a right bitch, innit?"

well I have more but dont want to bore you all, any annoying observations from the way your people speak?

2. Posted by Twinkle (Travel Guru 1112 posts) 10y

Well Im originally from Newcastle and no matter what I do I cant shake off the undertones of this Geordie Accent, I seem to think its vanishing then Ill be in somewhere on the other side of the world and someone will pick up on it straight away!Have to admit if I hear a strong Geordie accent on tv, I cringe!!!i mean come on over the years, how many Byker Grove jokes have I heard??!?!!?i suppose the only thing I could sum up about the most extreme newcastle arguments is the fact they put "man" on the end of everything and have a penchant for using works like "belta", "aye" and y'nor"......

3. Posted by jackflash (Inactive 84 posts) 10y

oh no, not a geordie accent! you'll have troubles shaking that one off! thing is apparantley in a recent survey geordie along with the irish accent is one of the most popular and people find themselves feeling secure when in conversation with the later.

I've been visiting Newcastle since I was a little boy and my I have had difficulties understanding the broadest accents. It's another world up there!

When I was in New York, I stumbled across an american man sat at a bar watching a Uk Premiership football game, It was Newcastle United and another, pleased to see the beautiful game in th ebig apple I sat beside him. When he discovered I was English he fired all kinds of questions at me, mosty football related, but one I couldnt answer was why are Necastle inhabitants called 'Geordies'. Can you Twinkle?

4. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 10y

Quoting jackflash

When answering a question about oneself, they start a sentance in 'I' and then end it in 'me' - how ridiculous is that?

"I'm alright, me"
"I like football, me"
"I'm off out, me"

Hee hee! I went to school in a very Italian section of Montreal, and everyone started that kind of sentence with "Me, I...".

"Me, I'm OK."
"Me, I don't know what you're talking about."

It's proper to construct a sentence like that in French, so I always assumed it was the same in Italian, and then Italians just converted it into English.

5. Posted by angela_ (Respected Member 1732 posts) 10y

I just noticed another thing..
Jack, you say "I'm stood here talking to you" istead of "I'm standing here talking to you." and you also said "I stumbled across an american man sat at a bar"..

6. Posted by mally (Respected Member 199 posts) 10y

Love it . Has anyone been to Gibraltar where they speak gib-er-ish

7. Posted by Twinkle (Travel Guru 1112 posts) 10y

you know what...i dont even know why we are called Geordies...however a few of the family have the whole "proud to be geordie" attitude so at the family bash at xmas i shall find you an answer!Its funny that, when I was in New York a guy stopped me in a life to ask if I was a geordie and also went out to a party where they were all drinking Brown Ale and they thought i was some kind of legend because I actually came from this place where they brew it!They all assumed I must drink the stuff by the gallon, I hate the stuff its vile!What is it with American people and Newcastle Brown ale?!?!My housemate is obsessed woth the stuff!

8. Posted by john7buck (Respected Member 458 posts) 10y

I had a good friend from Leeds; couldn't understand a damn word he was saying half the time.

Example: He was telling me a story about a guest on the English version of Oprah (can't remember her name). She had a guest on who collected sick bugs. I'm thinking to myself, first off, how in the hell does he know they're sick? After listening to about 10 minutes of this story, I start to look very confused. Turns out, the guy collected "sick bags", or barf bags as they might be known in the states.

Just yesterday, I got an email from an Irish friend asking "how's she cuttin?". Uh, who's she? And what the hell would she be cutting?

Good thing I speak good old fashion "American", though I often wish we were a bit more creative with our language. I get a kick out of all the slang in the UK, Ireland, etc. I suppose we have our own that I don't even notice, but I think you guys take the cake.

9. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 10y

Quoting john7buck

I get a kick out of all the slang in the UK, Ireland, etc. I suppose we have our own that I don't even notice, but I think you guys take the cake.

Nothing beats Cockney Rhyming Slang. You can understand the words, but who in god's name can understand what they're saying?

10. Posted by s_hoot (Respected Member 497 posts) 10y

While i lived in England for three years i had now problem with any accents except for my one friend kim, from Yorkshire. All her words just blended into one long one, i was always saying "come again" or just "huh!" beautiful accent though, just cant understand any of it.