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Newquay (UK): Feb is a good time ??

Travel Forums Europe Newquay (UK): Feb is a good time ??

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1. Posted by happyyo (Budding Member 7 posts) 11y Star this if you like it!

Hi people :)

First thing: Merry Xmas to all !!!!

I am thinking in taking a 2/3 months break to learn surf (something I have always wanted to do). I have read that Newquay is one of the best places in UK for it but I wonder if Feb would be a good time ... I am planning to stay there in a hostel (pretty cheap compared with London :)) and look for some kind of part-time job (anything will be welcome)...
Do u know guys if it will be hard to find a job there ? What about Feb for surfing?? Maybe am i crazy ?? :)

Thanks in advance,

Cheers,
Laura
ps: any advice, suggestion, information .... about Newquay is appreciated.

2. Posted by mim (Travel Guru 1276 posts) 11y Star this if you like it!

Newquay is great as is all of cornwall for a good surfing atmosphere,

but seriously now! February is bloody cold in England, I doubt theres much surfing occuring apart from those who employ antifreeze!! ;)

check out the weather the average Feb temp is about 9 degrees celsius

good luck!

m

3. Posted by Dicken (Budding Member 31 posts) 11y Star this if you like it!

Hi Laura

There will be surfers going out in Feb-winter is the time for the best waves! You being a beginner I would really recommend learning in the summer though. This is because the waves are usually a bit more forgiving and you won't get so disheartened with falling in all the time coz it won't be so cold. I know what I talking about I went in on boxing day and took me 2 hours to thaw out!
As for learning I'd recommend paying for a weeks or a few days tuition with one to the many surf schools in the area.
Newquay its self is a bit commercial for me and I think been a bit spoiled in the past few years but you may like it. Work wise I doubt there'll be much in the off season but you could be lucky.
Good luck with everything.
Dicken:)