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Travelling round Canada July-Sept HELP!

Travel Forums North America Travelling round Canada July-Sept HELP!

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1. Posted by Sal178 (Budding Member 3 posts) 8y

Sal178 has indicated that this thread is about Canada

Hi

A friend and myself are wanting to travel around Canada for 2 months after finishing our degree this year. Can anyone give us any help on:

What we need to do, visas, flights, accommodation etc?
Where best places are to go?
Any specific things we should see?

Neither of us have travelled before, and have limited funds.

Thanks for any help given,

Sal

2. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7274 posts) 8y

Hi Sal,

Take a look at Zoom Airlines. They fly from London to most big cities across Canada at pretty good rates.

For accommodation, you can always stay in hostels. They're cheap and readily available, as long as you're comfortable sharing space with strangers.

As for things to see, I'd suggest:

  • Quebec City (historic and beautiful)
  • Montreal (best city ever!)
  • Ottawa
  • Niagara Falls (cause you just have to)

I've never been out West, but I hear it's a must-see too. You can travel across the country by train or bus, or look for the occassional cheap flight on Westjet, Canjet, or Air Canada (although good luck finding cheap anything on Air Canada).

I'm sure you'll get plenty of great advice here. Enjoy your trip!

Tway.

3. Posted by grumpybear (Budding Member 2 posts) 8y

The first thing to remember is Canada is HUGE! So the distances between cities, towns, etc. is HUGE as well, so the question on how to travel about the country is important, and what you want to see. If you are a city person, and want to wander Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal then what I am about say below may not apply as much.

I think the things Canada has to offer are usually outside of its cities (Vancouver, Victoria, Montreal, Quebec City are great though). Canada is about the wide open spaces, the beautify parks, mountains, rivers and vistas. This is truely enjoyed when you have your own set of wheels. Canada is not a public transportation friendly country as a whole. The bus and train network often take you from city core to city core where you are abandoned in a public transportation less area. Getting to the small towns, mountain parks you really need your own vehicle.

Once you have your own transportation the country opens up to you. You inexpensively go camping about the country, staying at the Provincial or Federal parks for $10-15/night and taking in the beautify country Canada truly is.

Places to see, I have western Canada bias:

1) Vancouver – Great city. You can camp in a place like Porteau Cover only 34kms from Vancouver and simply drive into Vancouver and take in what it has to offer. http://www.britishcolumbia.com/ParksAndTrails/Parks/details/?ID=53
2) Whistler
3) Victoria and Vancouver Island – Longbeach
4) Drive from Vancouver to Calgary passing through the Canadian Rockies. Suggested stops along the way:
a. Manning Park
b. Penticton-Kelown-Vernon and the Okanagan Wine Country! Great Wineries
c. Through Revelstoke and Glacier National Park
d. Yoho National Park
e. Banff-Lake Louise
f. Finally Calgary – try and hit Calgary in early July when the Calgary Stampede is on! Nothing beats it.
5) Fly Home. Into Vancouver out of Calgary or vice versa.

There are numerous car rentals and even RV/Camper Van rentals which may be an option. If you need to go on the cheap. Buy good used car in Calgary and sell it later. Calgary will most likely be cheaper place to buy as there is no Sales Tax or emission standards in Alberta vs. Vancouver/B.C..

Have fun!!

4. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7274 posts) 8y

Quoting grumpybear

Canada is not a public transportation friendly country as a whole. The bus and train network often take you from city core to city core where you are abandoned in a public transportation less area. Getting to the small towns, mountain parks you really need your own vehicle.

Montreal is extremely public-transportation friendly, and I'd venture to say that most big cities in Canada have great public-transportation systems. But you're right about far-out places - you'll need a car, or at least a long, complictaed bus route to get there. But it is possible! My boyfriend spent a year travelling from The Beauce (along the US borer) to Montreal every weekend. It took him 5 hours there and back, but at least there was a way to do it.

5. Posted by rasberries (Inactive 154 posts) 8y

i'm a travel agent in the middle of canada.
you can email me if you want to check rates.
west jet and AC have CHEEEAP domestic flights here.
check for seat sales on their websites for sure!
they pop up out of no where sometimes and only last a day or two
chek west jet now . great deals on some destinations
-snip-

Moderator comment: Personal e-mails are not allowed in the forums. Please use the Message Center. Thank you.

[ Edit: Removed e-mail address. ]

6. Posted by Brendan (Respected Member 1824 posts) 8y

Quoting tway

and I'd venture to say that most big cities in Canada have great public-transportation systems.

Canada has some of the worst public transit that I have ever come across, large-city or not. I would say the same as everyone else, go to the small places, the villages and towns in the out lying areas. Also the National Parks, the wild lands of the north.

I'm not sure what to suggest about getting around Canada. I generally fly, but any mode is going to be very expensive. One option to look into is dorms at university's, you can often rent rooms and fair rates.

[ Edit: Fixed quote ]

7. Posted by Brendan (Respected Member 1824 posts) 8y

Oh and as per the west coast, try out some Ocean-Kayaking/canoeing or some white-water rafting in the rockies.

8. Posted by Sal178 (Budding Member 3 posts) 8y

I dont know what this post about my post being SPAM is, but i can asure you that it isn't. Thankyou so much for advice and ideas so far.

It has thought up more questions. My friend and i were considering buying a car for our time over there. At the age of 22 will we be able to drive?

Also we have heard about doing Canada by train has anyone done this?

Thanks again

Sal

9. Posted by Peter P. (Budding Member 35 posts) 8y

Thanks to my business, which requires much travel, I have seen much of this great country by train and I would recommend the experience to any and all, young or old. The best experience I had was my Canadian Rockies vacation last year - I took the train across British Columbia and Alberta and will cherish that experience so much more because I didn't have to worry about navigating or pulling over or missing something special. I just kicked off my shoes and passed a few blissful hours watching the beauty roll by.

PP

10. Posted by IAMNOBODY (Budding Member 31 posts) 8y

Quoting Sal178

Hi

A friend and myself are wanting to travel around Canada for 2 months after finishing our degree this year. Can anyone give us any help on:

What we need to do, visas, flights, accommodation etc?
Where best places are to go?
Any specific things we should see?

Neither of us have travelled before, and have limited funds.

Thanks for any help given,

Sal

In two months you could see the highlights of Canada quite well. Are you more into nature or urban?

I think a trip starting in the east and heading west would be great, you would see how the country has grown over the past 140 or so years.

I think you should include one Atlantic stop. Halifax would be nice, or the St. John's area.

Quebec City and Montreal are musts, Ottawa is the capital and is really a great town and wonderful capital. Toronto and area is the heart and life blood of Canada. Included in this is Niagara Falls.

No disrespect to Northern Ontario or Manitoba/Saskatchewan, but after that I think you could fly to Calgary and do Alberta and go into BC.

So your two months would be nice if you could do say 1 week to a week and a half in Halifax with side trips to PEI and Cape Breton.

2 weeks to go from Quebec City, Montreal, Ottawa and Tornto/Niagara. 3 Days each in Quebec City and Ottawa and 4 days each in Montreal and Toronto.

The rest of the time, 4.5 weeks, spend in Alberta and BC.