Skip Navigation

Should Americans travel more?

Travel Forums General Talk Should Americans travel more?

Page

Last Post

11. Posted by majito (Respected Member 442 posts) 10y

Given the terrorism paranoia campaign supplied courtesy of the Bush regime I would be surprised if any of them thought it was worth the risk. He makes it sound dangerous enough inside the US never mind leaving the mainland and being exposed to all that "terror."

I just hope that young American kids don't start travelling as self-titled "cultural ambassadors" or "agents of understanding" instead of plain old simple people getting away from it all and come what may.

On the other hand if they get out more they might start accepting responsibility for actions and events caused by their govt. They might just realise what the world really thinks of them. They might just understand that people are different and others beliefs and ways of life must be tolerated, respected, and most importantly - left alone.

12. Posted by coldwarspy (Travel Guru 1108 posts) 10y

interesting post. I thought Lonely Planet was an Ozzie publication?

Im goin to be Devils Advocate here and say first that most Europeans I meet dont really care that Americans dont travel - or rather glad that we dont! I dont know about other continents but the amount of American Crap i put up with is astounding here! ;)

But I feel the same way - I left America for a good reason - Americans! - and seeing them here is unnerving...But I have met some great ones who travel, and like Majito - they should see what damage we cause with our "foriegn" policy.

13. Posted by majito (Respected Member 442 posts) 10y

Lonely Planet started as an Aussie publication; head office is in Melbourne, but its not Aussie. The Sydney morning newspapers are Aussie as they concern themselves mainly with local news and Australian opinion. Lonely Planet is global; the writers are multinational,and the biggest selling book is NZ sold out of Europe. So who knows what the heck it is.

Let me quote and edited version of a story from this mornings Sydney Morning Herald:
Headline: "Warming gives travel visionaries the chills." Mark Ellingham, the creator of Rough Guides, and Tony Wheeler, who founded Lonely Planet, want travellers to fly less and stay longer and donate money to carbon offsetting schemes. From next month warnings will appear inall new editions about the impact of global warming. Both said they would not fly less.

So LP is encouraging US citizens to fly and others to not? Is this their way of on one hand increasing book sales in the US, and on the other playing good corporate citizen. Perhaps we've all been duped.

14. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 10y

Quoting majito

Lonely Planet started as an Aussie publication; head office is in Melbourne, but its not Aussie.

I'm not sure how you can't consider it Australian. It's privately owned by Australians and run from Australia. Even if it sells to an international market, it is still considered Australian.

15. Posted by Daver141 (Respected Member 117 posts) 10y

Couple of things: First off, I agree, most Americans don't travel. I just got back from 4 months in SE Asia, and may have seen 20 Americans along the way. I had similar experiences in the Middle East and Europe.

Based on the way a lot of my fellow Americans think about the world as of late, combined with their general lack of knowledge and understanding of history, geography (when asked by a lawyer friend of mine what was my favorite place in my recent travels, I responded "Laos", to which he asked, "What country is that in"....)and religion, its not surprising nor all that terrible.

Allow me to assure the world, we aren't bad people, we are just children with atom bombs, and we are afraid of people with funny accents at the moment (especially if one is from Glasgow ).

I will say this: If I had a dollar (or even better a Euro) for every time I was quoted the "60% of Americans don't have passports" stat I could have stayed in SE Asia for another 4 months easily.

On the other hand, perhaps if more Americans went out into the World, we would have less of a desire to blow up large portions of it.

16. Posted by maba (Inactive 227 posts) 10y

I've met some great travellers from all over the globe in my travels - including 'yanks'. I expect to meet some more on my trip to Italy in April.

Obviously most of the 'USA clan' on TP are well informed so may not be a true representation of the typical American we are talking about. TP is a good leveler, where you realise we are all fairly similar underneath.

I am really intrigued to see if Americans are as portrayed to the outside world so, I am seriously toying with the idea of taking a road trip around the USA to see for myself.

I wonder how many know where the bloody hell Australia is?

17. Posted by majito (Respected Member 442 posts) 10y

Pete, Lonely Planet was born in Australia, lives in Australia, but the context of the question was leaning towards is it Australian by way of opinion or attitude, or does it write to an Australian audience. It doesn't. LP's an unbiased guide book publisher (apparently unbiased). So its a pointless referring to or making opinions of Australia because of something a LP says. Which is lucky because I would hate for a hostel in Pakistan to get a bad write up from LP, and for the locals to take it out on us in the way they did on the Danes for publishing those pictures. :(

18. Posted by coldwarspy (Travel Guru 1108 posts) 10y

OH! ur right about Americanos on TP and most who travel are sound and make me proud that we are not all just rednecks and neo-cons!

But if u decide to do a road trip to the US you WILL find that the stereotype - like most steroetypes - are true - we are ignorant, dumb, and isolated. Stay in the big cities and youl'l be fine. go to the burbs and you'll understand why i left.

19. Posted by sacmike03 (Budding Member 60 posts) 10y

Hey,
I recently got back from 4 months in Australia and 2 months in S.E.Asia. I came across a lot people who had really warped idea of what Americans are like. Most poeple were just surprised i wasnt fat and didnt eat McDonald's everyday. There is about 280 million of us. We are not all rich white people and we are not all ignorant redneck hicks. But of course, some of us are. One of my guides in Oz was asking me questions about the US and i started talking about the southern US and he asked me if i meant Mexico. He didnt realize it was its owm country, but i know you all aren't that uninformed. I met a few Americans along the way that i could have done without meeting, but the same goes for a bunch of other nationalities too.
I have traveled a lot and always incourage my friends and family to do the same. It is good to realize there are things much bigger then you are out in the world.

20. Posted by vampyren (Budding Member 39 posts) 10y

Well said Sacmike!

I think you have proved some of the points I was making... especially the one about the fact that knowledge of the world should be made availabe to everyone, wether by travelling or some other means