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Irish food and pubs

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1. Posted by IronChef (Full Member 1075 posts) 8y

IronChef has indicated that this thread is about Ireland

Hello all. I am working on writing a menu for an American Grill/Irish Bar. The restaurant will be opening in June and I am in the process of developing some new recipes and trying to get some ideas about traditional Irish food and flavors.

I would love to get some suggestions or maybe web-links to restaurants or pubs. Wish I had the time to take a quick trip and 'eat and drink' my way through Ireland but maybe y'all can give me a hand.

Thanks!

2. Posted by smythy (Full Member 237 posts) 8y

you'll have to put "the Ulster Fry" on your menu man!

thats 2 bacon, 1 or 2 eggs, 2 sausages, 2 fried bread, fried potatoes, fried tomatoes.

Fancy that at 6 or 8 in the morning to start a days work! Will keep ya going to mid afternoon at least.

Absolutely gorgeous - my specialty before a days climbing in the mountains.

3. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7274 posts) 8y

Oh, no! Not the Ulster fry! All I could eat was the "bacon" and toast... Edd, you forgot to mention those sausages are BLOOD sausages!

I particulary liked The Northern Whig, in Belfast - a little traditional mixed with modern. And I'm still madly in love with Queen of Tarts, this absolutely dream-like pastry shop in Dublin. Their desserts and their coffee are out of this world...

4. Posted by IronChef (Full Member 1075 posts) 8y

Thanks for the link Tway:). The Whig must be part of a larger parent company lots of links through there.

But where's the traditional. I feel like everybody is doing this fusion thing. Or is that the way - lots of curries and chiles in the food?

cied mille failte!

5. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7274 posts) 8y

Curry and chips are served EVERYWHERE. They have little shops everywhere called 'chippies' that specialize in the stuff, and all the restaurants put it on the menu. This was Neal's idea of going out for 'a Chinese': sliced chicken breast, french fries, curry sauce, and a Diet Coke.

I'll ask him about more 'traditional' Irish fare and get back to you - although expect french fries in the mix. His mother even made us lasagna once and put the slab of pasta on top of a pile of fries!

6. Posted by jeni646 (Budding Member 2 posts) 8y

To the guy who said about the stuff in an ulster fry, there are no fried potatoes, it is potato bread and soda bread and to the other guy who said about the 'blood sausages' they are not blood sausages, you're thinking of black pudding in an english breakfast. totally different lol.

7. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7274 posts) 8y

Quoting jeni646

and to the other guy who said about the 'blood sausages' they are not blood sausages, you're thinking of black pudding in an english breakfast. totally different lol.

I'm the girl who said about the blood sausages - they were served in Dublin and in Belfast and called an "Ulster Fry". Perhaps there are different ingredients for the same dish...

8. Posted by jeni646 (Budding Member 2 posts) 8y

I've lived in the region of ulster all my life and have never heard of a blood sausage being served as part of an ulster fry.
And Dublin isn't even in ulster, so i'd be very surprised if they served ulster fries.

9. Posted by smythy (Full Member 237 posts) 8y

Quoting jeni646

And Dublin isn't even in ulster, so i'd be very surprised if they served ulster fries.

Wot about Barcelona? call that in ulster - ive seen it advertised on the "Ramblas" and when i went to get it they didnt have bacon, nor sausages, nor any eggs left is what they told us so we left and went elsewhere for grub - imagine advertising an ulster fry and then leaving out half the stuff!

10. Posted by Isadora (Moderator 13924 posts) 7y

Quoting tway

Quoting jeni646

and to the other guy who said about the 'blood sausages' they are not blood sausages, you're thinking of black pudding in an english breakfast. totally different lol.

I'm the girl who said about the blood sausages - they were served in Dublin and in Belfast and called an "Ulster Fry". Perhaps there are different ingredients for the same dish...

Almost everywhere we traveled in Ireland/N. Ireland - it was called Ulster Fry or Irish Fry. Both versions came with "black pudding" (blood sausage). The Irish Fry always included baked beans but the Ulster Fry included them some of the time.

In Killarney, we had dinner at a great pub. I want to say it was O'Connor's Traditional Pub but I honestly can't state that as fact. They had one of the best Guinness (beef) stews I have ever tasted. Instead of including the diced/quartered potatoes in with the rest of the ingredients, they served the stew over mashed.

Also, keep in mind that bacon in Ireland is equal to the ham served with our breakfasts. Rashers are the equal of our sliced bacon strips.

[ Edit: Edited on Mar 27, 2007, at 3:46 AM by Isadora ]