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What are the Best Cities to Live in England?

Travel Forums Europe What are the Best Cities to Live in England?

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111. Posted by ruca4 (First Time Poster 1 posts) 7y

I am looking to move to the UK in hopes of finding a teaching position. I currently live in Ontario, Canada, where unfortunately teaching jobs are very scarce. I have an Honours Bachelors Degree and well as my Education degree in Primary Ed (Kindergarten-Grade 6). I know England has many more teaching jobs, and that teachers educated in North America are usually received quite well because of the quality of education we receive. I'm just curious if anyone knew what would be some of the best cities to teach in? Which ones have a higher demand, better salary, better programs, etc. My fiance's parents live in Norther Ireland and he would love to go there, but I'm not sure how easy it is to find a teaching job there. I know there's a lot of recruitment companies that come to our schools here for England. We're still quite young so would enjoy a good nightlife, but better weather, nice people, and affordable housing are also important! I know he'd also be hapy in Manchester just because of the football association, and we also have some friends in Sheffield that quite enjoy it.
Any input would be appreciated! :)

112. Posted by bertles86 (Inactive 108 posts) 7y

ruca4:

The better salaries are down South, for teaching jobs look in the home counties (Kent/Sussex/Surrey/Bucks/Herts/Cam etc). There are plenty of teaching jobs up North in the cities - Liverpool, Manchester, Preston etc but salaries are worse because of the N/S divide. In the inner cities be prepared for little scally twats of children, so it really depends on how tough you are! Northern Ireland is not exactly the employment centre of the UK, outside of Belfast unless you're a farmer there's not much going for it. Nice place don't get me wrong but bugger all jobs! So if you're young and looking for an okay salary start in places like: Maidstone, Epsom, Eastbourne, Brighton, Watford, Crawley, Guildford, Woking and Reading...

113. Posted by BedouinLeo (Inactive 698 posts) 7y

Quoting bertles86

ruca4:

The better salaries are down South, for teaching ...

I have friends who have moved away from London and Surrey because their teaching jobs in Lancashire pay better.
So not always the south. Sometimes maybe, but not always.

114. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 7y

Pay for teachers doing equivalent full-time jobs is the same across the country, apart from London where you get an additional payment for the increased cost of living. You can find the pay scales here.

This doesn't apply to agency/supply teaching.

115. Posted by BedouinLeo (Inactive 698 posts) 7y

Quoting magykal1

Pay for teachers doing equivalent full-time jobs is the same across the country, apart from London where you get an additional payment for the increased cost of living. You can find the pay scales here.

This doesn't apply to agency/supply teaching.

I think its down to the basic fact that there are more hours available in some schools for teachers in different areas.
The pay scale is the same but it's all pro-rata. So the more hours you do, the more money you earn.

116. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 7y

Teachers are salaried and are paid the same regardless of how many hours they work for their school, unless they are agency staff.

It could be that there are more opportunities for teachers to take on additional work outside of their jobs, private tuition for example?

117. Posted by BedouinLeo (Inactive 698 posts) 7y

Quoting magykal1

Teachers are salaried and are paid the same regardless of how many hours they work for their school, unless they are agency staff.

It could be that there are more opportunities for teachers to take on additional work outside of their jobs, private tuition for example?

I think maybe you are missing the point.
Some teachers work less hours than others and that will affect their wage.
Schools in some areas do more hours per week than others. Some even do Saturdays which results in quite a lot more money being paid for those who go in. I am not sure how many schools open in the south of England on a Saturday, but there are quite a lot in the north.

118. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 7y

Quoting BedouinLeo

Quoting magykal1

Teachers are salaried and are paid the same regardless of how many hours they work for their school, unless they are agency staff.

It could be that there are more opportunities for teachers to take on additional work outside of their jobs, private tuition for example?

I think maybe you are missing the point.
Some teachers work less hours than others and that will affect their wage.
Schools in some areas do more hours per week than others. Some even do Saturdays which results in quite a lot more money being paid for those who go in. I am not sure how many schools open in the south of England on a Saturday, but there are quite a lot in the north.

Thanks, but I'm not missing the point at all. What you are saying is simply not the case. If you're a full-time teacher and you work in England you will be paid the same regardless of how many hours you work, so it makes no difference whereabouts in the country you work (apart from London where there's a little bit more because of the cost of living allowance). The difference that I could see would be that the cost of living in, for example, Hull would be rather less than the cost of living in, for example, Guildford so you would end up with more disposable income.

Of course, if you've been working as a teacher for longer and have progressed up the scale you will be paid a bit more, likewise if you take on extra responsibility (Head of Department or whatever) you'd get some extra money for that. But there is no money for extra hours. The pro-rata bit comes in for part-time jobs, 'cause people are paid the equivalent rate for the full-time job for the part that they work. It doesn't work the other way round though, you can't get more than full-time pay! As I've stated already, this doesn't apply to agency staff who would get the extra money (but don't get most of the other benefits that come with a teaching job).

119. Posted by BedouinLeo (Inactive 698 posts) 7y

Quoting magykal1

Quoting BedouinLeo

Quoting magykal1

Teachers are salaried and are paid the same regardless of how many hours they work for their school, unless they are agency staff.

It could be that there are more opportunities for teachers to take on additional work outside of their jobs, private tuition for example?

I think maybe you are missing the point.
Some teachers work less hours than others and that will affect their wage.
Schools in some areas do more hours per week than others. Some even do Saturdays which results in quite a lot more money being paid for those who go in. I am not sure how many schools open in the south of England on a Saturday, but there are quite a lot in the north.

Thanks, but I'm not missing the point at all. What you are saying is simply not the case. If you're a full-time teacher and you work in England you will be paid the same regardless of how many hours you work, so it makes no difference whereabouts in the country you work (apart from London where there's a little bit more because of the cost of living allowance). The difference that I could see would be that the cost of living in, for example, Hull would be rather less than the cost of living in, for example, Guildford so you would end up with more disposable income.

Of course, if you've been working as a teacher for longer and have progressed up the scale you will be paid a bit more, likewise if you take on extra responsibility (Head of Department or whatever) you'd get some extra money for that. But there is no money for extra hours. The pro-rata bit comes in for part-time jobs, 'cause people are paid the equivalent rate for the full-time job for the part that they work. It doesn't work the other way round though, you can't get more than full-time pay! As I've stated already, this doesn't apply to agency staff who would get the extra money (but don't get most of the other benefits that come with a teaching job).

Well, there is much more to talk about on this website than teachers pay. However, I live with a head teacher and we have moved all over the UK over the last 20 years with her job so I think I know more than a thing or two about what I'm saying. But I'll leave it there. You can have the last word if you like.

120. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 7y

Thanks, I will.

I work for an education authority, and despite being pretty certain that I was correct I did quickly check with my colleagues who are responsible for sorting out teachers' pay.

Let me sum up, for the benefit of the original poster. There is a national salary scale for teachers employed in state schools in England. This applies wherever you work in England, apart from London where there is a small additional payment because of the higher cost of living.

There is no additional payment available for working extra hours for the school that you are employed by. Extra money would be available if you had extra responsibility, or if you have worked as a teacher for some time and therefore progressed up the salary scale. Some teachers make some extra money by, for example, offering some private tuition outside of school. This doesn't apply to independent schools who can pay what they like, but generally use the national salary scale as a minimum. It also doesn't apply to agency staff, who are generally paid by the hour but don't recieve any of the benefits that full-time teaching staff enjoy.

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