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2nd passport/citizenship

Travel Forums General Talk 2nd passport/citizenship

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31. Posted by Bogman (Budding Member 61 posts) 10y

Quoting drixo

Quoting Bogman

Allow me to be the first to wade in with 3 passports, and a US Green Card.

I'm British by birth, Canadian by naturalization, Irish by marriage, and got a US Green Card last year owing to my job.

Love it!!

Nice work! What's next on your agenda?

I think that's enough...no leads on any other although if Quebec separates (not bloody likely) then I'd qualify for that passport too.

32. Posted by auspolak (Budding Member 36 posts) 10y

Quoting Bogman

Allow me to be the first to wade in with 3 passports, and a US Green Card.

I'm British by birth, Canadian by naturalization, Irish by marriage, and got a US Green Card last year owing to my job.

Love it!!

All you would practically need now is an Australian Passport, neither of them would let you in this country without a Visa, let alone to live and work....

33. Posted by SuperBrat (Full Member 107 posts) 10y

So whats the difference again between having citizenship and being a passport holder of a certain country?
Im marrying a British, but Malaysians arent allowed to have a Malaysian AND a British passport. So I guess I'll just get a spouse visa which gives me the right to live and work, so no great shakes really. Dont know if I want to give up my Malaysian passport in exchange for a British one... non-EU passport holders breeze through passport control a lot quicker in most European airports cos we make up a minority. Who saus there weren't any benefits? ;) Hehehe! So no issues travel wise then
I just think that a British one would open more doors when it came to legal stuff like buying property or getting a job in the EU

34. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 10y

Quoting SuperBrat

So whats the difference again between having citizenship and being a passport holder of a certain country?

No difference really. A passport is simply the document that you need to be able to travel as a citizen of that country. Most people don't have any passport at all, simply because they never leave their country.

I wouldn't give up your citizenship either if I were you. As long as you can get permanent residency, there's not a great deal of difference. And you can always hope for the day when Malaysia might allow dual citizenships. It's one of those things that countries have slowly been allowing.

35. Posted by soholly (Budding Member 5 posts) 10y

As someone said earlier, the U.S. allows dual citizenship. The big "BUT" is that if you affirmatively go out and APPLY for citizenship of another country, vs say, marrying a foreign national, chances are you will lose your US citizenship.

36. Posted by julialyy (First Time Poster 1 posts) 10y

Hi,

I just want to add that a second passport IS possible to
obtain without the residence requirement,for a price of course.
I am a russian national who had extremly poor visa-free
travel and obtained the Guyana Passport a year ago from
these guys: -snip-

[ Edit: sorry, no promos in the forum please. ]

37. Posted by GregW (Travel Guru 2635 posts) 10y

While the above post will probably get marked as SPAM and deleted by somebody, I just gotta say that I think it is hilarious that a company is out there offering up citizenship in countries like that. Especially the diplomatic passports.

I can't imagine that company can't have their offices "audited" by the CIA on occasion.

38. Posted by penna (Full Member 110 posts) 10y

My grandparents on my mothers side are irish (my grandmother arrived in australia 7 months pregnant with my mum) . My fathers mother was also irish but my father was born here. My question is can i apply for an irish passport claiming ancestory?? i was told that it had to be my fathers fathers side is this true? (i was told by someone i dearly love but dont consider a reliable source of info on things like this). Do i have to live in ireland for years befor i can apply??

39. Posted by GregW (Travel Guru 2635 posts) 10y

Lou.C.

Check out this site: Irish citizenship through birth or descent. According to what they say...

If you were born outside Ireland to an Irish citizen who was himself or herself born outside Ireland and any of your grandparents were born in Ireland, then you are entitled to become an Irish citizen. However before you can claim Irish citizenship, you must have your birth registered in the Foreign Births Register, which is maintained by the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs. (See "How to apply" below). If you live abroad, you must apply to have your birth registered through your nearest Irish embassy or consular office. If you are entitled to register, your Irish citizenship is effective from the date of registration - not from the date when you were born.

Irish grandparents

If you are of the third or subsequent generation born abroad to an Irish citizen (in other words, one of your grandparents is an Irish citizen but none of your parents was born in Ireland), you may be entitled to become an Irish citizen. You will need to apply have your birth registered in the Foreign Births Register.

If you are entitled to register, your Irish citizenship is effective from the date of registration. The Irish citizenship of successive generations may be maintained in this way by each generation ensuring their registration in the Foreign Births Register before the birth of the next generation.

40. Posted by penna (Full Member 110 posts) 10y

gregw thank you so much for this information, u can sleep ery well tonight knowing that u mde atleast one person realllllly happy