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Europe for 1 Year.. Do i need Schengen Visa????

Travel Forums Europe Europe for 1 Year.. Do i need Schengen Visa????

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101. Posted by hi8u3ri (Budding Member 8 posts) 7y

oops, weird double post, sorry..

[ Edit: Edited on 05-Jul-2009, at 21:39 by hi8u3ri ]

102. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

1) Provided you meet the other visa conditions (which you seem to), you can stay in the Schengen area on a C-type visa for 90 days in every 180 days. Three months in, six months out, three months in, six months out... I believe this answers your question: if not, I don't understand it

2) Afaiu, the kind people of immihelp are referring to a multiple-entry short-stay visa here. Same principle as the regular thing, but you can exit and enter the Schengen area as often as you like. Even if there is special visa regime for flight crews etc that I don't know of, your situation will definitely not qualify as a special interest in the Schengen area.

3) In your case: yes. As a US citizen, you are exempted from applying for a provisional residence permit. I don't understand the remainder of your question; apart from the short-stay C visa, there are no other options to travel within the Schengen area.

4) Almost certainly: yes. On a C-type visa, you are prohibited to do any kind of labour, paid or unpaid. For the Netherlands I am 100% sure this is the case, and since these rules tend to be the same throughout the Schengen area, they are likely to be for the other countries, too.

5) Short answer: it isn't, really. The bottom line is that you can come and travel around for 90 days, and that's it. You could try to stay longer by having a valid reason to do so in each individual country so that you can apply for a D-type visa, but that would not affect the 90-days-in-180-days regime of the short-stay visa.

A final comment: I am rather surprised that you found an employer willing to see to you getting a D-type visa for the Netherlands. For a volunteer job only, the rules don't allow this. Frankly, this sounds WAY too good to be true: are you sure this hostel is reliable? If they're not, and you would start to work with them without the necessary paperwork, this would land you in serious trouble.

103. Posted by hi8u3ri (Budding Member 8 posts) 7y

bentivogli,
You've been a great help. The hostel I am going to work at will apply with some sort of fast track procedure and obtain a residence and work permit for their volunteers, so I am fairly confident that this is very legitimate. I had to send proof that I was recently a student.

Based on your response and my collective research, it seems to me that the only way to stay beyond my 90 initial days in the Netherlands (or Schengen region) is to obtain a type D visa (residence permit). I'll be in the Netherlands two months, leaving about another month for free travel in the Schengen region.

I will try talking with some of the other volunteer places (Spain, etc) to see if I can obtain additional type D visas for their country after the 90 day type C visa expires, even if it is unlikely. If I am able to obtain type D visas for other places, would that solve my problems (unless I want to leave the Schengen region)? I would have to get this from each country I wanted to visit then, which will be a pain if even possible. Also, won't a type D visa (from Spain, for instance) allow me to transit through other countries to get there? Thanks friend!

-Jon

104. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 7y

1) If issued a C+D Schengen visa (say, for the Netherlands), how long do I need to wait before reapplying for the "c" part after it expires (90 days), if it is possible to reapply? It would be nice to have a year D visa in the netherlands and then keep reapplying for a c visa to continue travel.

1) Provided you meet the other visa conditions (which you seem to), you can stay in the Schengen area on a C-type visa for 90 days in every 180 days. Three months in, six months out, three months in, six months out... I believe this answers your question: if not, I don't understand it

To clear this up:

As a US-citizen you cannot get a C-type visa. Thus you cannot get a D+C type visa either. You'd be issued a D-type visa only. The reason you cannot get a C-type visa is because you don't need it, you enter visa-free and only get an entry stamp at the airport. But for this visa-free period the same rules as for the C-type visa apply.

Say you get a D-type visa for the Netherlands: You'd be allowed to travel visa-free around the other Schengen countries for 90 days out of 180.

And to correct Bentivogli: it is 91 days out, not 6 months. So over a year it is 90 days in, 91 days out, 90 days in, 91 days out. The 91 days are counted from the day you last left the Schengen area. You can come back sooner (no rules against that as long as it is not longer than the 90 days in a 180 day period rule), but to get the full 90 days again you need to stay away for 91 days.

If you got a D-type visa the country you got the visa for is excluded from that day count.

[ Edit: Edited on 08-Jul-2009, at 01:21 by t_maia ]

105. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

you're absolutely right, Maia, thanks for correcting me. Must have had my mind on other things when I wrote the first part of that reply... sorry for confusing you, Jon!

106. Posted by hi8u3ri (Budding Member 8 posts) 7y

You folks have been a great help and not confusing. One final question, t_maia:

You said:
"If you got a D-type visa the country you got the visa for is excluded from that day count."

Unless I misunderstood, this means that I could enter the Schengen region and have (or immediately obtain) a type d visa (residence permit) for a certain country...Then if I stayed only in that certain country for 90 or more days, I could still have 90 days in the Schengen region upon leaving the country that I had a residence permit for? Forgetting what I know about the C+D visa, is this a universal rule for any Schengen country, or do you know of a few in particular that are this way? I will make inquiries and do research for each country I suppose.

Let me know if this question doesn't make sense. If you had any links off the top of your head, great. If not, I have faith I can eventually find them. Thanks again!

-Jon

107. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 7y

Unless I misunderstood, this means that I could enter the Schengen region and have (or immediately obtain) a type d visa (residence permit) for a certain country...Then if I stayed only in that certain country for 90 or more days, I could still have 90 days in the Schengen region upon leaving the country that I had a residence permit for?

That is debateable.

Current consensus among visa and immigration officials is that you need a valid residency permit when you travel onwards. So if your residency permit is up, your stay in Schengen is also up.

Say you apply for a residency permit in Germany (as a US citizen you can do this in Germany, you do not have to do this in advance). Your first 90 days are visa-free, Germany gives you this time to apply for the residency permit. If you get a temporary residency permit for 4 months you'll be forced to either apply for a new residency permit (in Germany or elsewhere) after those 4 months are up or leave the Schengen area completely.

Another, minority view is that you can travel on without a valid residency permit - but I wouldn't count on it. I especiallly wouldn't argue on that point with the immigration officials.

So you should have a residency permit while you travel.

108. Posted by joejoechen (Budding Member 5 posts) 7y

Wow, great thread, and great posts T_maia..

I'm from Malaysia and I, too plan on traveling to Europe for 6 months to a year (happens 2 years later). Yeah I know it's a long time to plan but I still need to figure out the nitty gritty so I could go to sleep at night, I've been so excited about this every day ever since I had this idea in mind!

However, I'm not really sure how would the Visa issue work on me, could you elaborate more on this part?

Also, I'm curious, about the Budget issue, how much would necessary be "Enough", I've read about inns, and others even set up tents to save cost, but from professional travelers' point of view, what is the best method that I could figure out the rough sum?

I'd gladly pick up any books, or guides to help me out in my 1) Budget planning, and my 2) Trip planning. I don't have to buy things, but I want to get the most experience out of my trip - meeting nice people, great sceneries..

Please give me a pointer or two on this. Thanks dudes!

Joe

109. Posted by xjessie007 (Budding Member 22 posts) 7y

Quoting joejoechen

However, I'm not really sure how would the Visa issue work on me, could you elaborate more on this part?

Also, I'm curious, about the Budget issue, how much would necessary be "Enough", I've read about inns, and others even set up tents to save cost, but from professional travelers' point of view, what is the best method that I could figure out the rough sum?

Hi dude :),

I think the schengen visa has been described in many posts, but if you need a more comprehensive guide, here is a pretty good site that I used in my process - schengen visa. Speaking of the budget, depends on which country you go to. UK is very expensive. Bulgaria is very cheap. On average, I would count on having at least $30/day for accommodation, $20/day for food, $10/day for transportation, $20/day for tickets. This is the minimum, better to have more.

110. Posted by jells (Inactive 1 posts) 7y

Apologies if this was covered elsewhere...this thread has become quite long!

I am an American citizen living in Ireland under a work authorisation permit which allows me legal residence in Ireland until Jan 2011 and thereafter on a two year renewable basis. Given that I've been living in Ireland for nearly five years now, I travel to the continent/Schengen area several times a year both for business and pleasure.

My question is when does the "180 day period" kick off? I am able to work remotely, so have been travelling around the Schegen area for July and August. I had hoped to continue on spending approximately half of my time in the Netherlands, Switzerland and France (staying with partner and friends) and the other half of my time back home in Ireland. I am not and do not plan to work outside of Ireland as I still have my job here.

The easy answer is that the 180 days starts on the first day I arrived in the Schegen area back in early July. However, I was in Spain for five days back in March, so technically that could have started my 180 day period, thereby ending in September and restarting another 180 day period.

Any thoughts?

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