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Europe for 1 Year.. Do i need Schengen Visa????

Travel Forums Europe Europe for 1 Year.. Do i need Schengen Visa????

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21. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Hello jmavro

I have been living in Germany, for 4 years.
I have had quite a lot of trouble, with the visas, even though i am from a European union country.
The reason i have the trouble, is because i dont work. We live on my boyfriends wages.
I stopped going to the foreigners office, when they sent me the letters, because it took so much time, and they always had this and that requirement, in order for me to be allowed to stay. They sent a few more letter, which i ignored. Now i have heard nothing from them, for over 2 years.
U could try ignoring them, about the visas. I think they wont bother to chase after US citizens, unless u do a crime. And the borders of Europe are loosely guarded, with very few passport checks. Just do the dumb act, and tell them u forgot or didnt understand. The authorities in most countries are uninterested in hassling tourists.

Mel

22. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Hello Mc obrien

I just read your post. (number 11)
Do nothing. If u go to the authorities, to ask them about this, u are forcing them to do something, when they would otherwise ignore u. If any authorities question u about your visa, just tell the truth. They will likely wave u on, after a few questions.

Mel

23. Posted by sanpedro72 (Budding Member 9 posts) 9y

I've been following this fun thread. So, I don't know if you guys know anything about Latvia, but if I, a US citizen, overstay my 90 day Visa, what is the worse that can happen when I leave the country? * Say, when they check passports for departures at the airports?

24. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 9y

@ Mel:

Acting dumb is dumb for you. One day you might want to work in Germany, and then you will need a work permit and other papers and so on. Or you decide to get married. For this you need legal residence.

Point is, after a certain time of having a Aufenthaltserlaubnis (=conditional residence permit) you can get a Niederlassungserlaubnis (=permanent residence permit) or even German citizenship. If you ignore the Ausländerbehörde, this will bite you into the arse when you apply for Niederlassungserlaubnis.

I really recommend that you check your legal status.

@ sanpedro

Latvia is not part of Schengen (yet). It will be one day within the next 10 years or so, but until that day we all have to sit and wait.

This thread was about Schengen visa, which I know a bit about. Latvia would be pure guess work on my part.

25. Posted by ohmatthew (First Time Poster 1 posts) 9y

I've been in a scandanavian country for 4 months now, with a basic 90 day tourist visa, and am intending to travel to other countries in the schengen in a few weeks. I have a return flight back to the states out of London right before Christmas (in about two months).

Will my passport be inspected when I enter Great Britain? Are there any methods of travel in which it will be less likely that I'll have to show my passport, revealing how naughty and unethical of a traveller I've been?

Does anyone have experience with over staying in the schengen (by about 3 motnhs, +/-)? And the type of consequences escaped or experienced?

thanks in advance

26. Posted by frprovis (Budding Member 3 posts) 9y

Does anyone have experience with over staying in the schengen (by about 3 motnhs, +/-)? And the type of consequences escaped or experienced?

In 2003, I flew into Paris on about March 30 and flew out of Paris on about Sep 15, and received no hassles from the airport officials, even though I had clearly overstayed by almost 90 days.

In 2004, I flew into Madrid on about March 30 and flew out of Madrid on about Sep 15, and received no hassles from the airport officials, even though I had clearly overstayed by almost 90 days. I had managed to get my passport wet and so the officials did want me to show another piece of photo identification (I used a drivers license) to confirm my identity.

In 2006 (this year), I flew into Madrid on about March 30 and flew out of Madrid on Oct 24, and received no hassles from the airport officials, even though I had clearly overstayed by over 90 days.

Eventually, the computers will catch up with people like me. But so far things have worked fine. My plan all along, if questioned about overstaying, was to explain that I had only spent 90 days in any one European country (this was actually true, in all cases listed above), and thus was not in violation of the law. t_maia has clearly explained why this explanation is invalid, but assuming I start babbling in ungrammatical and poorly pronounced spanish/french AND I look like what I am (a backpacker, in the sense of someone who carries a tent in his backpack for camping in the mountains) AND I insist over and over about the 90 days rule that I got from my travel book without appearing to understand anything about Schengen, it is almost certain I would have gotten through. But I should note here that I have much experience dealing with police and getting off scot-free where other people in the same position would have been through in jail. Don't try imitating me if you are not similarly naturally lucky.

DO NOT try what I have described above with the Greeks, since they are the strictest about the 90 in 180 rule, or so I've been told. I plan on visiting Greek myself on my next long trip, hence the research I'm doing now about Schengen. Note that there was once a proposal floating around for a visa which allows 180 days of travel in the Schengen area, provided only 90 was spent in any one country, which was intended specifically to handle the case of people like me. Obviously, this proposal presents problems of verification: how do you prove you spent 90 days in Spain and 90 in France when there is no border control between the two? See:

http://www.southern-cross-group.org/archives/Non-EU%20Nationals%20in%20the%20EU/Regulation%20on%20Short%20Intra-EU%20Travel/Commission_Proposal_Short_Term_Intra_EU_Travel_10_July_2001.pdf

[ Edit: Edited at Nov 8, 2006 1:07 PM by frprovis ]

27. Posted by Loulabella (Budding Member 37 posts) 9y

i actually agree with mel, immigration is so slack in the EU, one of my best friends has been there illegally for about 8 months, even when she flies from say germany to italy and goes through pass control nothing happens - it seems people working in immigration are either unable to count or unaware of the laws of their country. i was drug search in france on the way back to switzerland - kept for questioning for about two hours and still no-one checked the status of my visa (which had run out 2 weeks earlier). The laws are too confusing and too restrictive which is why playing dumb works so well - if the laws were straight forward then u would just look like a moron, but u would not be the first person with a little nouse to be confused by the european immigration laws. dont stress, it is easier to receive forgiveness than permission

28. Posted by Bilancini8 (Budding Member 4 posts) 9y

I stayed in Italy for a five-month period. After communicating with a few others on travellerspoint who seemed to be in my predicament of overstaying, I actually went to the US Embassy and got a new temporary passport.

I was traveling from Italy via Germany to the U.S. and though all the Italians said "don't worry about it!" I didn't want to risk any trouble. The Customs Official in Germany did question me and was definitely looking for my date of entry. I explained this was a new passport and that I'd been traveling in Italy without saying how long I'd actually been in Europe. He stamped me and let me through.

Another woman I spoke to informed me that while leaving Greece after a 25 day overstay, she was given a fine -- she was stopped in Crete at customs, given a special stamp and a ticket, and was allowed to board her flight. She was allowed to pay her fine upon returning to the U.S. It seems that the options are to either pay a fine, or submit to being banned from the Schengen countries for something like five years. The fines may also be heavier depending on the length of your overstay. Risking a ban to Italy for five years just wasn't worth it to me but if you don't think you'll return to Europe for five years, that choice is yours.

29. Posted by michab (Budding Member 13 posts) 9y

Quoting frprovis

Does anyone have experience with over staying in the schengen (by about 3 motnhs, +/-)? And the type of consequences escaped or experienced?

[quote]In 2003, I flew into Paris on about March 30 and flew out of Paris on about Sep 15, and received no hassles from the airport officials, even though I had clearly overstayed by almost 90 days.

DO NOT try what I have described above with the Greeks, since they are the strictest about the 90 in 180 rule, or so I've been told. I plan on visiting Greek myself on my next long trip, hence the research I'm doing now about Schengen.

>> has anyone got a clue what the Netherlands' authorities have to say about an overstay of lets say, 20 days?
and - should i decide not to overstay - if i visit the Netherlands for say, 85 days, quit for a week and then fly back in (playing dumb and all): what would the Dutch reaction to that be? would there be one at all?

cheers,
mike >>

[ Edit: Edited at Nov 19, 2006 4:11 AM by michab ]

30. Posted by jart (Budding Member 2 posts) 9y

I have a slightly different visa-overstay problem. I'm a US citizen with a one-year scientific visa in France. I have now been in Paris for 3 months and 2 weeks and I have just discovered that I should have applied for a "carte de sejour" during the first 3 months I was here. Since I am overdue by two weeks, should I throw myself at the mercy of the French visa authorities or should I keep quiet? I plan to travel to some other EU countries during the next 9 months.

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