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Fingerprinting to enter US

Travel Forums General Talk Fingerprinting to enter US

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61. Posted by Windmill (Full Member 125 posts) 10y

Quoting Isadora

Quoting Windmill

Of course there are going to be disagreements, but surely that's what we want? Well formed debate. There is something to learn from everyone, whether they be a good person or a bad person. I say leave the posts up as long as they are not bickering between folk.

Wow, I take time out to watch a movie and get a good night's sleep and "wham, bam, thank you ma'am" comes to mind.

What did you mean by that? Wham bam thank you ma'am?

62. Posted by MerB (Full Member 147 posts) 10y

Quoting Belize Me

It might not be an excuse but I would bet a dollar to a donut that it is one of the reasons that they are doing it. If passports and other paper id's are being counterfeited, how else can they prove that you are who you say you are? I'm not saying they are right....just asking a question.

Belize me

There will always be some things slipping through the cracks - in any natural system. But that precentage will be small enough for it not to upset the overall order of things. The only foolproof system is the one that allows for no movement at all.

63. Posted by Belize Me (Full Member 137 posts) 10y

Quoting Sander

Even with databases, fingerprints systems are rather unreliable with establishing identity. Many types of construction workers have such calluses on their fingertips that they basically have "blank" fingerprints, and faking fingerprints well enough to fool most detectors is quite easy as well.

What about retina/iris scans? Can they be faked also?

Belize Me

64. Posted by Belize Me (Full Member 137 posts) 10y

Quoting MerB

There will always be some things slipping through the cracks - in any natural system. But that precentage will be small enough for it not to upset the overall order of things. The only foolproof system is the one that allows for no movement at all.

I suppose you are right. People with no record at all could feasibly be recruited to commit a terrorist act and go undetected. Scary.

"It's a strange, strange world we live in Master Jack".

Belize Me

65. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 10y

Quoting Windmill

Quoting Isadora

Quoting Windmill

Of course there are going to be disagreements, but surely that's what we want? Well formed debate. There is something to learn from everyone, whether they be a good person or a bad person. I say leave the posts up as long as they are not bickering between folk.

Wow, I take time out to watch a movie and get a good night's sleep and "wham, bam, thank you ma'am" comes to mind.

What did you mean by that? Wham bam thank you ma'am?

Peet - my apologies for making it look as though my comment was aimed at you. It was not. You have conducted your arguements with thought and with consideration of others. Since I have subscribed to this thread, and am Moderator of this forum, I was a bit surprised how quickly things turned from debate to name-calling - which, again, is something you have not done! I should not have quoted you, then made my comment, as it was misconstrued.

Isa now returns this thread to it's regularly scheduled topic.

66. Posted by DocNY (Respected Member 403 posts) 10y

I've been fingerprinted to enter other countries and I guess I don't think it's really a big deal. I figure I'm not there to commit any crimes or to do anything wrong but there are people who do go abroad with bad intentions so I can understand the desire for security.

The new US passports and if the rumors are true traveler id cards are both supposed to have embedded biometric data and might even require fingerprint and retinal scans too.

overkill most likely but I guess if it stops a killer or rapist from entering your home country it might be worthwhile.

I think it's a grin and bear it kind of thing but it does seem rather Orwellian.

67. Posted by james (Travel Guru 4136 posts) 10y

Quoting Belize Me

Quoting Sander

Even with databases, fingerprints systems are rather unreliable with establishing identity. Many types of construction workers have such calluses on their fingertips that they basically have "blank" fingerprints, and faking fingerprints well enough to fool most detectors is quite easy as well.

What about retina/iris scans? Can they be faked also?

Belize Me

I do belize you

68. Posted by zzyzx (Budding Member 16 posts) 10y

Many types of construction workers have such calluses on their fingertips that they basically have "blank" fingerprints, and faking fingerprints well enough to fool most detectors is quite easy as well.

Gosh, Sander. That type of subterfuge doesn't seem easy to me at all! :)

But your point is well taken - it's an imperfect technology. We use fingerscanning at work, for our Pyxis medication dispensing machines, and frustration abounds. If your finger's too dry, it won't read properly; if it's covered with something (like the alcohol-based handwash we use), it won't read properly. One of my co-workers suffers from lymphedema and has periodic problems with her right arm and hand swelling up - when it does, her fingerprint grooves are distorted and won't read properly. It's this last fact that seems most salient in terms of fingerscan accuracy at airports - how many people have problems with swollen hands or feet after a long flight? I know it's a problem for me, at least.

On a (hopefully) lighter note, I was surprised to learn recently that DisneyWorld in Orlando, Florida uses fingerscanning to verify ticket authenticity. (I've not been there, so if this is inaccurate, my apologies.) If it's true, it's not Big Brother we have to worry about.

It's actually...Donald Duck. :)

69. Posted by Cupcake (Travel Guru 8468 posts) 10y

When I moved here to Arizona, I opened a bank account. But as luck would have it, one day I had to go to a bank that was not my own. I had to be finger-printed and the check I cashed had to have my finger print on it. I had never had that happen to me before. (to cash a check) Like I said, I have been finger printed for various jobs, and the two times I was arrested, so I already know my prints are out there somewhere...so it really doesn't bother me.

70. Posted by Peter P. (Budding Member 35 posts) 10y

I think we finally have to admit that our world is becoming increasingly paranoid and that these measures will continue to escalate over time. The airline industry will probably always lead the way in terms of increasing security, but it's also happening on other forms of transport.
The real question is, can we trust that whatever proofs we give will be secure from people who would take advantage of others' identities? Will all this security only lead to us becoming MORE vulnerable?