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Canadian and American accents

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11. Posted by mtlgal (Full Member 1179 posts) 10y

I find that, in general, Americans speak with more exaggerated vowels. But this is not always true. I'm *usually* able to tell wether someone's Canadian or American, but not always. If we take away the very obvious accents, such as Newfoundland or Southern American, the rest of the accents are really more similar than different, in my opinion. I'm not an expert on this topic, but I have lived in both countries and I'm a speech pathologist, so I'm very used to analyzing speech productions.

12. Posted by TeflonCDN (Full Member 123 posts) 10y

My post was not meant as a comment against the British or the Americans... It is just a comment on how the French from France feel their language is "superior" to the french spoken in Quebec.

13. Posted by moutallica (Respected Member 122 posts) 10y

For the most part, they are very similar. However, I can usually tell a Canadian from an Americen (of course, sometimes i'm wrong).

And i'm really not sure where the whole about/aboot thing came from. I've never actually met a Canadian that says it 'aboot'. I'm sure that some dialects (maritimes?) would say it like that, but it's sure not the majority of us.

14. Posted by karazyal (Travel Guru 1586 posts) 10y

Quoting mat44

i have to ask this... From an Australian point of view Canadians and Americans have very similar accents and most Australian's can't tell them apart. Is this the case with Americans and Canadians or is their a fairly big difference in the to accents?

I would think that the two countries could very easily reconize a fellow citizen.

From an American point of view, most Americans would say that Australians and Brits sound exactly alike!

There is some differences in how particular words sound in Canada if you are from Quebec, Nova Scotia or in the Vancouver area. Same, same for Boston Yankees and Texans - same words with different accents.

When someone from Nova Scotia comes down to my town and starts talking "aboot samtheeng" we notice.

15. Posted by Clarabell (Travel Guru 1696 posts) 10y

quoting karazyal
From an American point of view, most Americans would say that Australians and Brits sound exactly alike!

Sorry, but what does a "Brit" sound like? I know I'm used to it cos I live in Britain, but surely someone from London sounds nothing like someone from Cardiff or Newcastle or Edinburgh or Belfast. Therefore there's absolutly no such thing as a British accent.

If you meant English accents, a London accent is closer to the Australian one, and I can understnd the confusion if you're not used to it. But to me a Scottish acccent is as different from a southern England accent as a North American accent.

I can tell Aussies and Kiwis apart now (in NZ they eat fush and chups in the kutchen), but I never know with Americans and Canadians! It always surprised me that they themselves can't always tell!!!

16. Posted by john7buck (Respected Member 458 posts) 10y

Clarabell, the "Brits" are tough for us Yanks, mainly because as you said, for a relatively small landmass, your accents can be totally different depending on where you are from. By example, I've heard that accents can vary from town to town. Clearly, someone from Swansea sounds much different than someone from say, Liverpool. More to the point, I'm assuming the Swansea accent sounds different to Cardiff and Liverpool sounds different to Leeds and so on.

I'm from Colorado and I don't think anybody would be able to separate my accent from Wyoming, Kanasas, New Mexico, Arizona, Oregon, Washington, etc. That said, it's very different from the Southern US, New York, Chicago and the Northeast. Even California, to me, has a distinct "laid-back" accent.

To me, Canadian vs American accents are fairly easy to discern. I watch a lot of hockey and during the interviews I can almost always tell if they're from Canada or the States. But as Isa mentioned, it gets difficult because Minnesota and North Dakota (two hockey states) sound very Canadian. I went to college in Minnesota and I still say "mone-tan" sometimes instead of "mown-tain".

Like you can ask an Aussie and a Kiwi to say "fish and chips" and get a good idea, I do think "about" is a pretty good indication with us. "A-boot" is an exageration though. I think "a-boat" is more like it, whereas Americans will almost always say "a-bowt".

17. Posted by Trupioneer (Budding Member 35 posts) 10y

Us Canadians speak slower and have softer pronunciation.

18. Posted by mat44 (Full Member 58 posts) 10y

I suppose other countries always think of Californian accents as the average American accents because of Hollywood being there and shows like The OC etc. They arent as axagerated as other accents. Shows like King of the hill give you a good idea of what Texans sound like and how different the two are, then you throw in alabama, missisipi and all those and you have a few variations.

19. Posted by karazyal (Travel Guru 1586 posts) 10y

Quoting Clarabell

quoting karazyal
From an American point of view, most Americans would say that Australians and Brits sound exactly alike!

Sorry, but what does a "Brit" sound like? I know I'm used to it cos I live in Britain, but surely someone from London sounds nothing like someone from Cardiff or Newcastle or Edinburgh or Belfast. Therefore there's absolutly no such thing as a British accent.

If you meant English accents, a London accent is closer to the Australian one, and I can understnd the confusion if you're not used to it. But to me a Scottish acccent is as different from a southern England accent as a North American accent.

I can tell Aussies and Kiwis apart now (in NZ they eat fush and chups in the kutchen), but I never know with Americans and Canadians! It always surprised me that they themselves can't always tell!!!

I can usually tell the difference from a Brit speaking and an Australian speaking but most Americans probably won't tell them apart. A Scottish accent is more recognizable to Americans because of the many TV shows or movies with actors speaking; like the Star Trek "beam me up Scottie" actor."

The English accent we recognize a lot is the "stuckup sounding - pompous ass" type voice portrayed in some TV shows like "Are You Being Served" or "Masterpiece Theater" or on "BBC World News," or even "Monty Python."

20. Posted by Cupcake (Travel Guru 8468 posts) 10y

Quoting Belize Me

If you hear someone say 'eh' (pronounced like a long a as in lake) at the end of almost every sentence, chances are they're Canadian

Or from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan! :)
Our bumper stickers even say "Say yah to da U.P. eh?!"