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europe vacation opinion for me, husband, and his parents

Travel Forums Europe europe vacation opinion for me, husband, and his parents

1. Posted by wwgtown (Budding Member 3 posts) 10y

My husband and I are planning a vacation for us and his parents. We want to take them some different places in Europe. None of us have been before and we would like to let them see as much as possible, but not feel too rushed the whole trip. We have 7 days next summer to go. Where would you suggest going? I'd like to go to at least 3 places. I've always wanted to go somewhere in Italy, and maybe france. Should we buy some sort of book to help us? We are pretty much at a loss. HELP!

2. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 10y

Seven days, that's an awfully short time to see smt of europe, esp. if you first have to overcome a jetlag :-)

Depending on his parents' mobility and on how well they can stand the heat, I'd recommend to stay in Italy. My grandmother, who is in her nineties, still goes there often, so your parents-in-law should be fine. The scenery is beautiful, so also moving from one place to the next will be a treat.

You might consider first staying in Tuscany for a bit, for instance Siena. Not Florence, that's WAY too crowded in summer (Siena is bad enough already). From there, you can make daytrips to other cities; any guidebook on Italy will give a decent overview.

Then, even though summer is not the best season to go, you should absolutely spend three days or so in Rome. There's SO much to be seen there, and the trip down from Tuscany is very agreeable, either by car or by train.

I think that something like the above is pretty much all you can do in a week; if you're very ambitious, you could consider flying in to Milan, and somehow travel to Tuscany via Venice. But that would not be very realistic.

have fun, contact me for other alternatives,
Niels (Amsterdam)

[ Edit: Edited at Jun 8, 2006 1:06 AM by bentivogli ]

3. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 10y

I have to agree - 7 days is way too short to visit 2 places, let alone 3. You'll feel like all you're doing is travelling. We just spent two weeks in Italy and visited four regions that were all within driving distance - and it was just barely long enough in each place.

I'd stick with Niels' suggestion that you pick one place and do day trips from there. Tuscany is beautiful, and I fell in love with the Amalfi coast, too. Then again, you can spend the whole week in Paris, as there are so very many places to see there. It's also an excellent city for getting around on foot and public transportation. There are tons of guidebooks out there, no matter where you want to visit. Our local travel-book store has big, comfy chairs, and people will pick out a pile of books about different places and browse through them to get ideas. That might be a start for you!

4. Posted by wwgtown (Budding Member 3 posts) 10y

Thanks for the replies...my husband is now saying he wants to go to Ireland over Italy. I would prefer Italy I think. Which would be better for the four of us? By the way, his parents are very mobile. They are in their late 60's but in awesome shape.

5. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 10y

Depends on where you live. In Ireland the temperature rarely rises above the 70 F, maybe hitting 80 F on a very good and rare day. So for sombody from the desert states or Southern Florida this will be a nice change. But if you are from Cape Cod or Seattle, you'll enjoy the weather in Italy much more. It is so warn and so sunny.

Also consider that in Ireland people speak English. It sort of takes the fun out of travelling all the way to Europe only to run into people who speak the same language as at home. YMMV.

You could also compromise and meet in the middle (destination-wise) and go to Paris together.

BTW, can't you free yourself for a longer time? If you are going all the way, you might as well make it count by staying longer.

6. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 10y

Ireland and Italy are both extremely different and extremely wonderful in their own way. Ireland is cool, rainy, dark - and the people are warm, friendly, and have a very 'down-home' feel. The countryside is as green as green gets, and the food is hearty and filling. Italy is sunny, hot, and - in big cities - busy beyond belief. The people are passionate and the scenery changes with every region, and the food is wonderful.

It really depends on what you want to see and do.