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Are there destinations that you would not go to, and why?

Travel Forums General Talk Are there destinations that you would not go to, and why?

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21. Posted by zanif (Full Member 113 posts) 10y

i think i would give east timor and iraq a miss, for now at least.

the last time i went to the USA was back in 1988 when i was oh so cute (still is) 9 years old. and americans i thought were really nice people. i'm going back to USA next year, and i don't know what to expect. i hope there's no problem at the airport and hotel that's all. great expectations or wishful thinking?

22. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 10y

Quoting rhotchkiss

Quoting t_maia

Any place heavy on Christian worship would also send me away screaming, I guess. Southern and Midwest USA for longer than a month in a small town with mandatory bible service on sunday - NO THANKS!

Oh, man, does this make my heart sink. ...
It just makes me sad that many foreigners think we are all like this. Not that I can blame you when people like my grandmother say, "Well, I just hope they speak a lot of English there!" - that would be her reponse when I told her I was moving to Switzerland.

Well, I did make the qualifications "for more than a month" and "small town" and "southern and midwest" because I know that SF and NYC aren't like that at all. What annoys me most about these places is the way Christian faith is taken for granted - either you are a Christian or you are a bad person. There are other places like this elsewhere (some traditional villages in Switzerland and South West Germany) but in these areas in the USA you are least likely to escape it due to the size of the country.

You should have also heard my grandfather when I told him I would go to the USA for 3 months. He fought in WW II and became a POW of the USA in April 1945. That close to surrender the US Army didn't have the resources to deal with so many prisoners all at once, so many German soldiers were left for months to starve and freeze in the drizzling spring rain at makeshift encampments that were little more than wire fences with guards. Nobody registered them in any way, it was as if they didn't exist. A lot of prisoners died from exposure, starvation and from being buried in the ground holes they had dug for shelter when they collapsed from the rain. Needless to say he had some choice words about the USA in general and its people in particular.

@ zanif

Hey, what do you think about going to Israel? Would it be worth to you the trouble of "loosing" your passport in Europe after your visit to Israel and getting a new one at a European embassy just so that your home coutry will let you back in?

[ Edit: Edited at Jun 28, 2006 1:54 PM by t_maia ]

23. Posted by rhotchkiss (Budding Member 22 posts) 10y

T_maia-

When I said all, I meant all people in the South and Midwest, like you mentioned. It's well-known that there are different sorts of people in NYC and out west with different opinions on things, and most assume that Southerners and Midwesterners are the most religious and closeminded. You will find both good and bad people everywhere you go, no?

I was raised in a Christian household, like most people I know, but I haven't followed it as an adult. (For now, I'm into Daoism from a philosophical standpoint, but that could very well change. I've also attended a Unitarian Universalist church several times out of curiosity.) I definitely do not judge good and bad based on religion (though I know tons of people who do, ugh). In fact, I have had many "bad" experiences with so-called Christians and I'd bet that I'm as cynical about them as you are.

But - I'm not the norm for where I was raised. ie: I'm a Democrat smack in the middle of a red state. I consider myself an openminded person, and I hope to continue to be more so.

Sorry to confuse you...

24. Posted by Hookey (Budding Member 22 posts) 10y

Quoting t_maia

Well, I did make the qualifications "for more than a month" and "small town" and "southern and midwest" because I know that SF and NYC aren't like that at all. What annoys me most about these places is the way Christian faith is taken for granted - either you are a Christian or you are a bad person.

I'd agree there's an assumption that if you're white and western you're a Christian. I remember on a work trip to Ohio someone asking me in a matter of fact way which church I went to. As an Englishman it was such an unusual question to be asked that I actually laughed for a moment before I realised the guy was asking a serious question. Having said that, if he thought I was a 'bad person' he didn't show it; maybe he prayed for me later :)

Quoting t_maia

You should have also heard my grandfather when I told him I would go to the USA for 3 months. He fought in WW II and became a POW of the USA in April 1945. That close to surrender the US Army didn't have the resources to deal with so many prisoners all at once, so many German soldiers were left for months to starve and freeze in the drizzling spring rain at makeshift encampments that were little more than wire fences with guards. Nobody registered them in any way, it was as if they didn't exist. A lot of prisoners died from exposure, starvation and from being buried in the ground holes they had dug for shelter when they collapsed from the rain. Needless to say he had some choice words about the USA in general and its people in particular.

Could have been worse, it could have been the Russians. My ex-girlfriend's granddad didn't get back to Germany until 1952, by which time his wife (who thought he was dead,) had married an Englishman. You can't really judge any country based on wartime experiences...

25. Posted by snatterand (Travel Guru 454 posts) 10y

This discussion has taken an interesting turn - now it's all about religion!
As a Swede, I'm hardly religious at all. I am a member of the Swedish Church, but it doesn't mean more to me than that I will get a "discount" for my wedding (if I'll ever get married, that is) and my funeral (morbid, I know, but it's the truth). My grandpa (whom I've never met because he died before I was born) was jewish, so I've been taking part in both christian and jewish traditions for Chanuka, Christmas, Easter, etc. Also, I think Buddhism makes a lot of sense. But that's about how religious I am.

However, I think it's interesting and part of the fun to see and experience different religious beliefs while travelling. Unless it's getting too much and is made into an excuse for war or oppression of women.

//Susanna

26. Posted by rach8645 (Inactive 62 posts) 10y

Okay not too sure why we're on religion but have to get my say in this one...

Hands up who would go to the Middle East now? Okay … cant see your hands but assume not many. BUT that doesn’t mean we don’t wanna see the country! Its unfair to put everyone in the same boat I mean I’m English – educated Church of England but choose now to follow. I am happy to visit China, India, Thailand, Italy America and not follow their religions but understand and respect it.

I think its a shame that we’re fed [email protected] about extreme peoples interpretations of all religions not just Middle Eastern ones. I mean why cant there be any positive TV coverage of the proper side to these religions? I was lucky enough to be educated in a lot of them at school and its helped heaps traveling because I know that the majority of religions and their followers are peaceful and they get stereotyped by association which is not really fair!

I have a stupidly open mind with religion, which may be fickle, but I find it works traveling and I would never want to go to a country and not embrace its culture and that means its religion too.

I think you don’t have to agree with it – just respect that some people do and its not that they’re better or worse. They have just found a way to deal with the sh!t that gets chucked at us through life.

Wow I got all serious! Let me lighten the mood again...

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