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1. Posted by grhi (Budding Member 20 posts) 10y

Hello,

I am attempting to try and make a reservation on the Italian train lines from Rome (actually Civitavecchia) to Venice (Tutte Le Stazioni) at:

http://www.trenitalia.com

But I need some help. The site references several different train types:

ES-Eurostar,
IC Plus,
ICN-Intercity Notte,
E-Espresso,
EN-Espresso Notte,
R-Regionale,
IR-Interregionale

What are the differences between these types?

The site also gives me the ability to "choose your position" which shows (I think) six seats that can be selected. Two pairs are shown directly facing each other (total 4 seats) and then there are two single seats directly facing each other (total 2 seats), what does this mean??

Finally, does anyone know if the tickets purchased may be used on another train other than the one originally purchased for? (If we miss the train we originally booked, can we use the tickets on a later train to get to the same destination?)

Thanks!!

2. Posted by zoooom (Budding Member 2 posts) 10y

I just came back from europe tour and first of all its totally worth it. We travelled in ES from Rome to Milan and from Milan to Lucerne...ES is the fastest mode of rail transport. Also you might want to buy a pass instead of ticket just in case you cannot catch the train in time. You can also make reservations for the pass you bought ($11 per person approx.)....In any case you would be better off buying tickets on station since there is always seating available in the trains....
Also the seating numbers are kinda skewed in these trains...the seats are generally in a group of 4 with 2 in each row facing each other.

3. Posted by myo (Budding Member 29 posts) 10y

Hey Grhi,

It's true there are a lot of types of trains in Italy, and it can be quite confusing to know what is exactly the difference. I've found that the major difference is speed and price.
- The eurostar is a high velocity train, but is quite expensive. It also requires reservation.
- The IC is very fast too, but cheaper. It's an "intercity train", so it takes you from one major city to the next, without many stops along the way.
- "Notte" means night, so the ICN and EN are night trains.
- I don't really know what makes Espresso trains special, and I can't find it on the website either.

A lot of this can also be found on the Trenitalia site

So, it depends on your budget : if you're on a tight budget, you'll want to take the regional and local trains (which are really cheap, I think), but you'll be spending more time on the train than when you take the more expensive but very fast Eurostar.
Oh yes, the way to find out what the difference in price is, is to try it out on the website : you'll probably find several possibilities for your trip between 2 cities, with different trains. Just click on "buy" behind the possibilities and it will give you the possibility to calculate the price without having to purchase the ticket.

As for your 2 other questions, I'm not really sure, maybe someone else on this forum knows.

4. Posted by grhi (Budding Member 20 posts) 10y

Thank you, this is very helpful!!

5. Posted by aliyoung99 (Budding Member 56 posts) 10y

Hi,

I travelled by train through Italy and i highly recommend the intercity trains. I took one train from Milan to the south coast which was a regionalesque one! - after three stops it was so full that i had to stand for five hours before a seat came free. I also found out to my horror that i almost had to pay an inter rail pass subsidy of almost full fare!
If you can afford the more expensive ones then go for it.. well worth the money.

6. Posted by myo (Budding Member 29 posts) 10y

You're welcome !:)

It's true that the trains can get crowded, but it generally depends on the moment (I've experienced that afternoon trains are less crowded, but maybe that was just luck.) And off course, it depends on it being in high season or not: August is the holiday month for most Italians, so trains can get more crowded.

7. Posted by Brit81 (Inactive 2 posts) 10y

This sounds very stupid... but I will be purchasing a Eurailpass for 15 days in 2 months (Flexipass). Anyway, I will be traveling through Italy and need to know which train pertains to my pass. Thanks for the help!

8. Posted by amanecer (Respected Member 203 posts) 10y

Quoting grhi

Hello,

But I need some help. The site references several different train types:

ES-Eurostar,
IC Plus,
ICN-Intercity Notte,
E-Espresso,
EN-Espresso Notte,
R-Regionale,
IR-Interregionale

What are the differences between these types?

The site also gives me the ability to "choose your position" which shows (I think) six seats that can be selected. Two pairs are shown directly facing each other (total 4 seats) and then there are two single seats directly facing each other (total 2 seats), what does this mean??

Finally, does anyone know if the tickets purchased may be used on another train other than the one originally purchased for? (If we miss the train we originally booked, can we use the tickets on a later train to get to the same destination?)

Thanks!!

ES-Eurostar, fastest, most expensive, stops only in main stations. reservation is mandatory.you must pay an extra supplement for this train
IC Plus,fast , stops in more stations than ES. You pay an extra supplement, but cheaper than ES. if the train route is long (f. e. milan-reggio calabria, milan naples, ventimiglia(border Italy france/)-rome and so on)is probably delayed.(anyone knows why:(
) reservation is facultative, [You can get in train also if it's very crowded (at your risk:) ], but it's advisable on long routes, especially to south during summer.Some particular IC trains have reservation mandatory (f.e. Cisalpino).
ICN-Intercity Notte, the same as above, travels during night, usually covers long routes
E-Espresso, fast, runs across long distances. You don't have to reserve nor to pay extra supplement (except in the case you want to sleep in bunk during travel-see below)
EN-Espresso Notte, the same as above, runs during night
R-Regionale, the slowest trains, runs inside a region and stops basically in every station. useful to visit little towns, but sometimes the station is far from the town centre, and not connected; and sometimes the station refers to 2 towns (f. e. poggibonsi/s.gimignano): one is most famous, and the other is the town where the train stops. guess in which ones you actually get off the train could be hard.
IR-Interregionale the same as as above, covers a route among 2 or more regions, so it is usually a little bit faster than regional and stops in less stations. reservation in regional and interregional trains is not possible, but delays are less frequent . (as well as the good functioning of air conditioned).

if you buy an ES ticket you can take an IC without any problem (if there are seats available).I don'tknow if you have to change ticket anyway, but without expenses if you change before a certain time, f.e. 2 hours before your lost train departure.

if you have an IC ticket you can take an ES train paying a supplement (if there're seats available). I'm not sure you can do that directly on the train, or if you have to change ticket at the desk in any case.(rules have changed recently).
changing tickets means probably a long queue at the desk..

tickets for IR, R or express trains without extra supplement can be used in every train of this categories without any problem.

seats: if there are seats available you can select if you prefer to seat close to the window or to the corridor..ES trains have 4 seats (2 opposite to 2)on the left hand side of the train and
2 seats on the right hand side, one opposite to the othe other.
IC trains can have coaches with closed cabins for 6 people, or seats in coaches without cabins.

In Italy smoking is forbidden on board, as well as in public places (cafes, restaurants..)

ticket must be stamped before starting the journey, return tickets must be stamped twice, both when you you go and when you come back.

hope it can be helpful!

9. Posted by grhi (Budding Member 20 posts) 10y

Yes, that does help some more.

Thank you!

10. Posted by Gillis (Budding Member 8 posts) 10y

This may not suit everyone, but this is my two cents' worth:

I go to Italy every year, so I've pretty much had my fill of the "charming experience" of traveling by train there. I love Italy and adore the Italians (I'm Italian, too), but I KNOW train travel in Italy can be a harrowing experience if you don't set yourself up properly.

NOW whenever I go, if I'm going to be on a train for any longer than one hour -- ESPECIALLY if I'm hauling some serious luggage -- I always, ALWAYS shell out the extra couple of Euros and get a RESERVED seat in SECOND Class. (First Class is a ridiculous waste of money if you're a tourist on a budget.)

This means I get to SIT DOWN, no matter what happens; and I don't have to leave my luggage 30 yards away somewhere, because there was no room for a human to STAND anywhere near it. (if you end up having to stand in a crowded train, odds are the aisles will already be full of luggage and bodies, so there is no guarantee that you will find space for both you AND your luggage in the same area)

If your trip will be a short one, and you can easily handle the luggage you've got, go for it and pay the minimum -- standing in the aisle and leaning out the window, admiring the breathtaking view of the land and sea, is a pretty good way to spend an hour; otherwise, for a handful of Euros more, you can ensure that you won't leave Italy with no memories at all but that one lousy experience you had standing up for six hours on a train, where you spent the whole time praying that you wouldn't pass out and lose your luggage while you were unconscious.