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Travel Forums General Talk Shunned

1. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 10y

We were starting to discuss this in another thread, but:

Do you feel that travellers of certain nationalities are more open to communicating with non-countrymen than others?

The politically correct answer would obviously be "no", and I'd hate to provoke any kind of xenofobic response here, but my own experiences are amazingly stable in this respect. Germans and Brazilians, for instance (or at least, most if not all Germans and Brazilians I ever met) are very open to exchanging experiences and communicating with other travellers, while Isrealis (or at least, most if not all Israelis I ever met) seem to prefer hanging out among themselves and not mingle with other nationalities at all. A supporting tendency that seems to correlate with this is group size: I meet single travellers from Germany and Brazil all the time, while I cannot recall ever having met an Israeli travelling solo...

Anyone has similar or opposite experiences?

2. Posted by aleah (Full Member 400 posts) 10y

Why do Italians and French always travel in groups?? This is about the same thing.

The Israeli I've met were mostly travelling alone, and they were always really fun to travel with!

I think, travelling in groups (no matter what nationality) is different. I guess it's the same as if you go out with with a bunch of friends or one good friend...it leads to different views/experiences. As for the group travelling the group feeling and the group dynamics are more important, whereas travelling alone it's more important to be on your own, independant and maybe even more selfish.

(have you ever seen pictures of Mallorca...not ALL Germans do like to travel alone )

[ Edit: Edited at Aug 25, 2006 2:31 AM by aleah ]

3. Posted by Utrecht (Moderator 5596 posts) 10y

I have the same experience with Germans (less with brazilians because I only met a few) but not the same with Israeli's. I've met some alone, some in small groups and most of them were ok, but not really open. And bigger groups are awful to say the least. But that's the same with italians, even if they are alone.
Positive also about the canadians and australian people and with scandinavian people.

4. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 10y

That question (and those like it) can only be answered with a sweeping generalisation - and I'm afraid those xenophobic tendencies seem to come to the fore. I'm guessing that people from different nationalities/language groups etc sometimes bunch together a bit because it is easier for them to communicate with and understand each other, which can seem particularly attractive when you're a long way from home.

5. Posted by summer910 (Respected Member 1342 posts) 10y

Quoting magykal1

I'm guessing that people from different nationalities/language groups etc sometimes bunch together a bit because it is easier for them to communicate with and understand each other, which can seem particularly attractive when you're a long way from home.

Yes, I'm sure that definitely factors in when you're away from home, that you'd be attracted to having something familiar as a reminder of home.

That said, I travelled with a group of Koreans on a work junket (other nationalities included in a group of 20-30 people). While the rest of us had a great time getting to know one another, the Korean group of five bunched together and were generally unresponsive to attempts to chat. I suppose it's the language barrier holding them back, but they did give out some rather funny vibes.

6. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 10y

We just came back from a 1-week all-inclusive in Cuba, and noticed that not only did all the Canadians (mostly from Toronto, for some reason) hang out together - they even grouped themselves into "cool" and "non-cool" clans. It was odd - like being back in high school. I enjoy meeting my fellow countrymen, but the last thing I wanted to do was hang out with them for a week.