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11. Posted by Taffski (Travel Guru 182 posts) 10y

In the UAE if the official temperature goes over 50 degrees centigrade then no one has to work outside.
I remember being sat in the car listening to the radio. The temperature guage said 54 C, it was about 95% humidity.
Suddenly on the radio came the official temperature for the day 49.5 C :)

We also got caught up in Cyclone Ivy in NZ a few years back and also drove right into the middle of a storm in Queensland. Lightening was shooting down all around us and we actually saw a tree get hit and set alight by the flames....
I thought God was about to start talking to me... but he didn't!
:)

Taffski.

12. Posted by grasshoppa (Full Member 202 posts) 10y

during the Australian open in Melbourne it can reach temperatures of 45 degrees celcius up in the red center it can get up into the 50's

13. Posted by marlis (Travel Guru 1167 posts) 10y

hi cruisegirl,
300foot Sailboat?
Have you been sailing on one of this Windjammer Boats?

I crossed together with my partner and two friends on a 33 foot Sailyacht the Atlantik from Gran Canaria to Tobago.We waited till the storm was over...thanks god!
We found a demasted Yacht(from Canada) drifting,no people abord(we tried to tow it,but it became dangerous for us so we had to abort the action.
Two days later I spottet a tiny red spot at the horizont,convinced the crew that I 'm sure about.
as the red spot finaly becam bigger between the waves we where schocked.It was a liferaft!
One Person,skinny and half out of his mind was with a little pot in his Hand was waving at us.He was on a French yacht who was also hit by the same storm.The Captain had died of dehydration and the young Crewmember could stand it anymor,so he took the liferaft.
In total he was shipwracked 53 days.We had him 10 days till we aproched Tobago.
The canadian yacht driftet over the Atlantic and was found by a Fisherman from Venezuela,the french yacht was found and picked up by a polish freighter und brought to Curacao.
We where relly happy that we had waited till the storm had passed.

Marlis

14. Posted by cruisegirl (Respected Member 244 posts) 10y

Close, was sailing on WindStar Cruise Lines.

We were lucky that we were crossing without passengers, doing a wet dock, and I am even more fortunate that I don't get sea sick.

I have a huge respect for Mother Nature and what she can do to vessels out in the ocean. It's terrifying. One of my other ships, the NCL Dawn, was hit with a huge wave a couple years ago, it blew out the front windows and flooded Deck 10.

15. Posted by marlis (Travel Guru 1167 posts) 10y

yes it can be very scary out at sea,when you can't turn around or hide somewhere.
I got nightmares after some really black nights,not one star to see only the strange sounds of the see.
Since we did not had a autopilot or windsteering we had our shifts,during the 3 hours, at night 2 houres.
Will never forget the beautyful sunrises and sunsets ,or the many falling stars at night,the dolphins who gave us company.

Marlis

16. Posted by snatterand (Travel Guru 454 posts) 10y

I was up in Tärnaby (far, far north in Sweden) snowboarding during New Year's a couple of years ago. One morning the temperature was about -50 degrees Celsius. We could only do like two or three runs before we had to go indoors to defrost. The morning after the thermometer showed -5 degrees Celsius. It felt incredibly hot!

//Susanna

17. Posted by daveh (Travel Guru 1027 posts) 10y

Maybe you should look up a guy called ?Nick Middleton?. He presented a travel program (with a follow up book) where he visited the wettest, coldest, hottest, etc places on earth. Very interesting program (maybe called Going to Extremes). I think he may have more than 1 book on this subject.

18. Posted by Utrecht (Moderator 5596 posts) 10y

Quoting daveh

Maybe you should look up a guy called ?Nick Middleton?. He presented a travel program (with a follow up book) where he visited the wettest, coldest, hottest, etc places on earth. Very interesting program (maybe called Going to Extremes). I think he may have more than 1 book on this subject.

I saw his documentaries on the tv, it was great. He went to siberia (coldest place...ojmjakon, -70!), to India (monsoon), to Ehtiopia (danakil depression, average year temperature 34 degrees!) and to the driest place (some village in the atacama desert, even drier than Arica, Chile).

19. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 10y

The coldest Ive ever been at was -32 celsius in North America. It went to the bone and it was too miserable to really enjoying any skiing.

The hottest Ive been at was 42 degrees, again in North America. Seriously roasting! All my bodily processes shut down and I sat by a tree sweating buckets and making little distressed sounds for a whole day.

Drove alongside a spectacular thunder and lightning storm high on the Bolivian altiplano. Great forks of lightning just bolted out of the clouds alongside our jeep as we raced at top speed away from it! Excellent.

20. Posted by numero1 (Respected Member 295 posts) 10y

Quoting Taffski

We also got caught up in Cyclone Ivy in NZ a few years back and also drove right into the middle of a storm in Queensland.

Quite strange considering NZ is out of the cyclone belt.

Unles it was not a tropical cyclone, but one that pushed up from the Antarctic, but then again, I never knew they gave those intense low pressure systems which blast northward from antartica names.

I don't recall a cyclone Ivy ever hitting NZ, but I could be wrong.

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