Skip Navigation

Moral Dilemmas

Travel Forums Off Topic Moral Dilemmas

Page
  • 1
  • 2

Last Post

11. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 9y

Quoting Hien

D

Ah.... H.... Where's your dilemma??? Or is that your dilemma - you couldn't think of one??

12. Posted by s_hoot (Respected Member 497 posts) 9y

Hien's answer for D) is: why go to the pub when i can slack all day here and not even have to get up from my lazy boy, and I get paid for it!

13. Posted by Purdy (Travel Guru 3546 posts) 9y

In answer to the dilemma ------ head down and do as little as needed to get by then leave early for the pub!

------------------------------

Your out for a meal in a really expensive restaurant which has had really good reviews, but your meal in your view is not worth the cash you have to fork out, so do you....

1 Pay up and vow not to go back there, and spread the word to your friends that its not up to the hype and they are better of in Pizza Hut

2 Ask to speak to the manager and complain in a nice but firm way on your way out after you have paid the bill

OR

3 Kick up a fuss, demand the manger and refuse to pay the bill on the grounds of a poor meal

14. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 9y

Well if there was anything specific wrong I'd probably not pay for it, e.g. I have sent back food that has been too overcooked. However I'm probably most likely to go for 1) if it's just generally mediocre. So 1) it is.

Here's an interesting one:

A colleague at work has just won a promotion that you applied for as well. You were the only two appointable candidates. You know that they lied about their previous experience on their application, whilst you were scrupulously honest. What to do?

15. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 9y

Okay, so this isn't so much a dilemma as a rally for support in my way of thinking...

Your best friend (of 30+ years) wanted an iPod. Three years ago, you give him one for Christmas and he's happy as a little clam. The caveat was that the iPod would be both his Christmas and birthday gifts rolled into one because it was more than you would spend on each other normally. Come birthday time, you want him to get a little something so you send an iTunes gift certificate. Fast forward... After enjoying his little music-maker, he needs to redeem a gift certificate from one of his credit cards and orders an iPod Nano. His first iPod has now been shelved for several months and knowing that you really want an iPod (but you're not willing to treat yourself to one), he offers to give you the original. (The Nano is ultimately better suited for his purposes, so he says.) You accept the offer. Come December when it's time do the gifty thing again - he says "Merry Christmas, the iPod was your gift". Sorry?? You're regifting what I gave you three years ago and you returned to me two months ago?

Maybe it's just me... But I find that a bit on the (sorry, can't find the right term here) side.

16. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 9y

Quoting Isadora

Maybe it's just me... But I find that a bit on the (sorry, can't find the right term here) side.

I think 'tacky' is the word you're looking for. Your friend probably reasoned that he was giving up an expensive gift and you wanted an iPod anyway - so it works out all round. At the very least, he could have given you something to complement the regift - a certificate, an iPod cover, new earbuds. Plus Christmas gifts involve wrapping and surprise and all those things that say you actually made an effort for someone else. It's proably not a friendship-breaker, but it's most definitely very, very tacky.

17. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Quoting tway

Quoting Isadora

Maybe it's just me... But I find that a bit on the (sorry, can't find the right term here) side.

It's proably not a friendship-breaker, but it's most definitely very, very tacky.

Agree with Isadora. That is kind of an ungracious gift. (Couldn't think of a better term either). At the same time, someone who would do that would always have been exhibiting such tendencies throughout the 30+ best-friendship-years. So, as Tway says, it would not be a friendship-breaker but rather something on the lines of "so typical of so-and-so" and a laugh over it, perhaps together.;)

[ Edit: Edited on Jan 8, 2007, at 5:24 PM by Ahila ]

18. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Quoting magykal1

A colleague at work has just won a promotion that you applied for as well. You were the only two appointable candidates. You know that they lied about their previous experience on their application, whilst you were scrupulously honest. What to do?

If I also knew that the promotion review board also knew that the candidate lied about their previous experience and went ahead with the promotion irrespective of it (i.e. outright favouritism), I would lodge a formal complaint to the ombudsman or whoever deals with abuse of authority and if there was failure to take action, I would just leave that workplace.

On the other hand, if the review board was not aware of the lie, then I would evaluate my options: if my current position was good and I did have a good chance of being promoted next time around, I would stick with the job and if not, I would simply quit and move on.

------------
My dilemma for today:
Your project financed a social plus promotional event, which was hosted by a partner organization. During the social event, you feel that the partner organization is taking over the event, in the sense - hardly any mention about your project during the event, media attention drawn to their own organization and work etc. While your project actually wants to help the partner organization develop themselves, it is in the interest of your project to make known to the public its objectives and ongoing work and not be an invisible promoter.

What would you do:
(1) Confront your contact at the partner organization and request them to pay half the event bill, given the lack of publicity for your project;
(2) Talk to him/ her about how you feel about the handling of the event and ask them to at least publish a follow-up article on the local newspapers about your project;
(2) Ignore and consider it a lesson learnt for future dealings and at least the consolation that the event itself was a success, in that one of your sub-objectives of strengthening your partner organization has been achieved;

19. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Just thought of wrapping my dilemma of four days ago by stating what I ended up doing: I thought deeply about 2, but then in the end, settled for option 3.

Page
  • 1
  • 2