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what do you know about Argentina

Travel Forums Central/South America & The Caribbean what do you know about Argentina

1. Posted by milla (Full Member 18 posts) 12y

milla has indicated that this thread is about Argentina

probably very little.
For years Argentina was an expensive option. It was famous for its lands
its horses, its tango, its football, its meat, its Evita etc.
But people didnt come. Too expensive, they said.
Now that many people are coming, now that the devaluation has hit hard and the country has become an interesting and very affordable option. If you know very little of this country, ask us via this forum

2. Posted by citybell (Full Member 419 posts) 12y

Thanks for your post..Hope every traveller will benefit from your msg by knowing details/information from you. Yes Argentina has become very cheap to travel.But how about the safety?

3. Posted by milla (Full Member 18 posts) 12y

to be sincere: we, locals are having problems. no point in denying it. We were used to living a a safe country and now we are facing problems. The level of crime has gone up and no solution has been found so far. We are learning to take care where ever we go, to be on the alert, to move in populated areas, to avoid the dark places, to be attentive and to use common sense. and we tell the same to the tourists who come.
We havent had problems with tourists, so far. They feel Buenos Aires is a safe city, much safer than many others in South America. And probably it is.That is why and it is funny when they say we exagerate with the precautions we take with them. It is always better, i think.
If you do take precautions nothing happens. I ve never been robbed, nothing wrong has happened to me but i do take care.

4. Posted by SAtraveler (Budding Member 9 posts) 12y

My husband and I were in B.A. last spring and felt not only safe, but also very welcome.

Argentina's financial problems have led citizens to go about earning a living in creative ways that have added to its character as a leading world-class tourist destination. There are more street performers and street artists and tourists are important to them. In some countries economic downturns cause increases in the number of beggers to the point that you dread leaving the hotel, but not in Argentina. A few gypsies here and there were all we encountered.

Prices were great -- Argentine beef filet and a good bottle of wine was less than $10.

Our hotel was around the corner from Ave. Florida and we felt just as safe walking at night as we did in the daytime.

There have been lots of stories in the news here (Miami) about Anti-American sentiment in Latin America. This is directed toward the Bush administration and not toward the American people. I've taken many trips to South America since 9/11 and have seen the mood change from one of overwelming sadness and sympathy to "What's going on up there?" to "Bush no good." Leaving Belo Horizonte, Brazil in April the cab driver asked "Bush or Kerry?" Kerry got big thumbs up so, if you travel anywhere in Latin America, leave your Bush/Cheney t-shirt home and you'll be fine.

5. Posted by milla (Full Member 18 posts) 12y

i am glad you visited this country and enjoyed it, specially that you felt safe. Many tourist say the same, regarless the place they stayed.
Maybe we, the locals complain more or exaggerate the precautions.
Nonetheless, it is better to take care and exercise common sense as in any part of the world.

6. Posted by SAtraveler (Budding Member 9 posts) 12y

Thanks for the reply.

Locals everywhere hear and read news accounts of all the bad things that happen in their area. If you read the Miami newspaper and listened to the local news for a week, you would think it's a dangerous place. If you stay away from certain areas, its a very safe city. Visitors don't get a sense of the day-to-day problems, especially if they don't speak the language.

Have you traveled on Southern Winds? If so what's your opinion of their service and fares?

Also, if you've been to Mendoza, how many days would you suggest spending to visit a number of wineries with free tastings? Are the wineries close to Mendoza or would it be better to stay in other towns outside Mendoza?

Thanks,
Jane

7. Posted by milla (Full Member 18 posts) 12y

You put it the right way "tourist dont get a sense of the today problem", they are delighted to visit the city and this is fantastic.
But we have to tell them to take care to avoid problems.And i think this is fair.

Southern Wind is a relatively new co. apparently works very well with domestic flights though now it is crossing the frontier. The prices for tourists are the same as for locals that is why the demand is big. It is even diff for us to get tickets. Agencies get tickets well in advance.

Mendoza is an example of cleanness for the rest of the country. I was there long ago.In the Province there are 12 winneries such as Flichman, Lagardi, Weinerts Navarro Correas, Lurton, Lopez,to mention some.
If you stay in the city itself, and i recommend that, you can visit 2 which are very near the city in one morning. They immitate the way the indians Huarpes processed the grapes. The others are further.

In a weeks time you will be able to taste a really good wine and if time allows visit one of the best provinces this country has.

8. Posted by SAtraveler (Budding Member 9 posts) 12y

Thanks for the info.

We have a website (http://www.latintravel.com) that promotes travel to Latin America and features "virtual tours" of destination highlights. We plan to concentrate on Argentina in the coming year. I'm hoping to get to Mendoza and Peninsula Valdez in the coming months and would love to get down to Patagonia.

I might have more questions in the future. Thanks for your help.

9. Posted by milla (Full Member 18 posts) 12y

hope you can make again. This time Mendoza and Peninsula de Valdez
we are willing to welcome you again and hope everything in Argentina will be in a better situation by then.
dont hesitate to ask me any question in the meantime.