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Do you bring a tripod / monopod on your trips?

Travel Forums Travel Photography Do you bring a tripod / monopod on your trips?

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11. Posted by fijiphil (Budding Member 2 posts) 9y

Who says you can't photograph the Mona Lisa??

http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/France/photo394885.htm

12. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 9y

Quoting fijiphil

Who says you can't photograph the Mona Lisa??

http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/France/photo394885.htm

The Louvre says so on signs EVERYWHERE. Unless you have permission from the museum, it is quite disrespectful to their rules imo.. Just like the people who think it is OK to touch exhibits.

What's the point anyway when there's too many pictures of the thing to be believed?

That said, I've taken photos in the Hermitage without realising it wasn't allowed. It didn't take long for someone to tell me off though :)

In answer to the question about a tripod; personally I'd not take one, just because of the extra weight. After all, when I'm travelling I also like to enjoy myself and when you are walking around for 8 hours + a day with a tripod it gets VERY tiring and can seriously impact on your enjoyment. I'd make do by leaning the camera on things when trying to get a steady shot. The only thing I'd consider is one of those tiny tripods that are about 10cms in size.

Of course, the story would be entirely different if photography was the main point of the trip and I intended to earn some income off the photos.

13. Posted by Dezafinado (Respected Member 177 posts) 9y

Although I take mostly day shots, but for pix like this...

http://i1.trekearth.com/photos/59897/france.jpg

...it's hard to do w/o one.

14. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 9y

Hard, but not impossible ..

I consider it a challenge :)

15. Posted by Dezafinado (Respected Member 177 posts) 9y

great shot... you rested the camera on the window sill or balcony, right?

[ Edit: Edited on Jan 8, 2007, at 5:41 PM by Dezafinado ]

16. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 9y

Quoting fijiphil

Who says you can't photograph the Mona Lisa??

http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/Europe/France/photo394885.htm

They stopped me when I was there last Sept. That's not to say I don't have that same photograph in my collection.

17. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 9y

Quoting Dezafinado

great shot... you rested the camera on the window sill or balcony, right?

Yeah , though this one was handheld.

I'm more proud of the Moscow one, because it was on film as well, so I had no way of knowing whether it was sharp till I got home. Digital makes night time shooting so much easier because you can quickly check to see how it turned out :)

I do admit though, it is restrictive needing to find somewhere to rest a camera, etc.. It's a balance; lightness vs equipment. Personally I go for lightness.

18. Posted by Dezafinado (Respected Member 177 posts) 9y

I find digicams, especially those with smaller sensors, are more prone to shake than film. I usually could get decent sharp images with my film cameras down to 1/15 sec. With my Oly C7070 (1:1/8 sensor), 1/30 sec is my limit.

19. Posted by Makini (Respected Member 80 posts) 9y

I carry a small tripod with me - packed it's just about 40-50cm long. Fits nicely in the backpack when backpacking - and it's O so worth it ;)

20. Posted by juznholzuk (Budding Member 4 posts) 9y

As a photographer I would have to say that I would never even contemplate going away on holiday without either a monopod or tripod. Of course which you take depends entirely on what you're planning on doing. If you like the idea of including yourself in photos of a particular area then of course a tripod is what you'll need. If you're more worried about the darkness inside many European cathedrals and museums etc. then you may want to take a monopod. Many places allow photography inside, simply not utilising flash. Either a tripod or monopod will allow you to get clear, sharp images.

Good luck!
Holly