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Understaning foreign menus?

Travel Forums Asia Understaning foreign menus?

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11. Posted by oslaue (Full Member 571 posts) 9y

well since i am a local in my own city then yes i am picky in were i eat.

some of us have standards endymion, and when you have sampled the finer things in life
then you expect nothing less.

i eat in very nice places, good food, wine on side streets that normally tourists cannot find.
and when i do eat in a tourist area the food in general is very poor and expensive plus over crowded with tourists.

and the amazing part is in were i normally eat...there are never tourists! they wouldnt know any better!

Endymion - i could take your approach and go to mac donalds every day or i could sample local food!
tourist food in most countrys is to serve to cater for your needs not the local needs because your not willing
to sample local cuisine.

someone ought to burst that bubble of yours.

i dont go to countrys to sample stuff that i can get back home i go to sample stuff that i cant get back
home but then you are probably no where near as adventerous as i am.

1/10 of the size? i bet your the type that travels with got one pair of socks, boxer shorts, and t-shirt that you were for one whole month without a wash...yeah i have met those kind of people on my travels before.

[ Edit: Edited on Jan 12, 2007, at 7:08 AM by oslaue ]

12. Posted by masterblaster19 (Full Member 119 posts) 9y

Well im a pretty picky eater, so id like to know what im putting in my mouth. i hate pork, and most vegetables. and lemongrass. i fucking hate that. So ya i guess you could say im curious as to what i may be dining on. Enjoy your travels, each to their own as they say.
P.s I have travelled plenty before, just never to thailand. plus i went for a thai meal a few weeks ago with my boyfriend to see what we're going to be eating, and it was ming. just ming. I was a little disappointed, to say the least.

13. Posted by Laura_B (Respected Member 352 posts) 9y

Quoting jennygro

plus i went for a thai meal a few weeks ago with my boyfriend to see what we're going to be eating, and it was ming. just ming. I was a little disappointed, to say the least.

I never eat Thai food in the UK, it's nothing like you get in Thailand, plus it's soooooo expensive for what it is!

If you don't like lemon grass you're not going to like Thai food that much. There are dishes which don't include it though. Key thai flavouring: coriander, lemongrass, ginger, chillies, sprimp paste, fish sauce etc. can't think of any more.

14. Posted by wotthefiqh (Inactive 1447 posts) 9y

Quoting oslaue

Some of us have standards endymion, and when you have sampled the finer things in life then you expect nothing less.
I eat in very nice places, good food, wine on side streets that normally tourists cannot find.
Endymion - i could take your approach and go to mac donalds every day or i could sample local food!
tourist food in most countrys is to serve to cater for your needs not the local needs because your not willing to sample local cuisine.
Someone ought to burst that bubble of yours.
I dont go to countrys to sample stuff that i can get back home i go to sample stuff that i cant get back home but then you are probably no where near as adventerous as i am.
1/10 of the size? I bet your the type that travels with got one pair of socks, boxer shorts, and t-shirt that you were for one whole month without a wash...yeah i have met those kind of people on my travels before.

Overwhelmed by your humility

15. Posted by kindred (Full Member 22 posts) 9y

Just be aware that very often the first four or five dishes on the menu in Northern China are usually dog - this is a common dish in the north. I wont eat in a restaurant that serves dog because I feel that no matter what I order it will be cooked in the same pots as the dog was.

Also be aware that fish is seldom cleaned before being cooked and served and you get all the "innards" with it - a delicacy.

Being cautious about what you eat is not being fussy, its being smart - I know more than a few foreigners who have become sick as dogs (no pun intended) from just jumping in and eating the local foods - things that we pampered North Americans simply CANNOT handle - raw sea urchin anyone? boiled intestines? fried dog?

A lot of restaurants have "displays" of their food and you can just point to what you want - "western" needn't be expensive, for an example The East Hotel in Dalian, China is reasonable compared to Canada and has good buffets -

16. Posted by rama_h (Inactive 91 posts) 9y

Well... do what I do... If you're not sure about the local foods, there's always a local McDonald's or KFC around... That's what I did in countries that barely use english... I did it in Vietnam, did it in Thailand... but that only lasted for the first 2 days... after that I'll try out for myself what the locals will recommend...

17. Posted by Budai (Respected Member 506 posts) 9y

thai and cambodian cuisine use alot of spices and delicate flavours such as lemongrass, so i guess you wont enjoy it much... Try the tom yam at least once, its good, and in cambodia try the amoc...

Being cautious about what you eat is not being fussy, its being smart


Yes i definitely do agree - being sick spoils your trip as much as being robbed, especially if you are travelling alone in a less developed country where healthcare facilities may not be so adequate. normally if i see it being cooked and there are locals eating there id give it a try, and most times w/o english menus id just do the same as wouterr and point to what i like, its part of the fun to me... Normally id take the amount of locals eating as a rough gauge of the quality/ locality (?) sorry cant find a better word atm, of the food.

[ Edit: Edited on Jan 13, 2007, at 7:13 AM by itenerant ]

18. Posted by rbyslipahs (Respected Member 349 posts) 9y

In Thailand, if you're not sure what you are eating or if it's a bad day for your stomach, just order some basic pad Thai. You can get it anywhere, and it's fast, cheap, and easy to down.

As far as being able to read what is on the menu, unless you are visiting remote hill tribes, most places will make an attempt at English. And, especially if you're eating at a night market, you'll run into other travellers or someone who can explain things to you. I only speak a few words in Thai, just basic greetings, thank you, etc., and I didn't feel at a loss at any point. Hell, I even lost my medicine for my asthma in Bangkok and was able to get it in Aranyaprathet--no English required.

Communication doesn't always require speaking the same language.

And, for the record, I can be a picky eater as well, but sometimes it's worth just trying something while you are there. You never know. I had squid for three days, and I don't like squid normally, but this was actually pretty good! Helped that it was fresh and cooked well.

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