Skip Navigation

End of a road?

Travel Forums General Talk End of a road?

Page

Last Post

1. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

There are times in life when you feel you have reached the end of the road you are travelling on, or at least as far as you want to travel on it, and you need to take a different road. If that has happened to you or if you would like to place yourself in a hypothetical question, the following question is for you:

Supposing the above-mentioned road was your career and that you had taken a decision, say 3-4 years ago, that you would rather change jobs than continue in your old job and you start your new work, initially enthusiastically, motivated but gradually realize that this career path also leads to a dead-end, what would you do?

2. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 9y

Depends what you (the hypothetical "you") mean by dead-end: Do you no longer get any satisfaction out of your job? Or have you financially or climb-the-ladderly hit the end of the road? A satisfying job is far better that a better paying job that you hate, as long as you're able to pay the bills.

I'd say if you've given your job a fair chance and have realized that it's really not for you, take steps to find a new direction. We're no longer living in an age where you find a job and keep it forever. People change career paths all the time. You just need to give it thought and effort.

The only thing I'd caution is not to bounce around aimlessly and quit before giving each career path a chance. A friend-of-a-friend has this strange habit of going back to school, finding a job, working a straight 9-to-5 without investing more than he has to, then losing his job and going back to school again. Waste of time and a great denial of something a lot more fundemental going on.

3. Posted by Pardus (Respected Member 2356 posts) 9y

Quoting Ahila

Supposing the above-mentioned road was your career and that you had taken a decision, say 3-4 years ago, that you would rather change jobs than continue in your old job and you start your new work, initially enthusiastically, motivated but gradually realize that this career path also leads to a dead-end, what would you do?

Well, I can speak from experience on this one - after 15 years in accounting with numerous changes in jobs it's still not working out. And to make matters worse, I never really wanted to get into accounting, it was a choice of convenience, laziness and negative influences.
When I came to Ireland I thought things would change - and indeed they have - but I still ended up being here 5 years. Working in acocunting. The excuse was to get money to go travelling but somehow that didn't materialise the way I thought it would. Going to Africa really changed my life and I knew that I wanted to make a difference and change my life but didn't know how.
By sheer chance I stumbled upon a course in Media Techniques and I thought this would be something I am interested in and wanted to see if what I imagined the Media work to be and what it is really like.
And I got hooked, this was the best thing that could ever happen to me. Suddenly I get a direction in life that about 3 years back I'd never have thought of. And I feel as if everything that happened was for a reason - if I'd gone to University and study journalism or anything when I was 16 my live would have been different for sure, but I've had experiences that compliment my newfound goal.

For me, my mantra has become: 'If you don't like it - change it. Look out for what you want and take steps to get there'.
So in your situation I would look around you and see what you really like doing, what you really are passionate about. And then see if there's anything that involves that subject. Every job will get repetitive after a while, but if you really enjoy it then it takes longer for it to become dull. I think live is too short to do something you don't like. Do your preparation, learn about things and then leap in.

4. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Quoting tway

Depends what you (the hypothetical "you") mean by dead-end

Well 'dead-end' could be anything 'you' want it to be but I was thinking of it rather in terms of 'satisfaction', 'meaningful', 'positive', 'growth (and not limited to income growth)' etc.

[ Edit: Edited on Jan 19, 2007, at 6:40 AM by Ahila ]

5. Posted by GregW (Travel Guru 2635 posts) 9y

Quoting Ahila

Supposing the above-mentioned road was your career and that you had taken a decision, say 3-4 years ago, that you would rather change jobs than continue in your old job and you start your new work, initially enthusiastically, motivated but gradually realize that this career path also leads to a dead-end, what would you do?

Obviously you don't want to stay in your present job, so a change is in order. Are you concerned that if you change again you'll be in the same situation again in 3 or 4 years? That's possible, but what's your other option - staying in the same job because you are afraid you'll keep ending up disappointing yourself.

Seems to me that the bes thing to do is to try something new. Maybe it'll work out, maybe it won't. But at least you'll have tried.

Greg

6. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Thanks for your responses.

Quoting tway

The only thing I'd caution is not to bounce around aimlessly and quit before giving each career path a chance. A friend-of-a-friend has this strange habit of going back to school, finding a job, working a straight 9-to-5 without investing more than he has to, then losing his job and going back to school again. Waste of time and a great denial of something a lot more fundemental going on.

Tina: Just curious, how would you define 'aim' in a career path? I agree with you though that there is usually a 'denial of something a lot more fundamental' when one keeps changing career paths often.

Quoting Pardus

Every job will get repetitive after a while, but if you really enjoy it then it takes longer for it to become dull. I think live is too short to do something you don't like.

Phil: I think you have a point there that every job will get repetitive after a while, but I agree that life is too short to do something one doesn't like which is why I have always lived by the mantra, "your heart must be in the work you do", besides being a workaholic.

Good to hear that you were courageous to make a change after 15 years of investment in a career. People usually get cold feet after a couple of years in a particular career. Good Luck!

Quoting GregW

Are you concerned that if you change again you'll be in the same situation again in 3 or 4 years? That's possible, but what's your other option - staying in the same job because you are afraid you'll keep ending up disappointing yourself.

Greg:Yes, I guess it is a case of "once bitten, twice shy". Especially, when you are doing the job that you thought would give you the biggest fulfillment in life, where your career and ideals seemed to be well matched, and you realize that even though you are proceeding very well in the career ladder (in terms of material aspects: income, recognition etc), that the 'fulfillment' is missing because it is all a mirage.

[ Edit: Edited on Jan 19, 2007, at 2:34 PM by Ahila ]

7. Posted by GregW (Travel Guru 2635 posts) 9y

Quoting Ahila

Especially, when you are doing the job that you thought would give you the biggest fulfillment in life, where your career and ideals seemed to be well matched, and you realize that even though you are proceeding very well in the career ladder (in terms of material aspects: income, recognition etc), that the 'fulfillment' is missing because it is all a mirage.

I would suggest picking up and reading a book called "What Should I Do With My Life?" by Po Bronson. In it, he interviews people who left their careers and started on entirely new paths. One of the most important things I think he found was that you don't get fulfillment from doing something that rewards you well materially, and you don't get fulfillment doing something fun. You get fulfillment doing something you feel is IMPORTANT.

What he doesn't cover is how to figure out what is important to you. But I think it's an important step. What is important?

8. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Quoting GregW

What he doesn't cover is how to figure out what is important to you. But I think it's an important step. What is important?

What is important? I would be curious indeed to see what is important to each TP member in terms of their career...

For me, it is important that the work I do contributes to improving the human condition, in whatever small way possible. Hence, I chose the economic development career field deviating away from a numerical academic background. Only now, it feels that there are so many other factors at play, beyond your power, that really make you feel 'are you really contributing at all or is it just like filling water in a bucket with a hole?'. One doesn't really want to waste one's time in this life, which can just cease at any moment...

I would really like to know if any other TP member has found out what is important to them and are working in a career in line with that realization and if yes, are you satisfied? if you are not working in a career that fulfills what is important to you or you are not satisfied, why aren't you?

[ Edit: Edited on Jan 23, 2007, at 5:18 PM by Ahila ]

9. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 9y

Quoting Ahila

Quoting tway

The only thing I'd caution is not to bounce around aimlessly and quit before giving each career path a chance...

Tina: Just curious, how would you define 'aim' in a career path?

Hmm. I meant more that one shouldn't aimlessly go from one career to the next without giving at least giving it a real try. I guess "aim" would mean direction. A career path, by definition, needs somewhere to go - a "next step" to achieve - in order not to grow stale. I think that's often how people grow bored of their jobs, settling in and not knowing, or at least being curious about, what's next.

I kinda fell into my career by accident - I knew I wanted to write but I never knew what a "copywriter" was until I applied and got a junior job at an agency. The first year was like a copywriting tour of duty, but I learned a lot and now love what I get to do. If I'd quit the first year, I would have missed out on the satisfaction of finally 'getting it'.

Mind, 3-4 years is a good bit of time to invest. If you're unsatisfied now, there's probably something behind it. Not to sound trite, but life's too short. Your career is part of who you are, best make it something you enjoy getting up in the morning for.

10. Posted by Ahila (Inactive 1529 posts) 9y

Quoting tway

[quote=Ahila]
I kinda fell into my career by accident - I knew I wanted to write but I never knew what a "copywriter" was until I applied and got a junior job at an agency. The first year was like a copywriting tour of duty, but I learned a lot and now love what I get to do. If I'd quit the first year, I would have missed out on the satisfaction of finally 'getting it'.

Good point there! :)