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Trans Siberian

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1. Posted by Cuchulainn (Budding Member 2 posts) 9y

Hi all,

New poster! I'm intending to do the trans siberian railway sometime later this year or maybe early next year. Has anyone ever done this?
Any bits of advice of information would be greatly appreciated!

2. Posted by Tory-Vic (Budding Member 87 posts) 9y

Hi,
you want to make all the ttip?
Non-stop?
I think i would like to have such a trip this summer, but I am planning to stop in some places to see around.

Vic.

3. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 9y

There actually appears to be quite a number of TP members who did this, or are planning to in the short term. If you browse back a few pages, you'll find another thread on the subject.

Niels

4. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 9y

Quoting bentivogli

There actually appears to be quite a number of TP members who did this, or are planning to in the short term. If you browse back a few pages, you'll find another thread on the subject.

Niels

Ah a lazy member!

5. Posted by Gelli (Travel Guru 2457 posts) 9y

Yes, i've done it twice (Trans-Sib and Trans-Manch in full) and numerous trips into Siberia and on large chunks of the route. Give me a few more details/questions and i can help, but don't even know where to start without any points of reference

6. Posted by Cuchulainn (Budding Member 2 posts) 9y

Hi

I planning to do around the world trip going from Ireland, South America, North America and Canada. Was hoping to get a flight from Nome in Alaska to Chukotka (Russia), then getting the train at Khabarovsk. How long does it take to travel from there to Moscow?

7. Posted by Utrecht (Moderator 5595 posts) 9y

About a week! if you don't leave the train that is;)

8. Posted by wouterrr (Travel Guru 3379 posts) 9y

I had the intention to do this a few years ago. Did some research but decided not to go (went somewhere else).

The Trans Siberian is the longest train journey in the world. It takes you through the eur-asian continent. You will pass cities like Moscow, Jekaterinenburg, Novosibirsk and Irkutsk. You will even pass 10 timezones. During the journey you will hear different languages and you will see Europeans change into Asians. The more stopovers, the more expensive this journey will be.

There are a few tracks to choose from. Any experienced Trans- Siberian travellers should correct me if I am wrong.

1. from Moscow to Peking
2. from Moscow via Ulan Bator (Mongolia) to Peking
3. from Moscow via Alma-Ata (Kazachstan, Borat's place), Urumqi (western China) to Peking.
4. from Moscow to Wladiwostok and to Japan (by boat).

9. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 9y

THe cheapest way to do the journey from Europe is either by Serbian Star Ticket (google for it) or by EuroDomino 8 days of Russia ticket.

10. Posted by Gelli (Travel Guru 2457 posts) 9y

There are a few tracks to choose from. Any experienced Trans- Siberian travellers should correct me if I am wrong.

1. from Moscow to Peking
2. from Moscow via Ulan Bator (Mongolia) to Peking
3. from Moscow via Alma-Ata (Kazachstan, Borat's place), Urumqi (western China) to Peking.
4. from Moscow to Wladiwostok and to Japan (by boat).

As you ask so nicely, I will so correct you

WARNING TO ALL - I'm killing some time here waiting for the damned printer, so this is a long and all encompasing answer.

Firstly, ignoring a couple of privately owned luxury trains used for tourists paying Huuuuuge suyms of money, there is no Trans Siberian train, and never has been. It refers instead to the route taken, not the train itself.

Second, Despite what 98% of Westerners believe, the Trans-Siberian train DOES NOT - and never has - gone to Beijing/Peking. Most people lump together "long train trips heading East from Moscow" under the heading of Trans Siberian, and this is actually wrong, although most include parts of the Trans Siberian route, which from Omsk to Tayshet (?? possibly. I can't remember ) is the only route East.

The Trans Siberian is the route between Moscow and Vladivostock. The route has changed on occassions over the years [it used to include boat rides, for example, was much shorter when the Soviets owned what is now NE China as the route was more direct, and as recently as the early 90s wasn't accessible all the way through to foreigners - and even most Russians - due to Vladivostock being a naval city, forbidden to outsiders. The route used to run to somehwere who's name i forget, but may well have been Zakhodka where the ferry to Japan used to run to.The break up of the USSR also lead to a slight change of route to avoid a corner of what became Northern Kazakhstan] and even now is not a 100% fixed route, as between Moscow and Ekaterinburg (the first city that you get to across the Urals and into Asia) there are two different routes used, and two different stations in Moscow that you can depart from, although they are opposite each other.

The KM markers are changed peridically to reflect the routeing and this changes and can vary by a number of KM depending on the exact route you take. The through train from Moscow to Vladivostok leaves every other day and is called the Rossiya.

From Vladivostock, you can either head across to China and Harbin, down to the North Korean border and peer in, or get the ferry to either Japan or South Korea to continue your surface travels.

The other two main journeys which people class as Trans Siberian are Moscow - Irkutsk - Ulan Bator (Mongolia) - Beijing, which is the Trans-Mongolian route, and Moscow - Irkutsk - Zabikalsk - Harbin - Beijing, which is the Trans Manchurian. Each of these has one direct through train per week in each direction. Most travellers who say that they do the Trans-Siberian actually do the Trans-Mongolian route via Mongolia to Beijing.

On the two direct trains to Beijing, you CANNOT get on and off. The train is for through passengers only. However, there are plenty of other trains over different sections (lots as far as Ulan Ude [or Chita on the Trans Manchurian]) which you can use before the final run. Most people stop in Irkutsk and Ulan Bator.

3. from Moscow via Alma-Ata (Kazachstan, Borat's place), Urumqi (western China) to Peking

This is the most adventuorous of the 4 that Wouterrr mentions, although it heads much further south than the others, on a completely different routeing, and doesn't actually enter Siberia at all.

In addition, from Tayshet (i think, but can't remember), [a town between Krasnoyarsk and Irkutsk at any rate] there is line called the BAM, which although something of a White elephant actually passes to the North of Lake Baikal, and then in general about 800 or so Km North of the Trans Siberian route, finishing in a place who's name completely escapes me, in the middle of absolutely nowhere, on the East coast from where you can get a boat to Sakhalin. It was originally designed to try and open up some more of Siberia and allow the vast amounts of coal/minerals in the area to be better exploited. VERY few foreigners use this route East of Severobaikalsk, and it passes through even less of any relevance than the trans siberian route East of Chita does. Plans to eventually build North through to Yakutsk will take a long time to occur, if in fact it ever does.

There are also a number of other long direct trains you can take East from Moscow [and elsewhere] into Siberia and then along assorted branch lines.

Incidentally, although the 9259km (i think...) Moscow - Vladivostok Rossiya service is the "classic" Trans Siberian train, there are actually two longer direct train journeys that you can do: From Donetsk/Kiev in the Ukraine to Vladivostock [Which follows the Rossiya route from Ekaterinberg all across the physical Trans Siberian route*] every othre day, and also from Moscow to Pyongyang, which is a connected to the Trans Manchuarian train from Moscow until Shenyang (or thereabouts) in China before continuing into North Korea.

  • Although Moscow - Vladivostok is the Trans-Siberian route, Siberia doesn't actually start until just before you reach Tyumen, about 5hours East of Ekaterinburg and 30hours or so East of Moscow, meaning that technically, the Trans-Siberian route is Tyumen to Vladivostok. The Ukraine - Vladivostok train covers the whole of this.

ANd here endeth the warble. Printer is ready, so i'm off to do some more work :)

Hope that helped somebody, somehow!