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for the love of god. someone please answer this question

Travel Forums Off Topic for the love of god. someone please answer this question

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1. Posted by oslaue (Full Member 571 posts) 9y

dublin = 1.2 million people.

of those of what i already know there is 200k polish, and 100k Chinese!
Many other nationality’s that takes that figure up further leaving very little irish but nothing compared to london.

i am wondering but how do Chinese people get into the country? especially that amount!!! i know poles are now part of the EU so that’s okay.

my x girlfriend who is white - south african couldn’t set foot in ireland!!! how do the Chinese do it? im sorry but the majority of the Chinese all work in restaurants so i am wondering what kind of visas are these guys on?

They are not working in skilled jobs so that rules that out. They cant be illegal … so how do they get in? if you are American / south African / australian etc its impossible to live it out Ireland…so what makes the Chinese so special?

plus there is huge turf wars and the triads are here, but how come they are allowed to stay, i dont get it.

[ Edit: Edited on Feb 19, 2007, at 2:25 AM by oslaue ]

2. Posted by Utrecht (Moderator 5595 posts) 9y

That's a lot of polish people as well....they were in Holland before 2004 as well. Guess there are illegal people from that country for sure. Are those chinese people in Dublin for just a couple of years? In Holland, we have lots of chinese, but they have been immigrating since the 50's or 60's. Nowadays, there aren't many new chinese people arriving here.
I guess if there is a good reason for coming to ireland, people from any nation can get to Ireland. But maybe there is a shortage of unskilled people in Ireland as well? That would explain the polish of course a little bit.
By the way, is it a problem, chinese people?

3. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 9y

Simple, you pay a very heavy price.

For my family it was 9 years of begging and my parents never worked in their skilled trades ever again. Despite the fact that my mom was one of the best architects in all of China. In Canada, the NDP is making a national issue of the fact that, despite the shortage of nurses, doctors, engineers, etc., many skilled immigrants do not have their qualifications and skills recognized. The cab driver with the PhD. in economics is a reality.

4. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

A lot of Chinese were granted asylum, in Ireland, in the 60s, I think. I dont know the exact history. There was some trouble in China, at the time. The Irish government gave them grants, to start busineses, in Ireland, in order to provide employment for them. Their English would not have been good enough, to get regular jobs. Many of them started restaurants and take outs.
Maybe more came, at other times, because of political problems, in China.

Mel

5. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting Utrecht

By the way, is it a problem, chinese people?

No, as far as I know, they never caused any trouble.
And, they were the only providers of exotic food, for a long time. Mass immigration is a relatively new thing, in Ireland.

6. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting Q'

Simple, you pay a very heavy price.

For my family it was 9 years of begging and my parents never worked in their skilled trades ever again. Despite the fact that my mom was one of the best architects in all of China. In Canada, the NDP is making a national issue of the fact that, despite the shortage of nurses, doctors, engineers, etc., many skilled immigrants do not have their qualifications and skills recognized. The cab driver with the PhD. in economics is a reality.

I dont know how well, foreigners qualifications are recognised, in Ireland. But Ireland accepts a lot of foreign students. They pay ridiculously high fees, while Irish citizens dont have to pay fees, at all. One Canadian guy studying in Dublin told me he got his masters degree, in Ireland, and has now been accepted onto a doctorate course. He says, he did not even finish high school, in Canada. He is however paying a lot of money, for his education, in Ireland.
I also spoke with a Chinese guy, who is also paying huge fees, for his education, in Ireland.
Makes a pharse, out of education, in my opinion.

[ Edit: Edited on Feb 19, 2007, at 7:28 AM by Mel. ]

7. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 9y

Quoting Mel.

I dont know how well, foreigners qualifications are recognised, in Ireland. But Ireland accepts a lot of foreign students. They pay ridiculously high fees, while Irish citizens dont have to pay fees, at all. One Canadian guy studying in Dublin told me he got his masters degree, in Ireland, and has now been accepted onto a doctorate course. He says, he did not even finish high school, in Canada. He is however paying a lot of money, for his education, in Ireland.
I also spoke with a Chinese guy, who is also paying huge fees, for his education, in Ireland.
Makes a pharse, out of education, in my opinion.

Foreign students are completely different situation. It's much easier to enter a country on a student visa. No school is going to turn down extra money. The typical fees are 3 to 4 times higher for foreign students in Canada. That's before regular living expenses, which every student still needs to put out. Qualifications don't really become an issue in this case because you're not on the legal "hook" for anything.

I'm talking about trained adults who want to work. Basically there are people in Toronto that have 4 to 8 years of training in their native countries to become a doctor or engineer, etc., and then are asked to spend another 2 to 5 years of training in their new country to even get a job at the lowest pay scale. All while trying to feed yourself and family. Everyone, including the people in the schools and the government, admit that the training is useless, or that on the job training would be better. But to become officially recognized, legally able to practice medicine, engineering etc., that's what you have to do. What they're trying to do is come up with a more reasonable method of recognizing these people who are sitting idle not contributing to the economy, and getting them work in a worthwhile way.

8. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 9y

Quoting Mel.

He says, he did not even finish high school, in Canada. He is however paying a lot of money, for his education, in Ireland.
I also spoke with a Chinese guy, who is also paying huge fees, for his education, in Ireland.
Makes a pharse, out of education, in my opinion.

I'm not sure about that. Citizens in any given country pay taxes - sometimes through the nose - to help cover the costs of higher education. If foreign students paid the same tuition fees as citizens, they'd a) be getting what amounts to a free ride courtesy of their host country and b) potentially be taking the place of a student who's a citizen of that country. Perhaps foreign-student fees are too high, and qualified, ambitious students should get priority over mediocre ones - but those fees are there for a reason.

9. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

It is not the fees, that I think make a pharse out of education, Tway.
It is that people like that Canadian guy did not finish high school, yet he can still buy his way right through the Irish university educational system.
In a way, it takes the value out of my qualifications.

[ Edit: Edited on Feb 19, 2007, at 8:29 AM by Mel. ]

10. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 9y

Quoting Mel.

It is not the fees, that I think make a pharse out of education, Tway.
It is that people like that Canadian guy did not finish high school, yet he can still buy his way right through the Irish university educational system.
In a way, it takes the value out of my qualifications.

Ah - the bit about the Chinese student paying high fees threw me off. It's definitely a farce when someone can essentially "buy" their education while everyone else struggles through. Still, aren't mature students who did not complete high school allowed to go to university to make up any missing credits? I know here in Quebec, a mature student who did not attend CEGEP (the obligatory bridge between high school and university) can go straight to university. I guess a combination of life experience and a few make-up classes is enough to fill the blanks.