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Turkey and PKK Terror

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91. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting stuthkfl

I think if something seems to be wrong with ROJ, Turkish government should file a complaint at the Danish government, with a suggestion to investigate this.

They've complained, and judge decided that it's freedom of speech. now it's beeing judged again with new prooves.

If it is being judged again, then it may finally be stopped. ;)

92. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting Herr Bert

Taken out of the context, a picture of the prophet depicted as a terrorist is not funny, but why can't it be funny when you see it in the context how it was meant?

Kinda difficult to do, in some countries, where the government censors all information, it doesnt want people to see. Not that Turkey is one of those countries. Not completely, anyway.;)

93. Posted by wotthefiqh (Inactive 1447 posts) 9y

Quoting Herr Bert

As I posted before, there is a thin line between terrorists and freedomfighters. (often it only depends on which side you are on). Strictly speaking the resistance during WWII, would in today's world be regarded a terrorists.

F*** Bollocks!!!
Only if you are a Neo-Nazi.
I see nothing terrorist about fighting against Fascist ideology which enslaved humanity, viewed much of the human race as untermenschen and used slavery as an economic tool.
Without the Maquis, Tito's partisans, Russian partisans, the Warsaw Army of 1944, etc, you would probably be a Rottenfuhrer in the SS-Grenadier-Regiment 1 Landstorm Nederland sitting in a foxhole on the eastern slopes of the Urals saving the Third Reich (or maybe Fourth) from the Asiatic hordes.
From cultural relativism to political relativism to historical relativism.
Total nonsense, but if I went with it, give me Viking Berserkers any day.
At least they killed without some spurious reason, just for the sheer halibut.

94. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting stuthkfl

[
Because they call them gerillas, they use war word instead of terrorism to describe how they fight against Turkey.

I think the word gurilla, in this context, actually means the same as terrorrist. ????
It is certainly, not a more flattering or respectable word, than terrorist.;)

95. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting stuthkfl

In a couple of years ago, Police has a great authorization for riots and none of them could make riots in cities. However, after EU regulation laws, managing riots become really hard for us because of the limited authority of police forces.

What methods, would the police in Turkey like to use, to control riots?
Which of these methods, will the EU not allow?

96. Posted by Herr Bert (Moderator 1384 posts) 9y

Quoting wotthefiqh

Quoting Herr Bert

As I posted before, there is a thin line between terrorists and freedomfighters. (often it only depends on which side you are on). Strictly speaking the resistance during WWII, would in today's world be regarded a terrorists.

F*** Bollocks!!!
Only if you are a Neo-Nazi.
I see nothing terrorist about fighting against Fascist ideology which enslaved humanity, viewed much of the human race as untermenschen and used slavery as an economic tool.
Without the Maquis, Tito's partisans, Russian partisans, the Warsaw Army of 1944, etc, you would probably be a Rottenfuhrer in the SS-Grenadier-Regiment 1 Landstorm Nederland sitting in a foxhole on the eastern slopes of the Urals saving the Third Reich (or maybe Fourth) from the Asiatic hordes.
From cultural relativism to political relativism to historical relativism.
Total nonsense, but if I went with it, give me Viking Berserkers any day.
At least they killed without some spurious reason, just for the sheer halibut.

wotthefiqh, calm down,

No, I would never be a Nazi, as a bisexual I would most likely have been gassed.

I just wanted to make the point, that what is an obvious attempt to free your country from an occupation, can in the eyes of the enemy, be regarded as a terrorist.

PKK by Kurds can been seen as freedom fighters, and by the Turkish government as Terrorists. I was hoping to make such an obvious, example of resistance people in WWII(freedom-fighters) using basicly the same methods as terrorists, that you would at least see, that there are groups that can be labelled Terrorists, and groups that can be labelled Freedom fighters, but also that there is also a large grey area, in which the different is much harder to tell. And where it's depending on which site you are on, what your judgement of such a group is.

97. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting stuthkfl

Then how they're questioning Turkey's laws like death penalty, article 301 etc.?

What do u think, about the death penalty, in Turkey, Stuthkfl?
I think one big problem with the existance of the death penalty, is that different countries, have different crimes, that they apply it for. I think this makes it very unfair. In some countries, I think it is applied, for crimes that I would not consider so serious. In some countries people dont even get a fair trial, in my opinion. ;)

98. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting stuthkfl

If laws are different, then opinions, reflections are different as well... Maybe people who has threat them by calliing are pretty well with their countries religious laws?

Human rights laws are international. All member countries of the UN are asked to uphold the UN laws of human rights. EU requires Turkey and any country who is a member of the EU or wants to be a member, to obey these laws.;)

99. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting stuthkfl

What is US doing in Iraq now? Are they in there for oil or to use more guns...?

I think, they are in Iraq, for both of those reasons. ;)

100. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting Herr Bert

In my opinion Turkey is much more developed that a country like Bulgaria, that joined recently, but somehow people here don't (want to) see that. I would really think it is a shame, if Turkey would quit their attempt to become a member.

It is not a question of how developed, they are, before they join the EU. What is important is, that they are fertile ground, to establish strong democracies, while having a certain standard of peace and human rights. Then they are considered ripe, for development by the EU, with a view, to becomming contributing members, in the future. Since the former Eastern block European countries have gotten rid, or their dictators, they have shown themselves to have the potential to be EU members. ;)

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