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what about your careers?

Travel Forums General Talk what about your careers?

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1. Posted by bennnn (Inactive 93 posts) 9y

hi all,

okay, i'm sure this question would've been raised somewhere scattered among these forums, but i can't seem to find it...

But my question is: what happens to your career while you travel?

I mean, I studied 12 years of schooling + 4 years of uni. Graduate with a degree, and now its time to settle onto a job.. that's the way it works right?
If I leave my job now to do travelling, I pretty much put my career/life/savings on hold for that period of time (I'm talking years here).
And during that time, you could well earn a promotion and receive a higher salary, or a better job, or land that car you like, or a number of real estate properties.
You worked hard for years to save up for this trip, and by quitting your job, and spending and flying around, you'll return effectively broke.

What about your future then? How do you pick up where you left off? Do you start over from scratch? At an older age, is that too late?
While your friends around your age has a BMW and 3 investment properties, you're left with $3000 and still renting.

LOL call me paranoid!
I guess its because coming from an Asian 'way of thinking', my family keeps warning me of the risk.
"You can work now, save and play later and enjoy it. Or you can play now, but have to atone for it later in life..."

Have any of you had that concern? Most importantly, did you have any regrets? even the slightest regret...

2. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 9y

Look at it from this angle; you'll have regrets anyway, so better do what you think is best now, instead of indefinitely postponing enjoyment. If you think that travelling is best for you, instead of embarking on a career, better do so. I'd prefer not having a career and be happy over conforming to social expectation and not being able to follow my heart.

Careers are unpredictable beasts, anyway. I thought I'd have one, but it didn't work out soon enough, and now I'm engaged in an utterly useless research project, void of any work perspective whatsoever... the kind that future non-uni employers are highly suspicious of. Yet, I am glad I did so, and no doubt something career-like will cross my path once I'm finished, even though my colleagues and me don't fit a well-defined societal slot. Don't live the future!

3. Posted by anglosurma (Respected Member 106 posts) 9y

I quit my good stable job i worked hard in for 5 years got a good pay and promotion and a nice car and id probably own my own home now , and i give it all up to travel,I have no regrets + if your good enough you can always go back or fit straight in somewhere else with the right and experience.
But as for owning real estates and Bmw cars, its up to you what you want most out of life.
Me personally id rather travel whilst im young healthy and have no one to consider but myself and gain the knowledge and wisdom and life experience that may improve me as a person for my self and those around me , and if my freind ownes two houses and bmw car by the time i get home then good for them if thats what makes them happy, as for me im happy enough with my backpack with the few things in it and living without all the other comforts we take for granted in the west, with the feelings of the unkown everday im born again how can i regret that, who knows maybe when im 60 i might have regrets if i end up with no pention scheme {super annuation}

4. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4835 posts) 9y

Quoting bennnn

I mean, I studied 12 years of schooling + 4 years of uni. Graduate with a degree, and now its time to settle onto a job.. that's the way it works right?
If I leave my job now to do travelling, I pretty much put my career/life/savings on hold for that period of time (I'm talking years here).
And during that time, you could well earn a promotion and receive a higher salary, or a better job, or land that car you like, or a number of real estate properties.
You worked hard for years to save up for this trip, and by quitting your job, and spending and flying around, you'll return effectively broke.

You'll return with years of life experience, showing any potential future employer that you're the kind of person who goes out there and does things, who can handle unknown situations and turn them into positive experiences. Yes, you'll initially be lagging behind the people who finished university at the same time you did, but you'll have a tremendous advantage over those coming fresh and bright-eyed out of university.

(Although, personally, the biggest thing my travels taught me is that it's quite easy - and infinitely more satisfying - to survive fending for yourself. Why work for a boss when you can work for yourself? "The way it works" is whatever you make of it; travelling gives you a fresh perspective on this, helping to show other options, other paths to follow.)

Also, you talk about putting your life on hold... But as far as I'm (now) concerned, life is about living and experiencing, and a job (or gods forbid, a career) is just something that gives you the money to do that. Working long days, coming home exhausted, needing the weekends to recover and it then being Monday again already... that's putting life on hold. Travelling is picking up life and hurtling it down the hill. Sure, it might seem scary, but there's no no doubt that you'll be [i]moving[i]. :)

5. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 9y

Quoting bennnn

What about your future then? How do you pick up where you left off? Do you start over from scratch? At an older age, is that too late?
While your friends around your age has a BMW and 3 investment properties, you're left with $3000 and still renting.

I guess its a choice to some extent. Personally I choose the travelling over material stuff. :)

6. Posted by bennnn (Inactive 93 posts) 9y

Quoting magykal1

Quoting bennnn

What about your future then? How do you pick up where you left off? Do you start over from scratch? At an older age, is that too late?
While your friends around your age has a BMW and 3 investment properties, you're left with $3000 and still renting.

I guess its a choice to some extent. Personally I choose the travelling over material stuff. :)

Yeah I also had many people telling me they prefer to travel, to enjoy their time now before its too late..

But then, one still have to consider the future. This may be waaaay too far ahead to predict, but what if you wish to start a family. You'd want to have a steady paying job by then, have no mortgage (preferbly), and a somewhat healthy bank balance. And you wouldn't want to do that at a later age either... right?

Pls let me know if I'm assuming way off course...

7. Posted by asey16 (Budding Member 51 posts) 9y

I will accept that some people may beleive this to be untrue but...we only get one life. What is the point of working hard, earning money and getting promotions if you aren't out there having fun. Admittedly travelling isn't everyones idea of fun, but to me we only have one life and in it I want to experience as many different things as I can, and that means travelling to many different places.
I have left jobs before, and in September I will again. I save and save for years then spend it all on one trip. To me its completely worth it and have no regrets at all. Luckily, as a film producer/director and writer I can take some of my work with me, but it wouldn't matter if I couldn't. As long as you take people you love, or you have them to come back to, and you go out and experience as much as you can then it doesn't matter if you don't get the promotion or your company car.
Work to live, don't live to work.

8. Posted by NantesFC (Respected Member 531 posts) 9y

Luckily I'm not old enough to even have to worry about coming back to a career. However, I do intend on heading back to college in a bit but I've put that off by another year. Although I am looking forward to travelling for the rest of my life, I also want to have a decent job in between as well. I guess I can't really relate to you but our consequences are somewhat similar. I will always travel but at this point in my life I'm still able to dictate (or at least try to) how I want to balance a future career and travel. I'm not really interested in working at a factory for 40+ years although that's fine for others. If I'd ask for time off even if it was unpaid leave I'd surely be terminated instead and I don't want a job like that.

9. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Hello Bennnn:)

When making any decision in life, let desire and not fear be your motivator.
A useful tool I use to do this, is to project my mind forward, to when I am 80 years old, and imagine what life story I want to tell.

Keep your life balanced, to incorporate all the areas that are important to u. Ask yourself, which areas are important to u and to what degree. Family, friends, money, fun etc. Concentrate on getting each in the proportion that is important to u. U are very young, and your priorities may change as your life progresses. When they do, then reassess.

I am 37. I have traveled extensively, I have a national certificate in Information technology and a few other computer qualification. I have a wonderful boyfriend and daughter. I own an appartment in Dublin. I am not rich, but I have as much money as is important to me, without having to compromise the other things I want out of life.

No, I have no regrets. I really could not have wished for better, for myself.

Mel

10. Posted by AndyB24 (Respected Member 167 posts) 9y

You have to think of the benefits of travelling for years, You will have seen so much, experienced things that your future co-workers have only dreamed of. You will be far more organised after experiencing all the planning involved in travel. And when your boss is ranting about the profits for the 1st quarter, you can drift off to that beach in Thailand, or climb over the andes to look down on Macchu Picchu.

Personally, I would prefer to travel whilst young so that I can share my experiences with others. When I retire years into the future, I want to be able to think back to all my adventures, and tell the stories to my grandkids.

Lets face it, you are going to enjoy things more, and see more of a culture when you are young and inquisative, going places that you might think twice about if you wait till your mid 50s.