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what about your careers?

Travel Forums General Talk what about your careers?

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11. Posted by Ardy (Full Member 62 posts) 9y

I think everyone is thinking the same thing; life is to short. I have been country hopping for four years now... haven't been home for four years... when I do settle down I will always look back at my time now as the best choice.

12. Posted by KoalaGirl (Travel Guru 307 posts) 9y

Quoting Sander

You'll return with years of life experience, showing any potential future employer that you're the kind of person who goes out there and does things, who can handle unknown situations and turn them into positive experiences. Yes, you'll initially be lagging behind the people who finished university at the same time you did, but you'll have a tremendous advantage over those coming fresh and bright-eyed out of university.

(Although, personally, the biggest thing my travels taught me is that it's quite easy - and infinitely more satisfying - to survive fending for yourself. Why work for a boss when you can work for yourself? "The way it works" is whatever you make of it; travelling gives you a fresh perspective on this, helping to show other options, other paths to follow.)

Also, you talk about putting your life on hold... But as far as I'm (now) concerned, life is about living and experiencing, and a job (or gods forbid, a career) is just something that gives you the money to do that. Working long days, coming home exhausted, needing the weekends to recover and it then being Monday again already... that's putting life on hold. Travelling is picking up life and hurtling it down the hill. Sure, it might seem scary, but there's no no doubt that you'll be moving. :)

I totally agree with Sander - you really shouldn't be looking at Travelling as "putting your life on hold". I actually found that by combining travelling, with taking jobs in my field of work o/s, that I fast tracked my career. Employers do look at your travel experience as a positive - it certainly demonstrates certain personality traits that are highly desirable in a potential employee. And yeah, you may be 'behind' your peers sith regards to shiny cars and investment properties, but I know i would trade a shiny BMW for a plane ticket to a foreign country any day!

13. Posted by bennnn (Inactive 93 posts) 9y

hey all,

i guess what you're saying made sense to me..
I was just doubtful because at my workplace, we regularly get job applicants on working holiday, just cold applying. And 99% of the time, we ignored their emails...

And also I guess given that I'm sick of living with my parents (not in a bad way, I just prefer to have my independence), that its time to actually do something rather than just play Playstation every weekend. It has been fun, but its time to sell the bugger :(

Now I have a set of travelling questions, but I think I might start a new thread about it since its not related to this anymore.

Thanks for your wise words everyone! I think I might feel better telling about my travelling stories, rather than telling a story about how I got my BMW..

[ Edit: Edited on Apr 17, 2007, at 5:59 AM by bennnn ]

14. Posted by kir19 (Inactive 55 posts) 9y

hi bennnn,

i think the final line of your last post pretty much sums it up:

"I think I might feel better telling about my travelling stories, rather than telling a story about how I got my BMW.."

i could not agree with you more. objects are just objects. for some people objects make them happy, but for others travelling is the key to happiness. you just have to decide what's best for you.

i'm currently a graduate student, but in the next few months i will graduate and become an ESL teacher. i am thrilled that i will have 2 full months off every year to travel. it will be great to have a profession where i can be committed to my job for 10 months of the year and have the other 2 months to myself. perhaps the key to being happy is finding some sort of balance between "the real world" and travelling. one day i do hope to get married and have a family, but for right now, i'm happily looking forward to my upcoming trips :)

15. Posted by PeteMuzz (Budding Member 51 posts) 9y

Its that whole idea of "keeping up with the Jones". Why should we compare ourselves to someone else and what they have. They are living a different life then you and want different things. Where the point in aspiring to be something you do should rather then something you want to do.

I have a mate who has been travelling and is now embarking on a career, another mate who has jumped from job to job which he hates for money because he is not physically fit to do the job he wants. Everytime I talk about travelling he cant understand why i would "waste" all that money going round the world!

I finished university last year and i always thought I would get into a marketing career and would earn lots of money and love what i do. However I can no longer see a job/career that I would love to do ALL my life. Why work for someone else, ok for stupid amounts of money but at the end of your life what does it mean? So you can say to the kids or the grand kids "oh I was very high up in blah blah company". Big deal, your now sat on your death bed with nothing but a career is a pointless subject which helps no one. Of course thats just my business career point of view.

To end and maybe put this into perspective a bit. I have been saving up for over a year now working in a job i hate, living at home (which i hate) and only seeing my girlfriend at weekends. But in a few months i will doing the trip of a life time, hopefully the first of many and enjoying what i am doing. Where as i have a mate who has gone to uni for 4 years, got some extra qualifications while i've been doing my job and he is now a chartered accountant at age 22. He will now do that career for the next 40 years at least. Already i know its not something he has always wanted to do, its just a good career with good prospect. He already seems to be wondering if he can handle the job for the rest of his life. While he does, i'll be travelling, seeing places i want to see, learning things i never would of thought of and deciding what i really want from life. Who know what will happen but why measure myself against the people around me?

Hope that all makes some sense

16. Posted by anglosurma (Respected Member 106 posts) 9y

pete muzz

you coulden't have explained it better .

well said:)

17. Posted by susan404 (First Time Poster 1 posts) 9y

What about getting a career in the travel industry. That's what we did after toooo many years in corporate. Now we can travel the world and make money too. Do you know what kind of perks and benefits people on the "inside" of the travel industry get? It's remarkable. YUP - travel for a living.

18. Posted by Budai (Respected Member 506 posts) 9y

hi Ben,

Im from an Asian background as well and i must say i understand how it is like - People i know look down on backpackers generally as bums and irresponsible jerks who just leave everything behind to pursue a fickle fancy, a illusory dream... Well, they may be right, I may be a poor bum, but illl be a happy bum. Career wise, it seems that i will be destined for mediocrity, but it does not bother me at all - I basically see money as merely a means to happiness, and that not the other warped perspective that happiness is a function of money.

Life may be full of unexpected turns, hence people save and scourge, just in case one they life deals them an unfortunate hand. But my governing life philosophy borrows from Zen fluidity - i, instead of combating life and its mysterious ebb and flow, simply allow myself to be washed away with it, to embrace it and all it may bring. I may get cancer tomorrow, but it would just be another experience. Truth be told, i would rather tell my grandkids I fought cancer than how i got my first BMW/company/property. Learning to let go, learning that you cannot control life, even by building huge dams and levees, has made me see life in a different way, life to be embraced and celebrated evryday. Indeed, everyday, anywhere i am, in a slum, or in a polluted city, my eyes are filled with wonder.

It may be confused with mindless hedonism, but i assure you i am not. The Nietzschean superman concept who welcomes and embraces suffering, who transcends may be a closer image of what I hope to be. To be swept away by life without perverting its flow, for no army, no man, no riches can stand against Time and Age, only memories and experiences.

19. Posted by vxmike (Budding Member 64 posts) 9y

I suppose I'm fortunate in that my career allows tremendous flexibility in that I can move around, not work for a while, and change jobs at will without affecting my earning ability. Having a good realiable yet totally flexible income source is actually very important to me and part of the reason I entered the field I did (healthcare).

For travelling types like ourselves, I'd recommend pursuing a career in fields that are "skill based" in specific skills often requiring certification. What I mean is get skills that are always needed that you can do anywhere rather than base a "career" on working and building knowledge/skills/contacts for one company rather than building experience and skills that are freely transfered elsewhere.

Good = healthcare, mechanical work, skilled construction trades, etc. Skills that can get you a job almost anywhere with no ill effects of extended leaves from the working world or frequent job hopping. For example. A nurse can easily work 60 hours a week for a year to save, travel for two, then re-enter the workforce at the same pay/benefits.

Bad = any field where continued success is based upon time at a company or building up contacts/goodwill over time (such as sales).

The positive thing is that many of the "good" skills for travellers can be obtained with a couple years of schooling at a much lower cost than a traditional college education. Unfortunately too many people put down those who turn down the traditional college path. Unfortunate indeed because the average nurse or skilled diesel mechanic with two years of school can EASILY earn more than the average bachelor's degree holder in the US.

With the right skills you can be a sort of working 'mercenary' and work when needed at a high wage to support your needs. Right now I'm working hard to get my certifications to the right level in addition to building my nest egg for the longer term future, but in a couple years I'm looking to exit the permanent workforce and work on "as needed" basis to support my travelling needs.

20. Posted by the_wynner (Budding Member 17 posts) 9y

Quoting itenerant

hi Ben,

Im from an Asian background as well and i must say i understand how it is like - People i know look down on backpackers generally as bums and irresponsible jerks who just leave everything behind to pursue a fickle fancy, a illusory dream... Well, they may be right, I may be a poor bum, but illl be a happy bum. Career wise, it seems that i will be destined for mediocrity, but it does not bother me at all - I basically see money as merely a means to happiness, and that not the other warped perspective that happiness is a function of money.

Life may be full of unexpected turns, hence people save and scourge, just in case one they life deals them an unfortunate hand. But my governing life philosophy borrows from Zen fluidity - i, instead of combating life and its mysterious ebb and flow, simply allow myself to be washed away with it, to embrace it and all it may bring. I may get cancer tomorrow, but it would just be another experience. Truth be told, i would rather tell my grandkids I fought cancer than how i got my first BMW/company/property. Learning to let go, learning that you cannot control life, even by building huge dams and levees, has made me see life in a different way, life to be embraced and celebrated evryday. Indeed, everyday, anywhere i am, in a slum, or in a polluted city, my eyes are filled with wonder.

It may be confused with mindless hedonism, but i assure you i am not. The Nietzschean superman concept who welcomes and embraces suffering, who transcends may be a closer image of what I hope to be. To be swept away by life without perverting its flow, for no army, no man, no riches can stand against Time and Age, only memories and experiences.

A huge part of Zen involves the ego, as does the way to enlightenment.