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Cities in Germany

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1. Posted by kidgibnick (Budding Member 26 posts) 9y

I am a new member to this website, and so far i'm loving it...very informative! This is my first post...it's really helping me pass time at work on a Friday haha!

I spent 4 days in Munchen (Munich) in June and found it to be a wonderful city, full of beer gardens, and walkable streets.

What are your opinions on the most beautiful / liveable cities in Germany. I'm a 23 yr. old educated Canadian, who speaks some German...where would you suggest I live, if I was going to move (theorectially speaking)?

I hear Dusseldorf & Bremen are nice in the north.

Does anyone here live in Koln, Hamburg, Hannover, Bonn, Stuttgart, Munich, Berlin, Frankfurt, Karlsruhe, Essen etc?

I'm interested in cost of living, night life, youthful crowd, reputation, architecture etc.

2. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Hello Kidgibnick:)

I come from Ireland, and live in Munich.
I would suggest u live in the north of Germany, rather than the south. It is very conservative, down here in Bavaria.
I would prefer to live in Hamburg, or Berlin, but unfortunately there are not as many jobs there, as there are in Munich. I lived in Hamburg, for 2 years.
For the nightlife, Berlin is the one. Hamburg and Berlin, for the reputation and cost of living.

Mel

[ Edit: Edited on Apr 20, 2007, at 12:06 PM by Mel. ]

3. Posted by kidgibnick (Budding Member 26 posts) 9y

Can you elaborate on "conservative" ...

Is there a large "older" population?
what is the pub/bar/concert/club scene like in Munich?

Mel, can you freely work in the Munich because you have an EU citizenship? I'd give anything to be a dual Canadian/German/EU...I want to work over there. Sprichst du deutsch?

4. Posted by Herr Bert (Moderator 1384 posts) 9y

I say there is a difference in living in a city and visiting a city. If I would go a live in Germany, than I would go for Düsseldorf. My only other choice would be Berlin, but I had the feeling that Belin misses 'soul'. If you would include Austria, and the German speaking part of Switzerland, then I would choose Vienna.

In most German Cities, you won't find a lot of Architecture that predates the second world war, as most places were bombed. The smaller towns still have some old buildings, and an old centre.

What Mel means with conservative, I think she means to say it all a little bit more traditional, in the ways of thinking. Hanging on to old values. But then again you have Germany, and you have Bavaria. (Bayern)

If you have a EU pasport, you can work everywhere within the EU, but note, that in most places it's a must to speak the language, if you want (what my parents would call) a proper job.

5. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 9y

Hi,

as a Canadian you'll need a residency permit to stay for longer than 3 months in Germany. (If your enquiry is more than just theoretical, you are welcome to contact me about the details of getting a residency permit.)

If you want to live in Germany for longer, you'll also need a work permit or a stable income of roughly 700 EUR (depending on the city you pick), because if you cannot prove that you can support yourself you'll not get a residency permit. (But without residency permit no work permit, so this is a bit of a circle problem.)

As a general rule, cost of living is lower in East Germany, especially rent. If you only want to come to Germany to stay for bit and get to learn the language better, I recommend you pick a city in the East. Leipzig, Dresden and Rostock are quite nice - great city centers with some old buildings, good vibrant student nightlife. In my hometown (Magdeburg) it is possible to survive on 500 EUR a month, including rent and all. The situation should be similar in other East German cities. Note though that the job situation in the East is pretty bad, which is why the rent is so cheap. Many people have moved away from the east within the last years. My hometown was 260,000 people in 1990, now there are only 210,000 people living there. The rest has moved away to Western Germany - driving up real estate prices there.

Berlin is also relatively cheap. The situtation on the appartment market is favorable for tenants and the job situation is better there than in the surrounding east. Big B is a very multicultural city with lots of big international companies - if you intend to find a real job without speaking much German, try here.

6. Posted by S_Deisler (Respected Member 266 posts) 9y

Hello hello

I've been to Germany a couple of times in the past 2 years, both in the Cologne (Köln) region.
I spent a few days in Düsseldorf, and I thought it was a city that didn't have much living, like a very gray place, and perhaps a little bit sad. I'm not saying it's a bad place to live in, but maybe it's only I'm used to another type of city. Yet on the other hand, I felt something absolutely different while in Cologne.

7. Posted by kidgibnick (Budding Member 26 posts) 9y

Any other comments on Koln, Hamburg, Hannover, Bonn, Stuttgart, Munich, Berlin, Frankfurt, Karlsruhe, Essen etc ?

8. Posted by jaxstar84 (Respected Member 415 posts) 9y

beware of the dialects in the east tho... if you want to learn german i wouldnt recommend going anywhere NEAR sachsen!!

9. Posted by pfeiffer (Full Member 211 posts) 9y

Quoting kidgibnick

Any other comments on Koln, Hamburg, Hannover, Bonn, Stuttgart, Munich, Berlin, Frankfurt, Karlsruhe, Essen etc ?

For four days, they are all (more or less) worth a visit. And then you will have a better idea as to their "liveability".

Kevin
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Kevin Pfeiffer

10. Posted by pfeiffer (Full Member 211 posts) 9y

Quoting jaxstar84

beware of the dialects in the east tho... if you want to learn german i wouldnt recommend going anywhere NEAR sachsen!!

LOL. (As if Sachsen were the only state in Germany where dialect is spoken.)

I attended the Goethe-Institut in Dresden; you will be happy to know that we did not learn dialect and I was even able to communicate with people on the street. What drives me crazy is the sound of the Berlin dialect/accent.

Kevin

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Kevin Pfeiffer