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Prince George

Travel Forums North America Prince George

1. Posted by diver79 (Full Member, 29 posts) 7 Jun '07 05:54

diver79 has indicated that this thread is about Canada

Has anyone been to Prince George in Canada?

My ferry docks here from Vancouver Island and I was thinking of spending a few days, if it is worth the stop, and doing a bit of hiking or diving. I will be there mid September.

drop me a line if you've been

diver79

2. Posted by SteelBack (Budding Member, 9 posts) 10 Jun '07 23:27

I've been to PG, it's a northern town, which means automatically that there is not a ton to do, though some residents might disagree with me.

It has a nice unversity campus and a few interesting sights, but I wouldn't spend much time there. There are a lot of beautiful sights in northern BC and your better off doing something outdoorsish if you're into that sort of thing.

None the less the town is nice enough, there is just nothing particularily stunning about it.

Hope that helped a bit.

Cheers,

SB

3. Posted by diver79 (Full Member, 29 posts) 11 Jun '07 14:20

thanks for the info SteelBack.

I meant to find ask about Prince Rupert not George - staying at PG overnight on the train from PR to Jasper

do you recommend PR?

diver79

4. Posted by SamSalmon (Respected Member, 622 posts) 11 Jun '07 19:49

Prince Rupert has a lot to offer the outdoors enthusiast-and that's about it-the town itself is 'undistinguished' at best.

Whale Watching, Sport fishing, Kayaking are all excellent even Bear watching at at times although you may not have the time to do the fabled Khutzamateen

This site http://www.tourismprincerupert.com/ offers links to local tour operators some of which will take a single.

Be Advised that heavy floods have cut the area off for the past week and evacuation orders have just been lifted-water levels are dropping but you may still see some damage/be inconvenienced in small ways even months later.

5. Posted by kezin (Budding Member, 102 posts) 1 Sep '07 19:49

[quote=SamSalmon]Prince Rupert has a lot to offer the outdoors enthusiast-and that's about it-the town itself is 'undistinguished' at best.

- with all respect, I DO believe this is an unfair opinion on your part. Prince Rupert the City has a fascinating history. There are several very impressive older buildings on the historic main street. The city is ethnically diverse; it's citizens hail from everywhere on our planet. There are interesting and spirited events happening almost year around. There are fine restaurants offering regional as well as international cuisine. The people of the city are obliging and welcoming. and I certainly need not mention the stunning beauty of its location. just understand that it rains an awful lot there. September however, is a gorgeous time of year to be there. October thru June: RAIN RAIN RAIN.
- Hardly ' undistinguished '
best, kevin.

6. Posted by SamSalmon (Respected Member, 622 posts) 1 Sep '07 21:02

"I DO believe this is an unfair opinion on your part. "
What you believe means little -what counts is reality.

"Prince Rupert the City has a fascinating history. There are several very impressive older buildings on the historic main street."
Prince Rupert has a short history and the buildings as mentioned are run down and forgetable.

" The city is ethnically diverse; it's citizens hail from everywhere on our planet."
Some few dozen migrant workers don't make an ethnically diverse population.

" There are interesting and spirited events happening almost year around."
The events as mentioned revolve around consuming gross amounts of cheap alcohol-culture is completely absent.

" There are fine restaurants offering regional as well as international cuisine."
A handful of Chinese/Vietnamese and a few F&C places don't constitute a thriving ethnic food scene they reflect a population of under 20,000 people.

" The people of the city are obliging and welcoming."
It's true people are friendly if uninformed and limited.

" and I certainly need not mention the stunning beauty of its location."
The rain lifts a few times a month true.

" just understand that it rains an awful lot there."
I know, I know...

-"Hardly ' undistinguished '"
Hardly unique and worth more than a very short time.

7. Posted by kezin (Budding Member, 102 posts) 5 Sep '07 21:00

My 3 rain- soaked days in Prince Rupert ( part one ) :

- Stayed at a motel. During the course of the long night the parking lot outside my window provided high entertainment. Nonetheless, good value for what I payed and would stay there again.

- Enjoyed the following meals: a falafel ( not the best, but certainly adequate ) a bowl of unagi don ( very good ) a serving of Skeena River salmon ( poached ) that was beyond sublime. Also enjoyed an excellent curry. Could have had Chinese or Vietnamese food, or fish and chips for that matter, but did not. There were lots of options. One place had borscht on the menu.

- Had my morning coffee at an internet cafe. Reminded me of a place I remember in Copenhagen.

- Visited the Museum of Northern British Columbia. Extremely well- done. Respectful and restrained. Fascinating. I learned that the history of Prince Rupert goes back well over 10,000 years. At one time the area was one of the most densely populated in North America. The city is the traditional territory of the Tsimshian First nation. ( Nearby is Pike Island where one can- with the help of tour guides- visit ' archaeological ' sites ( where villages once were located ) and ' middens ' ( basically antique compost piles, mostly shells ) dating back 18 to 20 centuries ago. At low- tide petroglyphs, apparently, are visible) What really impressed me about the museum was its seeming unwillingness to
present the history of the region's First Nations in a ' romantic ' or ' academic ' fashion. The ' story ' of how the First Nations of the ' Prince Rupert ' region ( and beyond ) were impacted by the arrival of Europeans is treated with sensitivity and perspective. It is easy ( as well as legitimate, if not ' trendy ' ) to dismiss the whole concept of ' museums '. This sort of cynicism is understandable, and vital. I suppose all civilizations/cultures are- eventually- fair game for becoming ' contextualized ' within a ' museum '.

- There are a number of ' totem poles ' standing in the city, the work of both Tsimshian and Haida carvers. Very, very impressive. I also learned about the significance of the Longhouse, for uses both ceremonial and domestic, and the importance of cedar to the First Nations of this part of the coast. Although cedar is not ( far as I know ) a food, one could compare this special relationship to that between the Japanese and the soyabean; or the olive to Greece.

- Went for a ' heritage walk ' through Prince Rupert's Historical district. Clearly, this is not Edinburgh. But I was surprised by and impressed with the ( albeit small ) number of significant buildings I saw. They were unusual and interesting. They were reasonably well- maintained. Consider things in context. Vancouver's Marine Building is probably the city's most admired and praised architectual landmark. Were it to be placed alongside the Chrysler Building in New York City it would be considered with not much interest. I cannot imagine Vancouver without the Marine Building. Prince Rupert has architectural/historical context as well. Frommers ( www.frommers.com ) talks about the ' massive stone churches ' overlooking the city in a ' historic residential district '.

- Visited the Railway Museum. Interesting, enjoyable, entertaining. Again, not ' romantic '. Rail is part of the texture of Prince Rupert's history. During WW 11 thousands of of Allied troops passed through Prince Rupert on their way to, in many cases, combat in the Pacific.

- Hit the Firehall Museum. A low- key jewel of a place. Really liked it.

- Travelled to the North Pacific Cannery. A National Historic site. Highly interesting, insightful, and informative. The whole physical structure of this former ' company town ' lives on as a museum. Very professionally and seriously executed. The lives of those who toiled here during the boom years are not depicted in a romantic or patronizing manner. I only wish I had had more time to see and experience the place. It felt very authentic. Built in 1889. There was a seafood restaurant as well, but I did not eat there. Many were, however.

- Wandered 2-nd Ave, noting some examples of heritage there as well. Wandered through ' Cow Bay ': so named because ( apparently ) there was at one time a dairy but no dock. The bovines were forced to swim ashore from off- loading boats! Here I spent some time at the Ice- House Gallery; an artists- run co- operative. In the vicinity were other galleries, shops, restaurants, coffee shops. This was not Vienna, but felt ' real ' nonetheless.

- Attended a performance by a local community theatre group. The presentation itself was as good as anything I have seen in large, high- profile cities in North America or overseas. In the audience were international travellers as well as " Ruperites '. All were considerate, respectful, courteous. Maybe behind the building during intermission there was some imbibing of copious amounts of cheap alcohol; but I doubt it.

- Met and conversed with folks who are now permanent residents of Prince Rupert, having journeyed there from lands distant. Specifically: Phillipines, South Africa, and Portugal. Not exactly Toronto; but not bad, considering how small the city is. I likely passed migrant workers on the streets. To be Continued...


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