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eurail question

Travel Forums Europe eurail question

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1. Posted by adamsa (Budding Member 38 posts) 9y

I got my pass but I realized that I don't have any seats reserved.. Is it hard to get a seat on these trains even during the busiest month of the year or do you need to reserve a seat at the station before you get on the train (which would result in you having to take a later train)?

2. Posted by pranavc (Respected Member 316 posts) 9y

I would recommend making a reservation ahead of time - especially if you are reserving a couchette. During one of my trips, I was the only one that reserved a couchette ahead of time, and all my friends had to take the regular seats for an overnight journey from MIlan back to France even though their Eurail pass would have let them travel in a couchette. Hope this helps.

Pranav

3. Posted by adamsa (Budding Member 38 posts) 9y

Kind of.. I mean as long as I get a seat I dont care. The longest trip Im doing is 6 hours.. The rest are like 1.5-3hrs.. I just dont understand if its all the same train company or if its different trains by different countries and whether or not I need to make an extra confirmation on top of the eurial pass I already bought..

Quoting pranavc

I would recommend making a reservation ahead of time - especially if you are reserving a couchette. During one of my trips, I was the only one that reserved a couchette ahead of time, and all my friends had to take the regular seats for an overnight journey from MIlan back to France even though their Eurail pass would have let them travel in a couchette. Hope this helps.

Pranav

4. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 9y

If you arrive in a country, the very first thing you should do is to check up on the routes you intend to take within and from this country to see whether seat reservation is required or highly recommended for a train you intend to take. Just talk to the person behind the counter.

Reservation is usually recommended or required for high-speed and or long distance trains. Couchettes also need reservation. Friday afternoon and Sunday evening are also very busy, so reserving during this times make sense. You normally reserve at least one day in advance.

I generally reserve seats in ICE trains in Germany, especially going to or via Frankfurt, Mannheim, Cologne, Munich, Duesseldorf. That is because when ICE trains are very overcrowded, conductors have the tendency to kick off anybody who does not hold a reserved seat.

Local trains do not require reservations.

[ Edit: Edited on Jun 25, 2007, at 6:55 AM by t_maia ]

5. Posted by adamsa (Budding Member 38 posts) 9y

Thanks.. I was afraid of that. I suppose that explains why the train websites ask if you have a railpass or not. I guess I'll figure that stuff out each time I get to a city..

Quoting t_maia

If you arrive in a country, the very first thing you should do is to check up on the routes you intend to take within and from this country to see whether seat reservation is required or highly recommended for a train you intend to take. Just talk to the person behind the counter.

Reservation is usually recommended or required for high-speed and or long distance trains. Couchettes also need reservation. Friday afternoon and Sunday evening are also very busy, so reserving during this times make sense. You normally reserve at least one day in advance.

I generally reserve seats in ICE trains in Germany, especially going to or via Frankfurt, Mannheim, Cologne, Munich, Duesseldorf. That is because when ICE trains are very overcrowded, conductors have the tendency to kick off anybody who does not hold a reserved seat.

Local trains do not require reservations.

6. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 9y

I need to sleep more, I cannot believe I overlooked this earlier!

Quoting adamsa

I mean as long as I get a seat I dont care. The longest trip Im doing is 6 hours.. The rest are like 1.5-3hrs..

Could you please post your initiary? With such short journeys it might make more sense to buy point-to-point instead of using a Eurail pass. Actually, I'm quite sure that you'll save money buying point-to-point!

[ Edit: Edited on Jun 25, 2007, at 5:00 PM by t_maia ]

7. Posted by adamsa (Budding Member 38 posts) 9y

i had done my route on railsaver.com and ended up getting the 5day benelux/germany pass.. my itinerary is as follows

london paris brussels antwerp amsterdam berlin prague.. in italy ill definitely be doing city to city

Quoting t_maia

I need to sleep more, I cannot believe I overlooked this earlier!

Quoting adamsa

I mean as long as I get a seat I dont care. The longest trip Im doing is 6 hours.. The rest are like 1.5-3hrs..

Could you please post your initiary? With such short journeys it might make more sense to buy point-to-point instead of using a Eurail pass. Actually, I'm quite sure that you'll save money buying point-to-point!

8. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 9y

So rail tickets for less than 295 USD, ie 220 EUR?

I think it is definitely possible if you get a special from ns.nl from Amsterdam to Berlin or Prague. From Amsterdam to Berlin it is around 100 EUR and to Prague 120 EUR cheapest regular price, but offers are available from 29 EUR on. (There is also the option of budget flight of course.)

See www.ns.nl and www.skyscanner.net

Berlin to Prague is usually 55 EUR, but can also be had for 29 EUR special if you book in advance over the internet. www.bahn.de

Don't know how much Brussels-Antwerp-Amsterdam is, but bite me if it is more than 80 EUR. Brussels to Amsterdam should definetly be lower than 40 EUR, and Brussels to Antwerp should be around 9 EUR, so I etimate Brussels-Antwerp-Amsterdam to be less than 50 EUR definitely. Ask for a ticket from Brussels via Antwerp to Amsterdam and it should be less than 40 EUR for the cheapest connection.

Overall total: less than 200 EUR for the cheapest available regular tickets without any discounts.

Thus my advice: look for a cheap flight or special offer from Amsterdam to Berlin or Prague and throw the bloody Eurail pass away.

[ Edit: Edited on Jun 25, 2007, at 6:43 PM by t_maia ]

9. Posted by adamsa (Budding Member 38 posts) 9y

Damn.. Well, I already paid for it. Might as well use it and know better next time right? Im sure thats part of the scheme. Thanks though :)

Quoting t_maia

Overall total: less than 200 EUR for the cheapest available regular tickets without any discounts.

Thus my advice: look for a cheap flight or special offer from Amsterdam to Berlin or Prague and throw the bloody Eurail pass away.

10. Posted by willwn (Budding Member 5 posts) 9y

I was looking in to the Eurail pass options, and it looks like it basically just gets you discouted tickets where the pass is accepted. Is this right??
My tentative plan is to travel for 3-4 months and move around a pretty good bit (10 countries or so), so I was looking at some of the longer-term passes. It looks like one of these would cost $1,500-$2,000 (US). Even with such an extended stay and lots of travel it seems like it would still be cheaper to just buy tickets as I go and not get a rail pass. Does anyone have any insight about this???

Thank you much...